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Re: Vicksburg - McClernad's command

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  • bjer50010
    ... talked about what ... said that he had ... they were in when ... very little ... been at a ... provide equipment and ... book or ... Nick, You might want
    Message 1 of 63 , Jul 20, 2006
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, nickrelee@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > I was on another board once (got way too many emails) that
      talked about what
      > influence McC really had on recruiting and Brooks Simpson
      said that he had
      > looked at what regiments were credited to McC and what stage
      they were in when
      > McC came to Illinois, etc. And he found that McC probably had
      very little
      > influence on getting men to join up. His influence might have
      been at a
      > higher level where he was able to convince politicians to
      provide equipment and
      > uniforms faster. But I don't think I've ever seen this laid out in a
      book or
      > magazine.

      Nick,

      You might want to check out Kiper's bio of McClernand. He is
      generally pro-McClernand (as you would expect, it's a bio of
      McC). The number of recruits that are directly attributable to his
      personal influence is actually very small. What he did well, and
      Kiper makes the point that he believes McC's main mission was
      to organize those troops, not to raise them, was to get them
      equipped, organized into units and paid. He worked extremely
      hard to get those troops ready to be sent down to Memphis or
      wherever they were headed. Essentially Brooks Simpson
      seems to agree with Kiper on this issue.

      JB Jewell

      > --Nick Kurtz
      >
      > In a message dated 7/20/2006 11:16:37 AM Mountain Daylight
      Time,
      > barry.jewell@... writes:
      >
      > I think Lincoln
      > realized how much good he could do raising and organizing
      troops
      > (and to be fair to McClernand he did a great job at that).
      >
    • bjer50010
      ... talked about what ... said that he had ... they were in when ... very little ... been at a ... provide equipment and ... book or ... Nick, You might want
      Message 63 of 63 , Jul 20, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, nickrelee@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > I was on another board once (got way too many emails) that
        talked about what
        > influence McC really had on recruiting and Brooks Simpson
        said that he had
        > looked at what regiments were credited to McC and what stage
        they were in when
        > McC came to Illinois, etc. And he found that McC probably had
        very little
        > influence on getting men to join up. His influence might have
        been at a
        > higher level where he was able to convince politicians to
        provide equipment and
        > uniforms faster. But I don't think I've ever seen this laid out in a
        book or
        > magazine.

        Nick,

        You might want to check out Kiper's bio of McClernand. He is
        generally pro-McClernand (as you would expect, it's a bio of
        McC). The number of recruits that are directly attributable to his
        personal influence is actually very small. What he did well, and
        Kiper makes the point that he believes McC's main mission was
        to organize those troops, not to raise them, was to get them
        equipped, organized into units and paid. He worked extremely
        hard to get those troops ready to be sent down to Memphis or
        wherever they were headed. Essentially Brooks Simpson
        seems to agree with Kiper on this issue.

        JB Jewell

        > --Nick Kurtz
        >
        > In a message dated 7/20/2006 11:16:37 AM Mountain Daylight
        Time,
        > barry.jewell@... writes:
        >
        > I think Lincoln
        > realized how much good he could do raising and organizing
        troops
        > (and to be fair to McClernand he did a great job at that).
        >
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