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Re : Affair at the Gulp House?

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  • Bill Bruner
    Tom, here is my reading on Castel s analysis 1. Sherman says that he met with Schofield and Hooker in the little church as it was raining. Schofield denies
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 4, 2006
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      Tom, here is my reading on Castel's analysis




      1. Sherman says that he met with Schofield and Hooker in the "little
      church" as it was raining.
      Schofield denies this, or at least does not remember what would
      have been a most memorable meeting.
      By all accounts it didn't rain that day.

      2. Sherman faults Hooker with violating the chain of command when
      in fact Hooker was answering a direct query from Sherman himself .

      3. Sherman says that Hooker pretends not to know that Hascall was
      on his right. When in fact at least 12 hours earlier Hooker had
      reported to Thomas, giving full credit to Hascall for his
      contribution to the fight.

      4. Hooker had good reason to believe that all three confederate
      corps were present.
      Prisoners had reported that Hood and Hardee were there.
      Butterfield had encountered the left of Hardee.
      Geary and Williams had skirmished with Hood's picketts and
      Ferguson's cavalry which belonged to Polk (now Loring),

      5. Sherman faults Hooker for asking for help before employing
      Butterfield.
      Read Hookers note: he didn't ask for help. Butterfield was way
      to the left and could be of no help to Hooker's right.
      according Castel's map of the battle Butterfield is facing
      Hardee's leftward most troops.

      6. Hooker refers to his concern for the "extreme right" not his
      right. Schofield's right is the extreme right of the army and it
      seems clear that this is what Hooker was referring to.

      Bill Bruner
    • Tom Mix
      Fascinating. Very interesting. Hooker seems to have been correct in his assessment as he was more often than not in his ACW career. It sounds like he was on
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 4, 2006
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        Fascinating.
        Very interesting. Hooker seems to have been correct in his assessment as he
        was more often than not in his ACW career. It sounds like he was on top of
        the situation. Was his note in enough detail for others to fully understand
        or was it an honest mistake in description? Hooker was much too experienced
        and courageous to as for help from Butterfield who not have been in position
        to provide it. Hooker would have understood that. Plus, if he asked for
        assistance, then it was needed. But it seems to be in doubt as whether or
        not he expressed this need. It doesn't sound like he did. It sounds he
        expressed a need to have the far right, Schofield, supported.
        Is that your take?
        Tom

        -----Original Message-----
        From: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com [mailto:civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Bill Bruner
        Sent: Sunday, June 04, 2006 4:50 PM
        To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [civilwarwest] Re : Affair at the Gulp House?

        Tom, here is my reading on Castel's analysis




        1. Sherman says that he met with Schofield and Hooker in the "little
        church" as it was raining.
        Schofield denies this, or at least does not remember what would
        have been a most memorable meeting.
        By all accounts it didn't rain that day.

        2. Sherman faults Hooker with violating the chain of command when
        in fact Hooker was answering a direct query from Sherman himself .

        3. Sherman says that Hooker pretends not to know that Hascall was
        on his right. When in fact at least 12 hours earlier Hooker had
        reported to Thomas, giving full credit to Hascall for his
        contribution to the fight.

        4. Hooker had good reason to believe that all three confederate
        corps were present.
        Prisoners had reported that Hood and Hardee were there.
        Butterfield had encountered the left of Hardee.
        Geary and Williams had skirmished with Hood's picketts and
        Ferguson's cavalry which belonged to Polk (now Loring),

        5. Sherman faults Hooker for asking for help before employing
        Butterfield.
        Read Hookers note: he didn't ask for help. Butterfield was way
        to the left and could be of no help to Hooker's right.
        according Castel's map of the battle Butterfield is facing
        Hardee's leftward most troops.

        6. Hooker refers to his concern for the "extreme right" not his
        right. Schofield's right is the extreme right of the army and it
        seems clear that this is what Hooker was referring to.

        Bill Bruner








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      • Bob Taubman
        According to Castel, According to other and more believable sources, however, every part of this story is either false or at best badly distorted.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 4, 2006
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          According to Castel, "According to other and more believable sources, however, every part of this story is either false or at best badly distorted.  Butterfield's division held the left of Hooker's line at Kolb's Farm;  it could not have been switched to the right without opening a gap in the Union front, and it is impossible to believe the Butterfield, a close friend of Hooker's told Sherman otherwise. "

          ----- Original Message ----
          From: Tom Mix <tmix@...>
          To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, June 4, 2006 6:00:15 PM
          Subject: RE: [civilwarwest] Re : Affair at the Gulp House?

          Fascinating.
          Very interesting. Hooker seems to have been correct in his assessment as he
          was more often than not in his ACW career. It sounds like he was on top of
          the situation. Was his note in enough detail for others to fully understand
          or was it an honest mistake in description? Hooker was much too experienced
          and courageous to as for help from Butterfield who not have been in position
          to provide it. Hooker would have understood that. Plus, if he asked for
          assistance, then it was needed. But it seems to be in doubt as whether or
          not he expressed this need. It doesn't sound like he did. It sounds he
          expressed a need to have the far right, Schofield, supported.
          Is that your take?
          Tom

          -----Original Message-----
          From: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com [mailto:civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of Bill Bruner
          Sent: Sunday, June 04, 2006 4:50 PM
          To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [civilwarwest] Re : Affair at the Gulp House?

          Tom, here is my reading on Castel's analysis




          1. Sherman says that he met with Schofield and Hooker in the "little
          church" as it was raining.
            Schofield denies this, or at least does not remember what would
          have been a most memorable meeting.
            By all accounts it didn't rain that day.

          2.  Sherman faults Hooker with violating the chain of command when
          in fact Hooker was answering a direct query from  Sherman himself .

          3.  Sherman says that Hooker pretends not to know that Hascall was
          on his right.  When in fact at least 12 hours earlier Hooker had
          reported to Thomas, giving full credit to Hascall for his
          contribution to the fight.

          4.  Hooker had good reason to believe that all three confederate
          corps were present.
            Prisoners had reported that Hood and Hardee were there.
            Butterfield had encountered the left of Hardee.
            Geary and Williams had skirmished with Hood's picketts and
          Ferguson's cavalry which belonged to Polk (now Loring),

          5.  Sherman faults Hooker for  asking for help before employing
          Butterfield.
             Read Hookers note:  he didn't ask for help.  Butterfield was way
          to the left and could be of no help to Hooker's right.
             according Castel's map of the battle Butterfield is facing
          Hardee's leftward most troops.

          6.  Hooker refers to his concern for the "extreme right"  not his
          right.  Schofield's right is the extreme right of the army and it
          seems clear that this is what Hooker was referring to.

          Bill Bruner








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