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Re: more than one shot in a musket

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  • Art Bagley
    Greetings All... Wasn t there a technique called pulling a round, where a soldier could actually unload [unjam] his rifle by using a screw-tipped ramrod or
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 3, 2004
      Greetings All...

      Wasn't there a technique called "pulling a round," where a soldier
      could actually unload [unjam] his rifle by using a screw-tipped
      ramrod or some such tool -- a "worm"? -- thereby clearing a minie
      ball-clogged barrel? Maybe I'm thinking on the larger scale of
      artillery, but I believe good ol' yankee [and rebel] ingenuity could
      solve the multi-load problem.

      Art B.
    • hank9174
      After a battle the collected small arms were refurbished and reused. In camp, a soldier was expected to draw a charge on a jammed or otherwise loaded weapon.
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 3, 2004
        After a battle the collected small arms were refurbished and reused.

        In camp, a soldier was expected to draw a charge on a jammed or
        otherwise loaded weapon.

        On the battlefield it was much easier to discard the weapon and find
        one in proper condition...


        HankC

        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Art Bagley" <abagley@u...>
        wrote:
        > Greetings All...
        >
        > Wasn't there a technique called "pulling a round," where a soldier
        > could actually unload [unjam] his rifle by using a screw-tipped
        > ramrod or some such tool -- a "worm"? -- thereby clearing a minie
        > ball-clogged barrel? Maybe I'm thinking on the larger scale of
        > artillery, but I believe good ol' yankee [and rebel] ingenuity
        could
        > solve the multi-load problem.
        >
        > Art B.
      • carlw4514
        Precisely, by no means was a mistakenly overloaded musket unmanageable given some time... but in combat, there couldn t possibly be time to go through the
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 5, 2004
          Precisely, by no means was a mistakenly overloaded musket unmanageable
          given some time... but in combat, there couldn't possibly be time to
          go through the procecure

          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "hank9174" <clarkc@m...> wrote:

          >
          > On the battlefield it was much easier to discard the weapon and find
          > one in proper condition...
          >
          >
          > HankC
          >
        • jblake47
          ... unmanageable ... It could be the fact that many of the weapons became overloaded by use of two different soldiers on the field. If one s gun became
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 6, 2004
            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "carlw4514" <carlw4514@y...>
            wrote:
            > Precisely, by no means was a mistakenly overloaded musket
            unmanageable
            > given some time... but in combat, there couldn't possibly be time to
            > go through the procecure
            >

            It could be the fact that many of the weapons became overloaded by
            use of two different soldiers on the field. If one's gun became
            clogged due to blackpowder residue, drop it and pick another one up.
            At that point, one does not know if the gun is loaded or not. One
            could pull the rammer and test it, or they could load another round
            and if it didn't go all the way in, drop it and find another. Now
            you have a discarded weapon with two rounds it in and it was no
            mistake on anyone's part.

            I would think it would not behoove anyone to run around trying to
            find an empty gun with a rammer. Just pick it up, load it and if it
            loads great, if not, try another. There were plenty to be had.

            Jeff



            > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "hank9174" <clarkc@m...> wrote:
            >
            > >
            > > On the battlefield it was much easier to discard the weapon and
            find
            > > one in proper condition...
            > >
            > >
            > > HankC
            > >
          • carlw4514
            ... Having a muzzleloader myself, I would say that there would be several ways in which a gun could get overloaded: -the above could happen, as the second
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 7, 2004
              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "jblake47" <jblake47@y...> wrote:

              > It could be the fact that many of the weapons became overloaded by
              > use of two different soldiers on the field.

              Having a muzzleloader myself, I would say that there would be several
              ways in which a gun could get overloaded:
              -the above could happen, as the second soldier would be not quite as
              familiar with the weapon's idiosyncracies... one's own musket would be
              harder to misload this way, as for example it is common to make a mark
              on the ramrod to show how far it should go down the barrel when all is
              proper. Different ramrods could even be different lengths.
              -placing a ball before the powder [easy to do if having run out of
              prepared rounds and having to locate separate powder and ball] and
              then loading another round mistakingly assuming the gun actually
              fired, what with all the noise. Examining the ramrod's extension would
              still detect the error, but not so easily.
              -the endangerment scenario: failing to put a cap or not realizing it
              was a faulty cap, overloading, putting a proper cap on and rupturing
              the barrell when firing, with injury certain and death possible.
              Again, that noise of battle bit could mask the initial mistake. A real
              Vet might perhaps always try to be certain he felt the recoil.
              -the below, if the ignition of the cap fails to reach the powder due
              to fouling, in the excitement of battle one might make this
              overloading mistake on an otherwise properly loaded weapon, even on a
              familiar one.... no veteran would put "multiple loads" though, IMO,
              which has a comical aspect when one tries to envision a green trooper
              going through this, assuming he is firing all along. Finally, the
              ramrod sticks so far out even a dolt knows he has to find another weapon!!

              > If one's gun became
              > clogged due to blackpowder residue, drop it and pick another one up.
              > At that point, one does not know if the gun is loaded or not. One
              > could pull the rammer and test it, or they could load another round
              > and if it didn't go all the way in, drop it and find another. Now
              > you have a discarded weapon with two rounds it in and it was no
              > mistake on anyone's part.
              >
              > I would think it would not behoove anyone to run around trying to
              > find an empty gun with a rammer. Just pick it up, load it and if it
              > loads great, if not, try another. There were plenty to be had.


              Interesting that we find this a fascinating topic.


              > Jeff

              Carl
            • GnrlJEJohnston@aol.com
              In a message dated 8/7/2004 7:44:46 AM Eastern Standard Time, carlw4514@yahoo.com writes: I would think it would not behoove anyone to run around trying to ...
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 7, 2004
                In a message dated 8/7/2004 7:44:46 AM Eastern Standard Time, carlw4514@... writes:
                I would think it would not behoove anyone to run around trying to
                > find an empty gun with a rammer.  Just pick it up, load it and if it
                > loads great, if not, try another.  There were plenty to be had.


                Interesting that we find this a fascinating topic.


                > Jeff

                Carl
                If you have any questions on CW weaponry, you might contact JGBilby44@... .  He is one of the foremost experts in the country on this topic and his books should be part of everyone's collection.
                 
                JEJ
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