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Re: Memphis

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  • Carl Williams
    Western Tennessee, surrounded on three parts by navigable rivers, is a bit of a paradox defensively. Initially it is quite well served by CS Railroads and
    Message 1 of 109 , Jul 14, 2006
      Western Tennessee, surrounded on three parts by navigable rivers, is a
      bit of a paradox defensively. Initially it is quite well served by CS
      Railroads and easily supplied and somewhat formidable. In order not to
      be flanked by Union forces using those rivers, however, the various
      forts needed to turn back Federal riverboats. I find most people don't
      realize Ft Pillow [yes, the same fort Forrest assaulted when Union
      held in '64] was holding out quite well as a Rebel Redoubt and was not
      defeated by the US Navy but instead had to be abandoned when
      threatened from the rear.
      How comes about this threat? The fall of Corinth. Once Pillow fell,
      Memphis was next. So I think the importance of Corinth can be
      overlooked. The Union strategy was basically sound.
      See:
      http://www.cr.nps.gov/hps/abpp/battles/tn004.htm
      particularly the statement "Confederate Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard ordered
      troops out of Fort Pillow and Memphis on June 4, after learning of
      Union Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck's occupation of Corinth, Mississippi"

      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, nickrelee@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > Every city or fort along the Mississippi is important. Some are not
      as
      > easily defended. Memphis was one of those places that wasn't as
      easily defended.
      > --Nick Kurtz
    • Carl Williams
      Western Tennessee, surrounded on three parts by navigable rivers, is a bit of a paradox defensively. Initially it is quite well served by CS Railroads and
      Message 109 of 109 , Jul 14, 2006
        Western Tennessee, surrounded on three parts by navigable rivers, is a
        bit of a paradox defensively. Initially it is quite well served by CS
        Railroads and easily supplied and somewhat formidable. In order not to
        be flanked by Union forces using those rivers, however, the various
        forts needed to turn back Federal riverboats. I find most people don't
        realize Ft Pillow [yes, the same fort Forrest assaulted when Union
        held in '64] was holding out quite well as a Rebel Redoubt and was not
        defeated by the US Navy but instead had to be abandoned when
        threatened from the rear.
        How comes about this threat? The fall of Corinth. Once Pillow fell,
        Memphis was next. So I think the importance of Corinth can be
        overlooked. The Union strategy was basically sound.
        See:
        http://www.cr.nps.gov/hps/abpp/battles/tn004.htm
        particularly the statement "Confederate Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard ordered
        troops out of Fort Pillow and Memphis on June 4, after learning of
        Union Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck's occupation of Corinth, Mississippi"

        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, nickrelee@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > Every city or fort along the Mississippi is important. Some are not
        as
        > easily defended. Memphis was one of those places that wasn't as
        easily defended.
        > --Nick Kurtz
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