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Longstreet to the west

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  • Laurence D. Schiller
    ... Hi Bill: Consider the situation. Gettysburg is over and the armies in Va have resumed their positions. But out west, Vicksburg has now fallen and Bragg has
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 2, 2004
      At 10:56 AM +0000 9/1/04, civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com wrote:
      > From: "William Gower" <billgower@...>
      >Subject: RE: Confeds to the west
      >
      >Being new to this theater I need to do a lot more reading but why was it
      >felt ok to send Longstreet to the West after Gettysburg up until the time of
      >the Wilderness campaign? If Meade knew that this had occurred why didn't he
      >take advantage of it? Why did Longstreet wish to leave Lee? Was it by
      >choice or was he volunteered?

      Hi Bill:

      Consider the situation. Gettysburg is over and the armies in
      Va have resumed their positions. But out west, Vicksburg has now
      fallen and Bragg has retreated into North Georgia after abandoning
      Chattanooga. To all appearances, Rosecrans is moving and could
      shortly start towards Atlanta - it is only early September. Grant has
      no army opposing him worth speaking of. Davis has to do something to
      turn it around. Lee will probably be OK even without Longstreet
      considering his defensive position and overall success against the
      AOP. Meade isn't doing much in any case. Mostly there is just cavalry
      action here and there. Further, part of moving Longstreet was the
      idea of using the railroad to move him quickly to the Georgia front
      before Meade could react.
      In fact the move works and the result is Chickamauga. Now,
      the AOC is pinned in Chattanooga and Lincoln has Grant send the 15th
      Corps from Vicksburg and then the 11th and 12th Corps from the AOP.
      Meade, BTW, does try and do something - Mine Run - but declines to
      attack Lee's strong defensive positions. Once again, the problem for
      the Confederates is too many fronts and not enough troops. But moving
      Longstreet was a bold stroke that worked until Bragg threw away the
      fruits of the victory.

      Best,

      Laurie Schiller
      --
      Dr. Laurence Dana Schiller 19th Century Personalities
      Maitre d'Armes William Bradshaw, Co. F 2nd WI
      Head Fencing Coach George Hammitt, Co. H 104th Ill
      Department of History
      Northwestern University
      lds307@...
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