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Re: Snake Creek Gap

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  • josepharose
    Mark Grimsley is apparently much less judgmental than I. I think that a pretty definite judgment can be made concerning Thomas plan and why Sherman and
    Message 1 of 198 , Aug 30, 2005
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      Mark Grimsley is apparently much less judgmental than I. I think that
      a pretty definite judgment can be made concerning Thomas' plan and why
      Sherman and McPherson failed. The Blogsite notes that: "2 p.m. -
      Dodge's two divisions are now at the crossroads in force. . . . 4
      p.m. - Logan's three divisions are now at the crossroads."

      As Thomas was planning on sending in some 60,000 men, versus the
      ~24,000 which went in with McPherson, it seems no great stretch to
      conclude that he would send them in in one stream. Given the timings
      offered by Mark Grimsley, the first 24,000 would be available to
      defend against any likely CSA incursions on that day, and the
      additional troops arriving that afternoon and evening (the end of
      civil twilight was at 8:01 p.m. but there wasn't much of a moon after
      that), and the next morning would suffice to defend against the bulk
      of Johnston's army.

      With that headstart and no probable stoppages in the arrival of
      reinforcements, Thomas' plan would seem rather easily done--in a war
      where gaining such an advantage came rarely and usually after great
      sacrifice.

      Furthermore, Thomas' troops wouldn't have suffered under the handicaps
      of no cavalry and short rations as McPherson's did.

      Joseph
    • GnrlJEJohnston@aol.com
      In a message dated 9/4/2005 10:37:14 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, dan6764@yahoo.com writes: An 1866 document produced by laborers locating bodies on the
      Message 198 of 198 , Sep 4, 2005
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        In a message dated 9/4/2005 10:37:14 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, dan6764@... writes:
        An 1866 document produced by laborers locating bodies on the battlefield stated that the heaviest concentrations of dead lay on the eastern and western sections of the field and that the dead were fairly light in the center where the Hornets Nest was located.. 
        This may be true Dan, but remember, as soon as the battle ended, Union troops started gathering up their dead as well as Confederate dead.  Those that might have been found after the war was over, were most likely those that were killed in the brush and bramble of the battlefield, whereas, the Hornet's Nest was quite open and bodies were easily found there following the battle.
        Just a thought of common sense with only documentation of them finding and burying the dead following the battle.  IIRC, Grant denied Beauregard  access to Confederate dead, since they already had been gathered up and buried.
         
        JEJ
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