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[civilwarwest] Daniel Harvey Hill

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  • Dick Weeks
    Just a little food for thought. As you know many of the Eastern Theater commanders also fought in the Western Theater. I know the first one come to mind is
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 8, 2000
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      Just a little food for thought. As you know many of the Eastern Theater commanders also fought in the Western Theater. I know the first one come to mind is Longstreet, but how about another, that is little mentioned. Daniel Harvey Hill (D.H. Hill). Hill was a feisty, outspoken commander that Lee finally had transferred, but did good service in the ANV. Starting at Big Bethel, he fought in the Seven Days, missed 2nd Manassas, and rejoined Lee during the Maryland Campaign.  I think his best service was at South Mountain and Antietam during this campaign. Although he fought at Fredericksburg, his best days with the ANV were behind him. At South Mountain he held off a full corps of McClellan’s army for most of the day. Finally pushed off, he formed his division along the Antietam at the center of the Confederate line at the Sunken Road (later to be known as "Bloody Lane"). He started the morning with about 5,000 men but shortly after the action began on the north end of the field Lee pulled 3,000 of his men to support the action. Before the morning was over, Hill’s greatly reduced little division would face 10,000 men in blue. Although his line finally broke, he and his men put up a heck of a fight. This just gives you an idea of what kind of fighter this man was. The problem was he was so outspoken. So much so as to be considered a "liability". The reason I speak about him, other than the fact that I like him, regardless of how hard he was to get along with, is that I thought you might like to know what he thought about the Western Theater commanders. The following is from "Battles and Leaders":

      'At the beginning of the Civil War I was asked the question; " Who of the Federal officers are most to be feared ? " I replied : " Sherman, Rosecrans, and McClellan. Sherman has genius and daring, and is full of resources. Rosecrans has fine practical sense, and is of a tough, tenacious fiber. McClellan is a man of talents, and his delight has always been in the study of military history and the art and science of war." Grant was not once thought of. The light of subsequent events thrown upon the careers of these three great soldiers has not changed my estimate of them ; but I acquiesce in the verdict which has given greater renown to some of their comrades. It was my lot to form a more intimate acquaintance with the three illustrious officers who I foresaw would play an important part in the war. I fought against McClellan from Yorktown to Sharpsburg (Antietam), I encountered Rosecrans at Chickamauga, and I surrendered to Sherman at Greensboro', N.. C.-each of the three commanding an army."-D. H. H.

      If you would like to read more from where this came from, you will find it at:

      Chickamauga - The Great Battle of the West
       
      I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
      Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
      http://www.civilwarhome.com
    • Dick Weeks
      Just a little food for thought. As you know many of the Eastern Theater commanders also fought in the Western Theater. I know the first one come to mind is
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 8, 2000
      • 0 Attachment

        Just a little food for thought. As you know many of the Eastern Theater commanders also fought in the Western Theater. I know the first one come to mind is Longstreet, but how about another, that is little mentioned. Daniel Harvey Hill (D.H. Hill). Hill was a feisty, outspoken commander that Lee finally had transferred, but did good service in the ANV. Starting at Big Bethel, he fought in the Seven Days, missed 2nd Manassas, and rejoined Lee during the Maryland Campaign.  I think his best service was at South Mountain and Antietam during this campaign. Although he fought at Fredericksburg, his best days with the ANV were behind him. At South Mountain he held off a full corps of McClellan’s army for most of the day. Finally pushed off, he formed his division along the Antietam at the center of the Confederate line at the Sunken Road (later to be known as "Bloody Lane"). He started the morning with about 5,000 men but shortly after the action began on the north end of the field Lee pulled 3,000 of his men to support the action. Before the morning was over, Hill’s greatly reduced little division would face 10,000 men in blue. Although his line finally broke, he and his men put up a heck of a fight. This just gives you an idea of what kind of fighter this man was. The problem was he was so outspoken. So much so as to be considered a "liability". The reason I speak about him, other than the fact that I like him, regardless of how hard he was to get along with, is that I thought you might like to know what he thought about the Western Theater commanders. The following is from "Battles and Leaders":

        'At the beginning of the Civil War I was asked the question; " Who of the Federal officers are most to be feared ? " I replied : " Sherman, Rosecrans, and McClellan. Sherman has genius and daring, and is full of resources. Rosecrans has fine practical sense, and is of a tough, tenacious fiber. McClellan is a man of talents, and his delight has always been in the study of military history and the art and science of war." Grant was not once thought of. The light of subsequent events thrown upon the careers of these three great soldiers has not changed my estimate of them ; but I acquiesce in the verdict which has given greater renown to some of their comrades. It was my lot to form a more intimate acquaintance with the three illustrious officers who I foresaw would play an important part in the war. I fought against McClellan from Yorktown to Sharpsburg (Antietam), I encountered Rosecrans at Chickamauga, and I surrendered to Sherman at Greensboro', N.. C.-each of the three commanding an army."-D. H. H.

        If you would like to read more from where this came from, you will find it at:

        Chickamauga - The Great Battle of the West
         
        I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
        Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
        http://www.civilwarhome.com
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