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Re: Orders to occupy Paducah

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  • William H Keene
    ... At the time Grant reported that local sources indicated that the enemy had about 3,800 men 16 miles away and that Tilgman and his staff had left Paducah
    Message 1 of 121 , Apr 1 7:42 AM
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "josepharose" <josepharose@y...>
      wrote:
      > ... As to the question
      > of whether Grant was correct in claiming his movement's "anticipating
      > the enemy by probably not over six or eight hours," he apparently
      > wasn't. Grant thought the enemy was some 16 miles away (or about 6-8
      > hours of marching). It appears that the enemy was not advancing on
      > Paducah and Grant should have know about it by the time he wrote his
      > memoirs.


      At the time Grant reported that local sources indicated that the enemy
      had about 3,800 men 16 miles away and that Tilgman and his staff had
      left Paducah right before Grant arrived. I thnk that we now know that
      Polk and Pillow did not move toward Paducha at the time. But the
      alleged presence of Tilghman in Paducah suggests that the forces Grant
      kearned of may have been Kentucky troops. I am nost so sure how 25
      years later Grant should have determined whether this was the case or
      not.
    • CAMPAIGN62@AOL.COM
      I found it. OR Vol 7 Pg 571 McCellan to Halleck and Buell A deserter just in from the rebels, says that .... he heard officers say that Beauregaed was
      Message 121 of 121 , Apr 14 3:54 PM
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        I found it. OR Vol 7 Pg 571 McCellan to Halleck and Buell " A deserter just
        in from the rebels, says that .... he heard officers say that Beauregaed was
        under orders to go to
        Kentucky with fifteen regiments from the Army of the Potomac.(Jan.29, 1862).

        Halleck replied on Jan 30. "Your telegraph regarding Beauregard is received.
        General Grant and Commodore Foote will be ordered to immediately advance, and
        to reduce and hold Fort Henry, on the Tennessee river.

        I remain, Sir, your most humble servant.
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