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DEL & Emancipation

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  • Stanley Balsky
    Nor I am I an expert on DEL history. Just find it fascinating that a state with such a small slave population that remained in the union would cling to slavery
    Message 1 of 9 , May 1, 2006
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      Nor I am I an expert on DEL history.
      Just find it fascinating that a state with such a
      small slave population that remained in the union
      would cling to slavery as it did.
      They refused compensated emancipation during the war.
      Took to 1901 to ratify the 13-15th Amendements.
      Stan

      --- hooperjwboro@... wrote:


      ---------------------------------
      The 13th was ratified in 1865 shortly after
      introduced. I would suspect since it was law, Delaware
      may have considered the ratification (Delaware's
      legislature) unimportant as to process rather than
      adherance to slavery.
      Just a guess as I am not a Delaware history expert.

      --
      Regards,
      Hooper
      -------------- Original message
      ----------------------
      From: Stanley Balsky <balsky@...>





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      ---------------------------------

      > From: Stanley Balsky <balsky@...>
      > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: RE: [civilwarwest] Re: Numbers of
      > Border State Troops; was: Kentucky Hanging
      > Date: Mon, 1 May 2006 04:21:09 +0000
      >

      ---------------------------------
      It is amazing to me since the state had so few slaves
      how strongly it adhered to slavery.
      Stan
      --- Bob Huddleston <huddleston.r@...> wrote:

      > Thanks for the correction.
      >
      > I would note that there were 1,798 slaves in
      > Delaware according to the 1860
      > Census. Second smallest number of slaves in a state
      > was Maryland with
      > 87,189.
      >
      > Take care,
      >
      > Bob
      >
      > Judy and Bob Huddleston
      > 10643 Sperry Street
      > Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
      > 303.451.6376 Huddleston.r@...
      >
      > "Don't argue with someone who claims the earth is
      > flat. You haven't given it
      > a second thought, whereas he has spent 20 years
      > thinking about and obsessing
      > over why it is flat."
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      >

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    • Bob Huddleston
      The late ratification does not surprise me. MD and CA finally got around to ratifying the 13th in 1959 and the 14th in 1962! As for the initial failure to
      Message 2 of 9 , May 1, 2006
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        The late ratification does not surprise me. MD and CA finally got around to ratifying the 13th in 1959 and the 14th in 1962!
         
        As for the initial failure to ratify during 1865, as well as the earlier refusal to consider compensated emancipation, simply and all too sadly, this shows how deeply ingrained slavery was in even a minor slave state.
         
        Lincoln was very frustrated at the refusal of any of the border states to even consider compensated along with delayed emancipation. His fine mathematical mind argued that compensation would be a lot cheaper than a few days of the war and it should have been obvious that slavery was doomed. But none of the border state leadership, whether governor or senator or representative would even talk about the subject.

        Take care,

        Bob

        Judy and Bob Huddleston
        10643 Sperry Street
        Northglenn, CO  80234-3612
        303.451.6376  Huddleston.r@...

        "Don't argue with someone who claims the earth is flat. You haven't given it a second thought, whereas he has spent 20 years thinking about and obsessing over why it is flat."

         


        From: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com [mailto:civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Stanley Balsky
        Sent: Monday, May 01, 2006 7:34 PM
        To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [civilwarwest] DEL & Emancipation

        Nor am I an expert on DEL history.
        I just find in fascinating that a state with such a
        small slave population did not accept an offer of
        compensated emancipation during the war,and also did
        not ratify the 13-15th amendements until 1901.
        Stan

        --- hooperjwboro@... wrote:

      • endeavorgot
        ... around to ... earlier ... sadly, this ... state. ... states to ... than a few ... doomed. But ... How was the ratification of the 13th and 14th handled in
        Message 3 of 9 , May 2, 2006
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          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Huddleston"
          <huddleston.r@...> wrote:
          >
          > The late ratification does not surprise me. MD and CA finally got
          around to
          > ratifying the 13th in 1959 and the 14th in 1962!
          >
          > As for the initial failure to ratify during 1865, as well as the
          earlier
          > refusal to consider compensated emancipation, simply and all too
          sadly, this
          > shows how deeply ingrained slavery was in even a minor slave
          state.
          >
          > Lincoln was very frustrated at the refusal of any of the border
          states to
          > even consider compensated along with delayed emancipation. His fine
          > mathematical mind argued that compensation would be a lot cheaper
          than a few
          > days of the war and it should have been obvious that slavery was
          doomed. But
          > none of the border state leadership, whether governor or senator or
          > representative would even talk about the subject.
          >
          > Take care,
          >
          > Bob
          >
          How was the ratification of the 13th and 14th handled in the
          deep south states?

          Bill Bruner
        • Stanley Balsky
          IIRC ratification was part of the process of being readmitted to congress. Stan ... CA finally got around to ... well as the earlier ... and all too sadly,
          Message 4 of 9 , May 2, 2006
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            IIRC ratification was part of the process of being
            readmitted to congress.
            Stan

            --- endeavorgot <banbruner@...> wrote:


            ---------------------------------
            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Huddleston"
            <huddleston.r@...> wrote:
            >
            > The late ratification does not surprise me. MD and
            CA finally got
            around to
            > ratifying the 13th in 1959 and the 14th in 1962!
            >
            > As for the initial failure to ratify during 1865, as
            well as the
            earlier
            > refusal to consider compensated emancipation, simply
            and all too
            sadly, this
            > shows how deeply ingrained slavery was in even a
            minor slave
            state.
            >
            > Lincoln was very frustrated at the refusal of any of
            the border
            states to
            > even consider compensated along with delayed
            emancipation. His fine
            > mathematical mind argued that compensation would be
            a lot cheaper
            than a few
            > days of the war and it should have been obvious that
            slavery was
            doomed. But
            > none of the border state leadership, whether
            governor or senator or
            > representative would even talk about the subject.
            >
            > Take care,
            >
            > Bob
            >
            How was the ratification of the 13th and 14th
            handled in the
            deep south states?

            Bill Bruner





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