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Re: [civilwarwest] looking for more information on the battle of Richmond Ky,...

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  • lilsteve68@aol.com
    Inline, First off On August 26 and 27, 2006, the fifth annual reenactment of the Battle of Richmond will commence for more information you can go to
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 20, 2006
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      Inline,
       
      First off On August 26 and 27, 2006, the fifth annual reenactment of the Battle of Richmond will commence for more information  you can go to www.battleofrichmond.org/  they may also be able to help you with the info you are searching for.
       
      I was suppose to attend the event but wont be able to make it but my reenacting unit will be there.
       
      Also there are two  book on the battle "When The Ripe Pears Fell"  (1996) by Dean Warren Lambert.   &  "Of Savage Fury: The Battle of Richmond, KY" (2006) by Anthony Hawkins  I have read neither  but they may have what your looking for.
       
      Regards,
      Steven Cone
       
       
      Here is some other info you  on the battle.
       
      Battle of Richmond,  Ky.

      The Battle of Richmond is one that is very unique, in that it was the most complete victory for the Confederacy, capturing many Yankees and paving the way for Confederate troops to march up through central Kentucky and head northeastward.
       
      Battle of Richmond

      The Battle of Richmond, often called the most complete victory for the Confederacy in the Civil War, took place near what is today the Bluegrass Army Depot. In 1862, Major General Kirby Smith led a Confederate offensive into Kentucky, led by Brigade General Patrick Cleburne with Coloniel John S. Scott's calvary taking the front.

      The first encounter occured just north of Big Hill on the trail to Richmond. On August 29, the Confederate troops encountered Union troops and began fighting. Soon after, artillery and infantry from the Union joined the skirmish and forced the Confederates back to Big Hill where they regrouped. Not wanting to take any chances, Brigade General Mahlon D. Manson, who was the commander of the Union forces in the Richmond area, ordered a brigade to march to Rogersville to encounter the Confederates. There was a brief skirmish with General Patrick Cleburne's troops but the Union retreated back briefly. General Mahlon Manson informed Major General William "Bull" Nelson, his superior, of this to which the Major ordered another brigade to be ready to support General Manson when required.

      Confederate Major General Kirby Smith ordered Brigade General Cleburne to attack in the morning and assured him that there would be reinforcements for his calvary. That morning, Cleburne marched northward towards Zion Church where he approached Union General Manson's battle line. Troops from both sides began collecting, preparing for a battle that would fully test the capabilities of each army.

      A short artillery duel began in the afternoon, followed by a full battle. The Yankees gave way after the Confederacy attacked with great strength, and retreated towards Rogersville where they made another stand. They continued to retreat towards Richmond Cemetery, where Major Nelson had finally arrived. Unfortunately, they were overwhelmingly defeated by the Confederacy; Nelson and a few of his men escaped, but the Confederates had caputured approximately 4,000 Union troops.



      Heritage Byway

      Following US 421, the Battle of Richmond: Civil War Heritage Byway highlights the historical significance of this region. From Big Hill near the Jackson, Rockcastle, and Madison County line, the byway proceeds northward past KY 21, the junction with US 25 north of Mt. Zion Church, ending in Richmond.

      Let's start at Big Hill, where Confederate Commander Coloniel John S. Scott's cavalry brigade ran into the Union's cavalry infrantry. This small skirmish forced the Confederate troops to retreat, abeit temporairly. A short drive from Big Hill are the ruins of the Merrit-Jones Tavern, an original log structure that was used for overnight lodging for travelers along what was Old State Road, now US 421. It also functioned as a small hospital for wounded Confederate soldiers who were brought here after the Battle of Richmond. Those who died from their injuries were buried behind the house in a small cemetery. These graves were unmarked until 1972, when Dr. John B. Floyd, Jr. revealed the names of the soldiers.

      Heading further north along US 421 is a historical marker that stands approximately in the center of what was the main battlefield during the heaviest fighting which took place on August 29 and 30 in 1862
       
      Heritage Byway

      Following US 421, the Battle of Richmond: Civil War Heritage Byway highlights the historical significance of this region. From Big Hill near the Jackson, Rockcastle, and Madison County line, the byway proceeds northward past KY 21, the junction with US 25 north of Mt. Zion Church, ending in Richmond.

      Let's start at Big Hill, where Confederate Commander Coloniel John S. Scott's cavalry brigade ran into the Union's cavalry infrantry. This small skirmish forced the Confederate troops to retreat, abeit temporairly. A short drive from Big Hill are the ruins of the Merrit-Jones Tavern, an original log structure that was used for overnight lodging for travelers along what was Old State Road, now US 421. It also functioned as a small hospital for wounded Confederate soldiers who were brought here after the Battle of Richmond. Those who died from their injuries were buried behind the house in a small cemetery. These graves were unmarked until 1972, when Dr. John B. Floyd, Jr. revealed the names of the soldiers.

      Heading further north along US 421 is a historical marker that stands approximately in the center of what was the main battlefield during the heaviest fighting which took place on August 29 and 30 in 1862.

      Near this is the new Battle of Richmond Battlefield Preservation Project, a preservation and interpretation concept that will restore a 19th century house and brick outbuilding, create a trail sstem, parking area, and improved vehicular access on the 62-acres, and create a small driving tour. Both the buildings and the land are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This is as a result of Governor Fletcher's Transportation Enhancement Projects for 2004, for which this project received $654,400 towards its goal of becoming a visitor's center along this historic road.

      To the north of the main battlefield is
      Mt. Zion Church.
      Constructed in 1852, it served as the Union hospital during the battle. As a bit of trivia that can still be seen today, there is a slight scar in the brickwork between the third and fourth windows on the south side towards the rear of the church, high up, that was caused by fire from the Confederates.

      The next stop is
      Fort Estill, the highest ground available between Richmond and the main battlefield. This is where Union forces, on August 29, viewed the battle ensuing to the south. A myraid of historical markers stand next to US 421.

      The Richmond Cemetery is where the demoralize Union troops had retreated to after they were defeated on the main battlefield. Unfortunately, they were overwhelmed by the Confederacy and most were captured and held prisoner.

      The last stop is the Madison County Courthouse, which is where the prisoners were herded to, paroled, and allowed to return home. The Confederates sent a cavalry brigade around Lexington during this time as well.
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