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Re: Books

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  • civilwarlady@yahoo.com
    ... thing in the book all depends on what the reader is expecting. I read both kinds myself. Heck, I subscribe to the Civil War Times (Illustrated) and that
    Message 1 of 69 , Dec 31, 2004
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Dick Weeks" <shotgun@c...>
      wrote:
      > JEJ, I would think whether it is really necessary to document every
      thing in the book all depends on what the reader is expecting. I
      read both kinds myself. Heck, I subscribe to the Civil War Times
      (Illustrated) and that certainly does not have footnotes/endnotes.
      However, I must admit because of my website, I answer a lot of
      questions on the Civil War on a daily basis, I do not reference any
      book/magazine that does not tell me where the information came from.
      Back in the middle 90's when I first started my website I had not
      thought that much about whether a book was well documented or not.
      Not being a professional historian I just read for pleasure.
      However, with the advent of the Internet and books/documents on CD
      and having to answer a lot of questions on the Civil War I have
      greatly changed my reading habits and that may not be all good. Now
      I have my books divided into two categories, (1) Bedside reader.
      Those are the ones that do not have footnotes/endnotes and can be
      read without any reference to outside documentation (i.e. Shelby
      Foote, Jeff Shaara, Michael Shaara, Civil War Times, etc.) and I can
      read them at my lesiure. (2) Library Reader. Those that have
      footnotes/endnotes and require me to either take notes for later
      reference or look the dang thing up right then. By the way, I only
      look up those areas that appear somewhat questionable to me. The
      others I just take their word for it. Needless to say I do not get
      as much reading done as I used to :-) Bear in mind, that my #2 will
      only work if you have a good Civil War Library. If you do not have
      one, you can just make sure that the book has footnotes/endnotes and
      hope the author has done his/her homework.
      >
      > By the way, I am a huge fan of Shelby Foote, but I do not use his
      work as reference. Rather I use it as a learning tool to point me in
      the direction I need to go.
      >
      > You folks have a GREAT NEW YEAR!!
      >
      > I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
      > Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
      > http://www.civilwarhome.com

      Fellas my personal philosophy when it comes to this question is to
      read as wide a variety of material as possible and, taking all of the
      information and with the knowledge you already accept as accurate,
      make your decision as to the validity or, more importantly, the value
      of the new information. In other words, if you choose to take a
      writer at his word without the benefits of redoing all of his
      research by checking sources, etc., you are not following
      blindly...you have an accumulation of knowledge to work with. You
      know when things strike you as accurate and when its a new piece of
      information that you need to explore. Shelby Foote's series is an in
      depth popular history of the Civil War. It is well researched. Some
      folks can't get past the idea that he is NOT a historian. If his set
      was the ONLY thing I chose to ever read about the Civil War, I'd get
      a pretty good general idea of what went on. But because I read
      everything I can get my hands on, I can take his work in context.
      I happen to like Foote. In fact, a few years ago they issued the 40th
      anniversary edition of his book as a 14 volume illustrated version
      ala Time-Life. It's great!

      I think sometimes people get too caught up in this "professional
      historian" versus "historian" or "Authority". The purpose of a
      professional historian is vastly different than that of a local
      historian or an "expert" in a certain aspect of the war, or
      an "amatuer". And to me, all of them have something of great value
      to add to my accumlated knowledge. That is why, IMHO, we are all
      historians of a sort. I do not take all of the professional and
      academic credentials too seriously; after all....like us, they
      weren't there and so what we read is their interpretation. None of us
      have every heard Mozart perform, but we have heard many
      interpretations of his music. If it is well done and accurate, there
      is no way to know if that artists interpretation of the music is what
      Mozart intended. I tend to view history in the same way.

      Anne
      www.geocities.com/civilwarlady

      Happy New Year!!





      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: GnrlJEJohnston@a...
      > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, December 31, 2004 5:04 PM
      > Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Re: Books
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 12/31/2004 7:10:59 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      meheath@m... writes:
      > if a reader does not know where a
      > fact/claim/opinion/conclusion came from, the evidence upon
      which it is
      > based, then that reader has no way to verify the writer's
      statement; the
      > statement becomes merely an assertion of belief, having no more
      weight or
      > merit than anyone else's assertion.
      > As an amateur author, I often wondered why so many footnotes and
      documentation's are needed on topics that are so well known and have
      been documented hundreds of times in the past already. In reading a
      book, such as one on the war that we have been studying, how many
      times do we read each and every footnote or documentation. I can see
      documenting a statement given by a person, but do we have to document
      each and every detail on well known battles. I salute those writers
      that have done so for I know it is laborious to document each and
      everything, but is it really necessary.
      >
      > JEJ
      >
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    • Bob Taubman
      I really liked Sherman s Horsemen, by Evans along with those you have mentioned.  Castel s Decision in the West is an excellent read as is Embrace an Angry
      Message 69 of 69 , Dec 17, 2010
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        I really liked Sherman's Horsemen, by Evans along with those you have mentioned.  Castel's Decision in the West is an excellent read as is Embrace an Angry Wind, The Confederacy's Last Hurrah:  Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville by Wiley Sword. 


        From: "pete@..." <pete@...>
        To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, December 12, 2010 10:45:14 AM
        Subject: RE: [civilwarwest] Books

        Wiley Sword and Larry Daniels' books on Shiloh
        Connelly ARMY OF THE HEARTLAND and AUTUMN OF GLORY
        Castel DECISION IN THE WEST THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN
        Peter Cozzens books on Stones River (Murfreesboro) and Iuka & Corinth
        Horn THE DECISIVE BATTLE OF NASHVILLE
        Davis SHERMAN'S MARCH TO THE SEA
        Miers THE WEB OF VICTORY (Vicksburg)
        Horn THE ARMY OF TENNESSEE
        Woodworth NOTHING BUT VICTORY THE ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE
        Sherman and Grant's MEMOIRS

        Along with Chris' question, what thoughts does the group have on WAR LIKE THE THUNDERBOLT?



        ------- Original Message -------
        From    : chris bryant[mailto:paladinsf@...]
        Sent    : 12/11/2010 5:49:02 PM
        To      : civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
        Cc      :
        Subject : RE: [civilwarwest] Books






         


           
             
             
              Been pretty slow since I subscribed;maybe everybody's on vacation?Thought I'd ask:what books do you particularly recommend on the war in the
        west?I like Thomas Lawrence Connelly;he had a lot to do with my interest in the west and I'm convinced that he was right about the relative
        importance of the theater and the small minded outlook of R.E.LEE.I've read some other books and articles but thought I'd like to hear if this list
        recommends anyone.
                                      Chris Bryant
                                      Oklahoma City


             

           
           

           
           






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