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Naval History - CSS ARKANSAS

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  • tlind1@yahoo.com
    We all know that the CSS VIRGINIA was probably that most well known confederate iron clad --- but perhaps the CSS ARKANSAS faced greater odds.
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 28 11:39 AM
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      We all know that the CSS VIRGINIA was probably that most well known
      confederate iron clad --- but perhaps the CSS ARKANSAS faced greater
      odds.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CSS_Arkansas

      Kindest Regards,
      Tracey
    • carlw4514
      Tracey, a quote from the attached: The greatest naval force ever assembled in the western hemisphere had been dispersed by a hastily built gunboat constructed
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 28 12:26 PM
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        Tracey, a quote from the attached:

        "The greatest naval force ever assembled in the western hemisphere had
        been dispersed by a hastily built gunboat constructed in a swamp, with
        scrap metal, and manned by a handful of volunteer soldiers. One of the
        most incredible feats in naval history."

        Carl

        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, tlind1@y... wrote:
        >
        > We all know that the CSS VIRGINIA was probably that most well known
        > confederate iron clad --- but perhaps the CSS ARKANSAS faced greater
        > odds.
        >
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CSS_Arkansas
        >
        > Kindest Regards,
        > Tracey
      • CAMPAIGN62@AOL.COM
        Imagine having to run through an entire fleet. And doing it sucessfully. I agree.`Monitor vs.` MerrimacK is better known, but that s just the Eastern bias in
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 28 6:07 PM
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          Imagine having to run through an entire fleet. And doing it sucessfully. I
          agree.`Monitor vs.`"MerrimacK" is better known, but that's just the Eastern bias
          in Civil war Studies.
        • Ray Todd Knight
          ... On the night of July 15, 1862 Lt. Robert Ballard Mathews and six other members of Cobb s Battery of the Orphan Brigade manned a gun on the Arkansas for
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 28 7:21 PM
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            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, tlind1@y... wrote:
            >
            > We all know that the CSS VIRGINIA was probably that most well known
            > confederate iron clad --- but perhaps the CSS ARKANSAS faced greater
            > odds.
            >
            > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CSS_Arkansas
            >
            > Kindest Regards,
            > Tracey

            On the night of July 15, 1862 Lt. Robert Ballard Mathews and six other
            members of Cobb's Battery of the Orphan Brigade manned a gun on the
            Arkansas for it's nightly run against the Federal gunboats.
            From the ORs

            " HEADQUARTERS GRACEY'S [COBB'S] BATTERY,
            July 17, 1862.

            [Brigadier General W. PRESTON:]

            GENERAL: In reply inquires concerning the volunteers from our battery
            "to assist in fighting the ram Arkansas" against the lower fleet, I
            report as follows: On the 15th instant, about 4p. m., Lieutenant [H.
            P.] Wallace, of your staff, cameo our battery and stated that you
            desired 12 volunteers from your brigade to fill the place of the
            wounded and dead in the crew of the ram. Twelve members of the
            battery, besides myself, immediately volunteered to go, but our
            commanding office refusing to permit so many of us to leave, as it
            would reduce the strength of his battery, resorted to a ballot to see
            who the lucky ones might be, which resulted as follows: Sergt. James
            Bridndley, Corpl. John Leonard, Privates Benjamin [G.] Moore, Daniel
            Black, and Charley Thronton, nd Sergt. T. Watts. As soon as the
            volunteers were ready to move, which was about five minutes after, I
            took the men and reported myself and command to Captain Brown, of the
            ram, as being a portion of the number required of your brigade.
            Captain Brown immediately assigned us to a gun. I stated to Captain
            Brown that we had come to assist him to fight the lower fleet that
            evening, and that we had come to assist him to fight the lower fleet
            that evening, and that as my whole experience in artillery was
            confined to light filed pieces, except what I had learned from the
            morning engagement with the enemy's boats, would prefer that he would
            place some officer in charge that had more experience, and I would
            fight as a private, which was done, as he placed Midshipman [D. M.]
            Scales in charge. We worked the gun throughout the engagement to the
            best of our abilities. After the engagement was over, I asked the
            first lieutenant if they needed our services any more. he conducted me
            to Captain brown, who stated that he had no further use for us, and
            that he was very grateful for our services, and that we could return
            to our camp. I asked him then for the countersign; he did not have it.
            I asked General Breckinridge's son for it, who was standing by during
            my conversation with Captain Brown; he not having it, was compelled to
            remain in town until morning, when we returned to our battery. These
            are all the circumstances connected with our aquatic expedition, and
            trust that they are of such a character as will relieve your mind of
            any impression you may have received of myself or any of those under
            my command acting in any way except at Kentuckians have always and
            will continue to act before the enemy, whether on land or water.

            I am, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

            R. B. MATHEWS,

            First Lieutenant Cobb's Battery. "

            Todd
          • basecat1@aol.com
            In a message dated 2/28/2005 9:08:49 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, CAMPAIGN62@AOL.COM writes: Imagine having to run through an entire fleet. And doing it
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 28 8:18 PM
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              In a message dated 2/28/2005 9:08:49 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, CAMPAIGN62@... writes:
              Imagine having to run through an entire fleet. And doing it sucessfully. I
              agree.`Monitor vs.`"MerrimacK" is better known, but that's just the Eastern bias
              in Civil war Studies.
              Just a thought here about the Arkansas, the ship did not fail, but was put in a no win situation by Van Dorn.  Amazing to me, that it was ordered to join in on the fight at Baton Rouge, and yet the commander had no clue as to the skeleton crew the ship had, or any knowledge that it was not sufficiently repaired after its first runin with the Union Navy.
               
              Regards from the Garden State,
               
              Steve Basic
            • tlind1@yahoo.com
              Van Dorn was never the brightest..just read any book on Pea Ridge..other than a brief victory at Holly Springs...he was pretty much a failure...a lot of people
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 1, 2005
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                Van Dorn was never the brightest..just read any book on Pea
                Ridge..other than a brief victory at Holly Springs...he was pretty
                much a failure...a lot of people contribute the fall of Vicksburg to
                Pemberton but the seeds were sown with Van Dorn..

                As far as the Arkansas...General Brown,the commander, was ill when
                he learned of Van Dorn sending the Arkansas to Baton Rouge. He left
                his sick bed to try and stop the Arkansas but was too late..

                Just another example of failed leadership in the West.

                Kindest Regards,
                Tracy






                --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, basecat1@a... wrote:
                >
                > In a message dated 2/28/2005 9:08:49 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                > CAMPAIGN62@A... writes:
                >
                > Imagine having to run through an entire fleet. And doing it
                sucessfully. I
                > agree.`Monitor vs.`"MerrimacK" is better known, but that's just
                the Eastern
                > bias
                > in Civil war Studies.
                >
                >
                >
                > Just a thought here about the Arkansas, the ship did not fail, but
                was put in
                > a no win situation by Van Dorn. Amazing to me, that it was
                ordered to join
                > in on the fight at Baton Rouge, and yet the commander had no clue
                as to the
                > skeleton crew the ship had, or any knowledge that it was not
                sufficiently
                > repaired after its first runin with the Union Navy.
                >
                > Regards from the Garden State,
                >
                > Steve Basic
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