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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Artillery

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  • Donald Pontious
    ... As a side, a president s casket is put on a caisson, which is attached to a limber, which is pulled by the horses, just like in the war, except, of course,
    Message 1 of 6 , May 3, 2005
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      On 5/3/05, Jeff <jblake47@...> wrote:
      > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@a... wrote:
      > > Just a small question. I had understood that the limber, with its
      > team,
      > > pulled the gun. Caissons were separate units Had they been pulling
      > guns, they would
      > > be limbers. Essentially, caissons were ammo boxes following a
      > particular gun
      > > in a particular battery.
      > >
      > > So we have an ammunition box (a caisson), if pulling a gun, is a
      > limber . It
      > > was a caisson if it was not attached to a gun, but a separate or
      > dual entity
      > > carrying the same ammunition as a limber. Okay. Limber and gun
      > pulled by one
      > > team. Caisson(s) carried by another team. Now we have three
      > ammunition boxes per
      > > gun (each ammunition box, limber or caisson, carried the same
      > supply). I'm
      > > fairly certain that's how the regulation battery (6 guns) went into
      > formation --
      > > at least 72 horses. I'm so confused.
      >
      > The six-horse team pulls a limber and the limber contains one
      > ammunition box. Each gun has two limbers, one pulls the gun and the
      > other pulls the caisson. The caisson can be viewed as a double
      > limber with spare parts. You can always recognize the caisson
      > because it has a spare wheel attached to it's rear. Each gun was
      > suplied with 4 limber boxes of ammunition.
      >
      > Thus each gun had two limbers which would alternately bring forward a
      > single box of ammunition and return to the caisson for another box as
      > needed. The limbers were light enough to be able to be maneuvered by
      > the gun crews if necessary.
      >
      > Jeff

      As a side, a president's casket is put on a caisson, which is attached
      to a limber, which is pulled by the horses, just like in the war,
      except, of course, there is no ammunition chests.
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