Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: The most important campaign

Expand Messages
  • Bill Bruner
    As to how much sway the soldier had on the folks back home; all I can say is that if my son (nephew, brother, cousin etc) were to write to me from the front
    Message 1 of 54 , Sep 2, 2006
      As to how much sway the soldier had on the folks back home; all I
      can say is that if my son (nephew, brother, cousin etc) were to
      write to me from the front that he favored one candidate over the
      other and that most men of his regiment agreed with him and he
      stated his cause I think that I would be strongly inclined to give
      his opinion much weight and urge my friends and neighbors in that
      direction.

      I can't help but be convinced that letters home after the fall of
      Atlanta increased in both number and ardour in favor of Lincoln.

      Bill Bruner


      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "hank9174" <clarkc@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > In 1864, you have to be 21 (and male) to vote.
      >
      > 618,000 US soldiers are 22 or over when they enlist and 2,159,000
      are
      > 21 or under, so the pool of possible voters is not *real* large.
      >
      > The people on the home front were mothers, fathers and wives with
      a
      > different view of events (and their sons and husbands 'sway') than
      > the men at the front...
      >
      >
      > HankC
      >
      > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Bruner" <banbruner@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > HankC writes:
      > >
      > > Of 4,175,000 votes cast, soldier's ballots totalled 154,000 (less
      > > than 4%) of the total. Lincoln garnered 120,000 of the votes by
      the
      > > boys in blue.
      > >
      > > Hank, how was this figure of 154,00 arrived at. If they were
      > > absentee ballots it would be easy to distinguish them as soldier
      > > votes.
      > > But I don't see how the soldier vote could be separated from the
      > > total population when these votes were cast by the soldiers that
      > > were able to return home to vote.
      > >
      > > 154,000 is a pretty definite number. Do you know if there is a
      > > difinite number on how many absentee ballots were cast or is
      there
      > a
      > > number that we can put on how many soldiers returned home to
      vote?
      > > I don't know, but have a certain suspicion that this number of
      > > 154,000 may be the number of absentee ballots cast.
      > >
      > > And as was pointed out by an earlier poster, it would seem
      > > reasonable to believe that the soldiers' choice would have great
      > > sway among their family and friends back home. So, I'm inclined
      to
      > > believe that even if many soldiers were unable to vote their
      stated
      > > opinions would have a great influence.
      > >
      > > Bill Bruner
      > >
      >
    • rbaquero@netzero.net
      ...No question about it, the TRUTH is only one = Abuse of Power and politics . -raul
      Message 54 of 54 , Sep 10, 2006

         

        ...No question about it, the TRUTH  is only one = Abuse of Power and politics .

        -raul

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.