Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Union Artillery

Expand Messages
  • oneplez
    ... you could ... by a ... cavity in a ... it could ... course. ... What s the calibeer of the cannister? Don ... thing, ... with ... at ... as a
    Message 1 of 66 , May 2, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Dick Weeks" <shotgun@c...>
      wrote:
      > Cannister is considerably larger than a musket ball. I'm not sure
      you could
      > really mistake someone being hit by cannister and someone being hit
      by a
      > musket ball. Looks to me like cannister would make a fair size
      cavity in a
      > person. Now, I can see that if someone was hit by case shot that
      it could
      > be very easily be mistaken for a musket hit. Just my opinion of
      course.
      >
      > I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
      > Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
      > http://www.civilwarhome.com
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "carlw4514" <carlw4514@y...>
      > To: <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>

      What's the calibeer of the cannister?

      Don


      > Sent: Monday, May 02, 2005 6:05 AM
      > Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Union Artillery
      >
      >
      > > I have long suspected the under-reporting is correct. For one
      thing,
      > > am I correct in thinking that to be hit by canister is to be hit
      with
      > > musket ball, and would not look different unless really peppered
      at
      > > close range? .... so to someone tallying statistics, it goes down
      as a
      > > KIA by musket ball.
      > >
      > >
      > > > Artillery, also a great noise but
      > > > somewhat less smoke simply because of the
      > > > concentration, issued forth canister that slaughtered
      > > > scores, great balls that sliced men and animals in
      > > > two, and generally did so much destruction for their
      > > > less-frequent fire that it was hard to comprehend the
      > > > totality of it all, thus it was often underreported.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
    • Donald Pontious
      ... A Napoleon is a 12pdr, period, not a 6pdr or 20 pdr. The term 12pdr refers to the weight of the solid shot that the smooth bore cannon used.
      Message 66 of 66 , May 3, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        On 5/3/05, hank9174 <clarkc@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hmmm, that's strange, I always thought the term Napolean meant the
        > > style of gun, not it's caliber. I could have even bet that the 6#
        > > Napolean was also a common gun on the field.
        > >
        >
        > The Napoleon style (stubby bronze tubes) did not scale well. A 12
        > pounder is an incredibly heavy load.
        >
        > There are 20-lb Parrotts, which are rifled, but no 20-lb Napoleons
        > which are smoothbores...
        >
        > HankC

        A Napoleon is a 12pdr, period, not a 6pdr or 20 pdr. The term "12pdr"
        refers to the weight of the solid shot that the smooth bore cannon
        used.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.