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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Grimsley's blog

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  • DPowell334@AOL.COM
    In a message dated 12/8/2005 7:29:03 P.M. Central Standard Time, tony_gunter@yahoo.com writes: Wasn t it Johnston who suggested to Pemberton to give up
    Message 1 of 68 , Dec 9, 2005
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      In a message dated 12/8/2005 7:29:03 P.M. Central Standard Time, tony_gunter@... writes:
      Wasn't it Johnston who suggested to Pemberton to give up Vicksbug,
      defeat Grant in detail, then regain Vicksburg later?  When McPherson
      found himself isolated from supply and communication south of Snake
      Creek Gap, it was the perfect opportunity for Johnston to defeat a
      large portion of the federal army in detail. 
      I'll get in trouble for this, but I have always found Johnston to be a "sayer" not a "doer."
       
      The exact same circumstances arise during August 1863. Johnston's big strategic idea before Vicksburg is akin to Beauregard's - to not try and defend everything at once, but instead concentrate on the center, Reinforce Bragg's army, and defeat the Union forces in Middle Tennessee - from there they can drive west to threaten Grant's flank at Memphis or north into KY. Either way, so goes the thinking, reinforcing Bragg to numerical superiority and regaining Central Tennessee would be a major strategic victory.
       
      In August and September, this exact opportunity arises. Bragg needs men, proposes to JEJ that they unite for a counter-attack.
       
      Johnston's response? Grudging. He wants to send only a brigade or two. And these troops are a loan, to be returned promptly. At first they should only be used to guard Atlanta for a day or two, until troops from the east arrive. When Bragg doesn't return them immediately, Johnston whines at him in telegrams, reminding him that they are a loan.
       
      Where is the Johnston of the grand central column? Why does he not lead the bulk of his Mississippi force - which is more than 30,000 men before detachments, after all - to join Bragg, assume command, and overpower Rosecrans. This force, combined with Longstreet when he arrived, might have numbered 80-85,000 men, a significant advantage over Rosey's 60,000 or so.
       
      The contrast between the Johnston of April and May, proposing this strategy and railing on about how useless the administration's plans are, seems dramatic when compared to the Johnston of September, grudgingly parceling out a brigade or two and demanding prompt return, like he's a "Cash for Titles" lending joint.
       
      Dave Powell
    • SDE80@aol.com
      In a message dated 1/6/2006 1:02:25 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... I wouldn t dispute Newton s numbers. 11-7 is pretty close to 10-7 Sam Elliott
      Message 68 of 68 , Jan 6, 2006
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        In a message dated 1/6/2006 1:02:25 AM Eastern Standard Time, wh_keene@... writes:

        4/30          110,123    55,100    50%
        5/31-6/10     112,819    69,946    62%


        I wouldn't dispute Newton's numbers. 11-7 is pretty close to 10-7 <g>

        Sam Elliott
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