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[civilwarwest] Re: Re:Port Hudson La.

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  • DAP4477575@aol.com
    Hi I am new to this kind of board and hope the following is not out of order but since we are talking about touring some of the battle fields I will jump in
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 13, 1999
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      Hi
      I am new to this kind of board and hope the following is not out of order but
      since we are talking about touring some of the battle fields I will jump in
      with one of the few I have visited. Port Hudson has some meaning to me for I
      had an ancestor there. When I visited the site in January, I was the only one
      there, Which may have added to the surreal feeling of being there. The
      visitor center has a short film on the history and the trails that you walk.
      As with many of the CW battle fields, This one is not as it was in 1863 much
      of the land is privately owned and off limits to the visitor and the
      Mississippi River has changed course over the last 135 years. I have included
      a short history and a statistic of the siege I found.

      The heaviest numerical loss during any single battle was at Gettysburg where
      40,322 Americans were killed or wounded. On the Union side 21 per cent of
      those engaged were killed or wounded, in the Confederate ranks 30 per cent -
      the largest percentage of Confederates hit in any battle. The largest
      percentage of Union soldiers hit in battle was at Port Hudson in May 1863,
      where 26.7 per cent of those engaged were killed or wounded.

      Extracted from CIVIL WAR HANDBOOK by W H Price. A Civil War Research


      The following text comes from the brochure given at the Port Hudson State
      Commemorative Area.


      Port Hudson State Commemorative Area

      This area's geographic location as a potential military post had first been
      noted by the British a century before the American Civil War. Port Hudson was
      situated high on the bluffs overlooking a substantial bend in the river which
      required ships passing downstream to reduce speed. Fighting the current
      upstream was always a slow, painstaking process. As such, the strategic
      importance of Port Hudson was quickly grasped by Confederate authorities
      following the fall of New Orleans. The terrain along the east bank of the
      Mississippi River abounded with natural ravines which could be easily adapted
      as a defensive perimeter, and earthworks joining these could be readily
      constructed so as to make the place virtually impregnable. It is this
      environment and setting which led to the siege of Port Hudson.

      From the standpoint of military strategy, the Confederate fortifications at
      Port Hudson formed the southern end of the Confederate defenses along the
      Mississippi River. Vicksburg, 150 miles to the north by river, was the
      northern anchor of this connection between the heartland of the Confederacy
      and the Trans-Mississippi. The guns overlooking the river at both strongholds
      were formidable, well-placed and posed a distinct threat to the ships of the
      United States Navy. Once that navy gained control of the entire Mississippi
      River, the Confederacy would be cut in two. Not only would her military
      forces be divided, but the transportation of vital supplies such as salt,
      cattle and horses moving eastward, and arms and munitions moving westward,
      would be halted. Thus the importance of maintaining control of at least this
      much of the Mississippi River can be clearly seen.

      Confederates Greatly Outnumbered

      The siege of Port Hudson began on May 23, 1863, and pitted roughly 30,000
      Union troops against 6,800 Confederates under the command of Major General
      Franklin Gardner. On the morning of May 27 and again on June 14, the Union
      Army under the command of Major General Nathaniel P. Banks launched ferocious
      assaults against the four-and-one-half-mile long string of fortifications
      protecting the river batteries near Port Hudson. These actions constituted
      some of the most severe and bloodiest fighting of the entire Civil War, and
      places such as Fort Desperate, the Priest Cap, Slaughter's Field and the
      Citadel became names forever etched in the pages of American Civil War
      history.


      Fort Desperate
      As the siege continued into July, the Confederates had nearly exhausted their
      ammunition and were reduced to eating mules, horses and rats. When word
      reached Gardner that Vicksburg had surrendered, he realized that his
      situation was hopeless and nothing could be gained by continuing the defense
      of Port Hudson. Surrender terms were negotiated, and on July 9, 1863, after
      forty-eight-days and thousands of casualties, the Union army entered Port
      Hudson.

      The surrender of the garrison was the final blow in a week of catastrophe for
      the Confederacy. On July 3 General Robert E. Lee's second invasion of the
      North was turned back at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The following day
      Vicksburg surrendered, and the Confederate drive through Arkansas was halted
      at Helena. Five days later came the surrender of Port Hudson. It was a week
      of crushing defeat, one from which the Confederacy would never recover.

