Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[civilwarwest] Your Newest Member Speaks

Expand Messages
  • Hartshje@aol.com
    Hello All, I have just joined your wonderful little group, and would like very much to hear from any of you very soon. I just looked at the vote you recently
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 28, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello All,

      I have just joined your wonderful little group, and would like very much to
      hear from any of you very soon.

      I just looked at the vote you recently took on the turning point of the war.
      It was very interesting. I wish I had known about this site earlier.
      Anyway, for what it's worth, I would like to express my opinion on the
      subject.

      Let me just venture to say that there were only two real chances for the
      Confederacy to actually "WIN" the war. One was at Gettysburg, where the
      destruction of the Army of the Potomac would have resulted in the capture of
      Washington, and possibly other major northern cities in the east, and the
      North would have sued for peace. After Lee's defeat here, the Army of N.
      Virginia no longer had the strength to decisively defeat their counterparts.

      The other chance was at Chickamauga, where the Army of the Cumberland nearly
      WAS destroyed by the combination of Confederate forces from both the Eastern
      & Western theaters. I believe the true turning point of the war came when
      Braxton Bragg failed to properly followup his victory here, and force the
      abandonment of Chattanooga. Vigorous action at this point, prior to the
      arrival of heavy Union reinforcements, would most likely have completed the
      destruction or capture of that Union army, and would have reversed most of
      the gains the North had made from over two years of fighting in the West.
      After Bragg's consequent defeat by Grant at Chattanooga, the South's
      offensive power waned rapidly.

      I agree that Vicksburg was a crippling blow to the Confederacy, but I don't
      think it was a mortal one. The Union forces in the West were still fighting
      piecemeal at that point, and could still be defeated individually, as
      evidenced by Chickamauga. What do you all think of this view?
    • Hartshje@aol.com
      Hello All, I have just joined your wonderful little group, and would like very much to hear from any of you very soon. I just looked at the vote you recently
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 28, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello All,

        I have just joined your wonderful little group, and would like very much to
        hear from any of you very soon.

        I just looked at the vote you recently took on the turning point of the war.
        It was very interesting. I wish I had known about this site earlier.
        Anyway, for what it's worth, I would like to express my opinion on the
        subject.

        Let me just venture to say that there were only two real chances for the
        Confederacy to actually "WIN" the war. One was at Gettysburg, where the
        destruction of the Army of the Potomac would have resulted in the capture of
        Washington, and possibly other major northern cities in the east, and the
        North would have sued for peace. After Lee's defeat here, the Army of N.
        Virginia no longer had the strength to decisively defeat their counterparts.

        The other chance was at Chickamauga, where the Army of the Cumberland nearly
        WAS destroyed by the combination of Confederate forces from both the Eastern
        & Western theaters. I believe the true turning point of the war came when
        Braxton Bragg failed to properly followup his victory here, and force the
        abandonment of Chattanooga. Vigorous action at this point, prior to the
        arrival of heavy Union reinforcements, would most likely have completed the
        destruction or capture of that Union army, and would have reversed most of
        the gains the North had made from over two years of fighting in the West.
        After Bragg's consequent defeat by Grant at Chattanooga, the South's
        offensive power waned rapidly.

        I agree that Vicksburg was a crippling blow to the Confederacy, but I don't
        think it was a mortal one. The Union forces in the West were still fighting
        piecemeal at that point, and could still be defeated individually, as
        evidenced by Chickamauga. What do you all think of this view?
      • ECM777@aol.com
        I agree with your assessment of Chickamauga. I strongly feel Chickamauga could have been the turning point if Bragg had been aggressive enough. Regards,
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 29, 1999
        • 0 Attachment
          I agree with your assessment of Chickamauga. I strongly feel Chickamauga
          could have been the turning point if Bragg had been aggressive enough.
          Regards,
          Colleen
        • ECM777@aol.com
          I agree with your assessment of Chickamauga. I strongly feel Chickamauga could have been the turning point if Bragg had been aggressive enough. Regards,
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 29, 1999
          • 0 Attachment
            I agree with your assessment of Chickamauga. I strongly feel Chickamauga
            could have been the turning point if Bragg had been aggressive enough.
            Regards,
            Colleen
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.