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A Mr. Rose point well taken.

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  • aot1952
    Dear Pards- As I have stated, for what little it is worth, Mr. Rose has not yet convinced me of his point that USG was purposely untruthful in his book
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 7, 2005
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      Dear Pards-
      As I have stated, for what little it is worth, Mr. Rose has not yet
      convinced me of his point that USG was purposely untruthful in his
      book regarding this incident, Mr. Rose I do think raises another
      very valid point. Specifically, Mr. Rose stated that General
      Fremont, deserved more credit than popular history has given, for
      some of his decisions during his tenure in command at St. Louis.
      While popular history tends to pass Fremont's tenure off as pretty
      much an ameturistic (sp?)joke characterised by out of control and
      corrupt spending, humorous use of foreign born officers, and
      allegedly outlandish reckless unauthorized emancipation declarations-
      I sometimes wonder just how much of Fremont's treatment is the
      product of politically motivated contemporary press and how much is
      the product of real critical historical analysis or even Lincoln's
      artful destruction of a potentially dangerous political rival.
      ISTM that arguments can be fashioned that Fremont did lay the
      organizational and command ground work for the Union's successes in
      the first quarter of 1862. Also Fremont did authorize, I think, the
      early development of the Union's 'brown water navy' and the
      construction of the decisive River Iron Clads. In addition,
      Fremont's tenure saw the cementing of the Western European
      Immigrants to the Union cause (maybe all those German and Slavic
      officers with the funny names had some influence?)- something that
      did not occur in the East. Finally, Fremont was certainly not the
      ONLY Union officer who apparently honestly felt Slave Emancipation
      was a real moral and military necessity after all Lincoln himself
      came to that conclusion within 10 months and successfully claimed
      all the historical and political credit. Was the comic part of this
      story that Fremont sent his wife instead of himself to argue the
      point face to face with the President?
      Just some food for thought-
      I certainly could be all wrong-
      Wakefield
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