      48-Day Siege

      The importance of the siege of Port Hudson must not be overlooked. In Civil
      War history its significance lies in the fact that it was the last
      Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River, the control of which was one
      of the primary goals on both sides. Port Hudson was the longest siege in
      American military history. The garrison withstood the hardships for 48
      consecutive days without relief from the outside. Port Hudson is significant
      for another reason too, for it was here that black soldiers in the regular
      United States Army first participated in an assault.
    • DAP4477575@aol.com
      Hi I am new to this kind of board and hope the following is not out of order but since we are talking about touring some of the battle fields I will jump in
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 13, 1999
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        Hi
        I am new to this kind of board and hope the following is not out of order but
        since we are talking about touring some of the battle fields I will jump in
        with one of the few I have visited. Port Hudson has some meaning to me for I
        had an ancestor there. When I visited the site in January, I was the only one
        there, Which may have added to the surreal feeling of being there. The
        visitor center has a short film on the history and the trails that you walk.
        As with many of the CW battle fields, This one is not as it was in 1863 much
        of the land is privately owned and off limits to the visitor and the
        Mississippi River has changed course over the last 135 years. I have included
        a short history and a statistic of the siege I found.

        The heaviest numerical loss during any single battle was at Gettysburg where
        40,322 Americans were killed or wounded. On the Union side 21 per cent of
        those engaged were killed or wounded, in the Confederate ranks 30 per cent -
        the largest percentage of Confederates hit in any battle. The largest
        percentage of Union soldiers hit in battle was at Port Hudson in May 1863,
        where 26.7 per cent of those engaged were killed or wounded.

        Extracted from CIVIL WAR HANDBOOK by W H Price. A Civil War Research


        The following text comes from the brochure given at the Port Hudson State
        Commemorative Area.


        Port Hudson State Commemorative Area

        This area's geographic location as a potential military post had first been
        noted by the British a century before the American Civil War. Port Hudson was
        situated high on the bluffs overlooking a substantial bend in the river which
        required ships passing downstream to reduce speed. Fighting the current
        upstream was always a slow, painstaking process. As such, the strategic
        importance of Port Hudson was quickly grasped by Confederate authorities
        following the fall of New Orleans. The terrain along the east bank of the
        Mississippi River abounded with natural ravines which could be easily adapted
        as a defensive perimeter, and earthworks joining these could be readily
        constructed so as to make the place virtually impregnable. It is this
        environment and setting which led to the siege of Port Hudson.

        From the standpoint of military strategy, the Confederate fortifications at
        Port Hudson formed the southern end of the Confederate defenses along the
        Mississippi River. Vicksburg, 150 miles to the north by river, was the
        northern anchor of this connection between the heartland of the Confederacy
        and the Trans-Mississippi. The guns overlooking the river at both strongholds
        were formidable, well-placed and posed a distinct threat to the ships of the
        United States Navy. Once that navy gained control of the entire Mississippi
        River, the Confederacy would be cut in two. Not only would her military
        forces be divided, but the transportation of vital supplies such as salt,
        cattle and horses moving eastward, and arms and munitions moving westward,
        would be halted. Thus the importance of maintaining control of at least this
        much of the Mississippi River can be clearly seen.

        Confederates Greatly Outnumbered

        The siege of Port Hudson began on May 23, 1863, and pitted roughly 30,000
        Union troops against 6,800 Confederates under the command of Major General
        Franklin Gardner. On the morning of May 27 and again on June 14, the Union
        Army under the command of Major General Nathaniel P. Banks launched ferocious
        assaults against the four-and-one-half-mile long string of fortifications
        protecting the river batteries near Port Hudson. These actions constituted
        some of the most severe and bloodiest fighting of the entire Civil War, and
        places such as Fort Desperate, the Priest Cap, Slaughter's Field and the
        Citadel became names forever etched in the pages of American Civil War
        history.


        Fort Desperate
        As the siege continued into July, the Confederates had nearly exhausted their
        ammunition and were reduced to eating mules, horses and rats. When word
        reached Gardner that Vicksburg had surrendered, he realized that his
        situation was hopeless and nothing could be gained by continuing the defense
        of Port Hudson. Surrender terms were negotiated, and on July 9, 1863, after
        forty-eight-days and thousands of casualties, the Union army entered Port
        Hudson.

