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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Mill Springs

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  • Bob Taubman
    ... batteries, ... piece ... than ... equipment, ... of ... brought 6 ... is ... I am just looking at the 2 numbers given in what appears to be the same
    Message 1 of 141 , Aug 22, 2005
      hank9174 <clarkc@...> wrote:

      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "William H Keene"
      wrote:
      > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, Bob Taubman
      wrote:
      > > ...
      > > From Education in Violence:
      > >
      > > "Crittenden's artillery was not used effectively. Thomas'
      batteries,
      > according to his opponents, swept the field with shell, grape and
      > canister. Their fire was decisive in forcing the evacuation of the
      > Rebels' fortified camp. Eleven pieces of artillery (one other
      piece
      > was captured during the retreat), more than 150 wagons and more
      than
      > 1000 horses and mules were abandoned, together with camp
      equipment,
      > small arms and stores."
      > >
      > > Interesting difference. What is your source of reference?
      >
      > In his report, Crittenden claims that he had a total of 16 pieces
      of
      > artillery in his command. When he advanced on Thomas he only
      brought 6
      > with him, leaving the rest at his encampment. This is where Hank
      is
      > missing the point.

      I am just looking at the 2 numbers given in what appears to be the
      same report...

      Initial reports are written days, and frequently weeks, after the
      fact.

      Final reports are usually months and sometimes more than a year after
      the event. They wait for all the subordinate reports which go through
      a similar process of correction and revision. Typically the report,
      at every level, is outlined by the chief, written by an aide and then
      reconciled and corrected.

      Many reasons (typically death and loss of records) prevent timely,
      accurate writing of reports, especially during times of heavy action.

      All reports depend upon timely, accurate reports from the
      subordinates. All reports prune detail as they ascend the chain of
      command.


      HankC

       

      Hank, I just think you were wrong on this issue.  Simple as that.  Once you come clean and admit that, you will feel much better. 

      BobT








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    • Bob Taubman
      ... batteries, ... piece ... than ... equipment, ... of ... brought 6 ... is ... I am just looking at the 2 numbers given in what appears to be the same
      Message 141 of 141 , Aug 22, 2005
        hank9174 <clarkc@...> wrote:

        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "William H Keene"
        wrote:
        > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, Bob Taubman
        wrote:
        > > ...
        > > From Education in Violence:
        > >
        > > "Crittenden's artillery was not used effectively. Thomas'
        batteries,
        > according to his opponents, swept the field with shell, grape and
        > canister. Their fire was decisive in forcing the evacuation of the
        > Rebels' fortified camp. Eleven pieces of artillery (one other
        piece
        > was captured during the retreat), more than 150 wagons and more
        than
        > 1000 horses and mules were abandoned, together with camp
        equipment,
        > small arms and stores."
        > >
        > > Interesting difference. What is your source of reference?
        >
        > In his report, Crittenden claims that he had a total of 16 pieces
        of
        > artillery in his command. When he advanced on Thomas he only
        brought 6
        > with him, leaving the rest at his encampment. This is where Hank
        is
        > missing the point.

        I am just looking at the 2 numbers given in what appears to be the
        same report...

        Initial reports are written days, and frequently weeks, after the
        fact.

        Final reports are usually months and sometimes more than a year after
        the event. They wait for all the subordinate reports which go through
        a similar process of correction and revision. Typically the report,
        at every level, is outlined by the chief, written by an aide and then
        reconciled and corrected.

        Many reasons (typically death and loss of records) prevent timely,
        accurate writing of reports, especially during times of heavy action.

        All reports depend upon timely, accurate reports from the
        subordinates. All reports prune detail as they ascend the chain of
        command.


        HankC

         

        Hank, I just think you were wrong on this issue.  Simple as that.  Once you come clean and admit that, you will feel much better. 

        BobT








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        What would our lives be like without music, dance, and theater?Donate or volunteer in the arts today at Network for Good.
        --------------------------------------------------------------------~->


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        <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/civilwarwest/

        <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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