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Re: Myth or Truth of Sherman's March

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  • hank9174
    The evolution of the total war concept is an interesting one. The total war idea was mostly for propaganda and effect... and rations. It proved that the US
    Message 1 of 90 , Aug 4 1:41 PM
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      The evolution of the 'total war' concept is an interesting one.

      The 'total war' idea was mostly for propaganda and effect... and
      rations. It proved that the US Army could show the flag - where it
      wanted and when it wanted. It also allowed Sherman to eat his fill and
      deny the same to the CSA.

      Georgia is a big state. Sherman's path through it is relatively small
      and the last leg is through swampy, rice-growing areas that provide
      little sustenance and whose paddies are notoriously difficult to burn ;)

      The message that you are helpless is a difficult one to swallow. It's
      much more satisfying to tar the messenger. On the converse, Sherman
      found it more satisfying to destroy opponents property than their
      lives...


      HankC
    • Bill Bruner
      Tony, I didn t read Mr. Huddleston as saying that Meridian was a fiasco but only that it was an instance where Sherman was in independent command. Also wasn t
      Message 90 of 90 , Aug 7 11:16 AM
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        Tony, I didn't read Mr. Huddleston as saying that Meridian was a
        fiasco but only that it was an instance where Sherman was in
        independent command. Also wasn't Sherman in independent at
        Chickasaw Bluffs?
        Bill Bruner





        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Gunter"
        <tony_gunter@...>wrote:
        >
        > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Huddleston"
        > <huddleston.r@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Keep in mind., also, that neither man had been in independent
        command.
        > > Thomas' only independent command had been with a small number
        leading
        > up to
        > > Mill Springs two years before and Sherman's had been a fiasco in
        > Kentucky
        > > early in the war and more recently, I guess, the Meridian
        Campaign.
        >
        > I don't see how the Meridian Campaign can be considered a fiasco.
        > Halleck would not allow Sherman to re-allocate the troops under
        his
        > command. Rather than have them sitting idle, he proposed a two-
        prong
        > raid to clear out the Mississippi River Valley. One wing of that
        raid
        > would strike out for Meridian in the winter, and return to
        Vicksburg in
        > time to assist in the second wing's strike on Shreveport.
        >
        > Given these parameters, the Meridian Campaign was a success. The
        only
        > secondary objective I pick up on in Sherman's correspondence is
        that he
        > would have liked to have drawn Polk into a battle. However, he
        felt
        > that Sooy Smith's failure to show up allowed Polk to flee faster
        than
        > Sherman could bear upon him.
        >
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