        The surrender of the garrison was the final blow in a week of catastrophe for
        the Confederacy. On July 3 General Robert E. Lee's second invasion of the
        North was turned back at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The following day
        Vicksburg surrendered, and the Confederate drive through Arkansas was halted
        at Helena. Five days later came the surrender of Port Hudson. It was a week
        of crushing defeat, one from which the Confederacy would never recover.

        48-Day Siege

        The importance of the siege of Port Hudson must not be overlooked. In Civil
        War history its significance lies in the fact that it was the last
        Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River, the control of which was one
        of the primary goals on both sides. Port Hudson was the longest siege in
        American military history. The garrison withstood the hardships for 48
        consecutive days without relief from the outside. Port Hudson is significant
        for another reason too, for it was here that black soldiers in the regular
        United States Army first participated in an assault.
      • Dick Weeks
        ... Just a great post! Since this group is just getting started I feel that if I make a comment here and there it might help those that have never belonged to
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 13, 1999
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          DAP4477575@... wrote:
          >
          > Hi
          > I am new to this kind of board and hope the following is not out of order but
          > since we are talking about touring some of the battle fields I will jump in
          > with one of the few I have visited. Port Hudson has some meaning to me for I
          > had an ancestor there. When I visited the site in January, I was the only one
          > there, Which may have added to the surreal feeling of being there. The
          > visitor center has a short film on the history and the trails that you walk.

          Just a great post!

          Since this group is just getting started I feel that if I make a comment
          here and there it might help those that have never belonged to a
          "Discussion Group" before understand the value of one.

          It is not necessary that one be an expert in an area to contribute. For
          instance, I'll bet there aren't two other people in the group that have
          the brochure from the Port Hudson State Commemorative Area. I know I
          sure as heck don't! I have learned a lot from this one post. A few posts
          back, Laurie posted something on New Orleans from Boatner's Dictionary
          of the Civil War. Even though this is a very popular reference document,
          I would guess less than half in the group have it. I hadn't even thought
          to look there.

          I hope that in time this group builds itself into the best of it's kind
          on the the internet. We can only do that if folks get over the initial
          shyness of posting. If you have an opinion on something that someone has
          said, or even if it hasn't been said, sing out. Knowing this bunch they
          are not shy about answering. Just remember, this is history we are
          discussing, not some made up nonsense.

          By the way, if some of you writers out there would like to contribute an
          essay feel free. Send it to me and I will put it on the groups homepage.
          These things contribute an awful lot.

          I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
          Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
          http://www.civilwarhome.com
        • Dick Weeks
          ... Just a great post! Since this group is just getting started I feel that if I make a comment here and there it might help those that have never belonged to
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 13, 1999
          • 0 Attachment
            DAP4477575@... wrote:
            >
            > Hi
            > I am new to this kind of board and hope the following is not out of order but
            > since we are talking about touring some of the battle fields I will jump in
            > with one of the few I have visited. Port Hudson has some meaning to me for I
            > had an ancestor there. When I visited the site in January, I was the only one
            > there, Which may have added to the surreal feeling of being there. The
            > visitor center has a short film on the history and the trails that you walk.

            Just a great post!

            Since this group is just getting started I feel that if I make a comment
            here and there it might help those that have never belonged to a
            "Discussion Group" before understand the value of one.

            It is not necessary that one be an expert in an area to contribute. For
            instance, I'll bet there aren't two other people in the group that have
            the brochure from the Port Hudson State Commemorative Area. I know I
            sure as heck don't! I have learned a lot from this one post. A few posts
            back, Laurie posted something on New Orleans from Boatner's Dictionary
            of the Civil War. Even though this is a very popular reference document,
            I would guess less than half in the group have it. I hadn't even thought
            to look there.

            I hope that in time this group builds itself into the best of it's kind
            on the the internet. We can only do that if folks get over the initial
            shyness of posting. If you have an opinion on something that someone has
            said, or even if it hasn't been said, sing out. Knowing this bunch they
            are not shy about answering. Just remember, this is history we are
            discussing, not some made up nonsense.

            By the way, if some of you writers out there would like to contribute an
            essay feel free. Send it to me and I will put it on the groups homepage.
            These things contribute an awful lot.

            I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
            Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
            http://www.civilwarhome.com
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