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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Union Artillery

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  • GnrlJEJohnston@aol.com
    In a message dated 5/2/2005 3:45:17 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, jblake47@yahoo.com writes: Canister shot larger than 1.0 caliber were really grape shot used
    Message 1 of 66 , May 2, 2005
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      In a message dated 5/2/2005 3:45:17 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, jblake47@... writes:
      "Canister" shot larger than 1.0 caliber were really grape shot used
      in naval guns to strip ships of their rigging.  The balls needed to
      be bigger to affect a more damaging effect on a more solid target
      than flesh and bone.
      However, not common, but grape shot was used by ground batteries doing horrendous damage to the advancing enemy.

      Confederate

      Stand of grape

       

      DIAMETER:

        4.60 inches
      GUN:  12-pounder smoothbore, 4.62-inch caliber
      LENGTH:  5 13/16 inches to top plate
      WEIGHT:  14 pounds 6 ounces
      CONSTRUCTION:  Grape shot
      SABOT:  None
      FUZING:  None
      12-pounder Stand of Grape
      This non-excavated specimen is referred to as a stand of grape. The Federal forces discontinued the 12-pounder stand of grape prior to 1861 and replaced it with canister. The shot used in canisters were large enough to be effective, and the canister balls possessed the advantage of striking a great many more points on impact than grape. When fired, the center bolt would break free, sending nine iron grape shot, two rings, and two plates flying at their intended target.  Stands of grape are also found in the following field calibers: 18-pounder (5.3-inch caliber), and 24-pounder (5.82-inch caliber). Note the crude mold seams on the iron balls which point to Confederate manufacture. Three complete 12-pounder stands were recovered from Vicksburg, Mississippi. Complete excavated specimens are extremely rare.
       

      Pre-war Federal

      Quilted grape

       

      DIAMETER:

        2.74 inches
      GUN:  3-pounder smoothbore, 2.9-inch caliber
      LENGTH:  8 inches
      WEIGHT:  8 pounds 12 ounces
      CONSTRUCTION:  Quilted grape
      SABOT:  Wooden cylinder
      FUZING:  None
      3-pounder Quilted Grape Shot
      This is an example of a pre-war grape shot projectile. It consisted of a wooden base with a rod centered like a bolt around which lead balls were piled in tiers. The above arrangement was then completely enclosed in canvas, and a heavy twine (sometimes wire) was stitched between the balls. This gave the projectile its distinctive quilted-like appearance and common name quilted grape. The book known as Cooper's Tactics, 1845 Edition, stated that the Federal forces continued the use of the 3-pounder smoothbore cannon into the 1820's as a light field artillery piece. According to Louis De Tousard's American Artillerist's Companion, 1809 Edition; and Duane's Military Dictionary, 1810 Edition; they considered, based on their tests, that the 3- and 4-pounder quilted grape shot was accurate and dependable at 400-500 yards. Less than 400 yards case-shot and canister were more effective, primarily, because of the dispersement. The early manufactured quilted grape contained lead balls. The lead balls deformed to much upon the ignition of the powder charge. Lead balls were later replace with iron. This example contains thirty-five one-inch lead balls and is located in the West Point Military Academy Museum.
       
      JEJ
    • Donald Pontious
      ... A Napoleon is a 12pdr, period, not a 6pdr or 20 pdr. The term 12pdr refers to the weight of the solid shot that the smooth bore cannon used.
      Message 66 of 66 , May 3, 2005
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        On 5/3/05, hank9174 <clarkc@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hmmm, that's strange, I always thought the term Napolean meant the
        > > style of gun, not it's caliber. I could have even bet that the 6#
        > > Napolean was also a common gun on the field.
        > >
        >
        > The Napoleon style (stubby bronze tubes) did not scale well. A 12
        > pounder is an incredibly heavy load.
        >
        > There are 20-lb Parrotts, which are rifled, but no 20-lb Napoleons
        > which are smoothbores...
        >
        > HankC

        A Napoleon is a 12pdr, period, not a 6pdr or 20 pdr. The term "12pdr"
        refers to the weight of the solid shot that the smooth bore cannon
        used.
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