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RE: [civilwarwest] Re: Question on a pet peeve

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  • Harry Smeltzer
    Don t ever call me Mr. Smeltzer. He died in 1982. I m Harry. ... From: josepharose [mailto:josepharose@yahoo.com] Sent: Monday, August 30, 2004 10:08 PM To:
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 30, 2004
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      Don't ever call me Mr. Smeltzer. He died in 1982.

      I'm Harry.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: josepharose [mailto:josepharose@...]
      Sent: Monday, August 30, 2004 10:08 PM
      To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Question on a pet peeve

      Mr. Smeltzer:

      Some people follow a sub-rule which states that "an" can be used
      before some words beginning with an "h" when the accent of that word
      is on the second syllable.

      Thus, "an history" would still be incorrect (and it sounds it). "An
      historian" seems generally accepted. Google had about 215,00 hits
      for "a historian" and some 67,800 for "an historian."

      Joseph


      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Harry Smeltzer" <hjs21@c...>
      wrote:
      > OK, grammar time.
      >
      >
      >
      > I have only one full manual of style (Chicago, 14th ed.), and one
      or two
      > books on grammar and punctuation, so maybe there is a source out
      there to
      > contradict these. None of us would use the phrase "an history of
      the Civil
      > War", but some find it proper to refer to a historian as "an"
      historian.
      > Even some historians I know do so. But everything I have looked
      at tells me
      > that the proper usage is "a" historian. The Chicago Manual of
      Style even
      > addresses this issue fairly specifically, 6.60 stating that "Such
      forms as
      > 'an historical study' or 'an union' are not idiomatic in American
      English.
      > Before a pronounced h, long u (or eu), and such a word as one, the
      > indefinite article should be a".
      >
      >
      >
      > What's up with "an" historian? Is this some derivative of British
      usage,
      > and are Americans who use it guilty of some sort of Astor like
      affectation?
      >
      >
      >
      > Harry





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