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Re: [civilwarwest] Grant's victory

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  • D. Andrew Burden, Ph.D.
    I would classify Stones River as a draw tactically, but the aftermath (Bragg withdrawing) was a strategic victory for Rosecrans. Tactically, the battle was
    Message 1 of 80 , Feb 2, 2001
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      I would classify Stones River as a draw tactically, but the aftermath
      (Bragg withdrawing) was a strategic victory for Rosecrans. Tactically,
      the battle was very nearly a disaster for the Union, with darkness and
      disorganization in the Confederates (along with failures to properly
      support the CSA's juggernaught attack on the Union right) saving the
      Union army. Much is made of the stands by Sheridan and Hazen (and they
      were impressive), but their efforts would have come to naught had the
      Confederates gained the Nashville Pike in their rear (which they very
      nearly did, coming within sight of it). So I would say that the first
      day was a Confederate victory. The second day saw no large-scale
      fighting, and the third day saw fighting only for a couple of hours in
      the afternoon (where Breckinridge was shredded by Mendenhall's massed
      guns at McFadden's ford). At that point, Bragg decided he needed to get
      away.
      Andy

      Clyde Thompson wrote:
      >
      > Joseph:
      > I thought we won at Murfeesboro or Stones
      > River as we called it.We marched into Murfeesboro,
      > Bragg having pulled out on Jan.4th.
      > Clyde
      >
      >
      > =====
      > Clyde
      >
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    • ParrotheadDan@avenew.com
      ... Steve, I beleive you to be correct.And as I recall, Rosey was next to him when it happened.----Dan
      Message 80 of 80 , Feb 7, 2001
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        --- In civilwarwest@y..., sdwakefield@p... wrote:
        > I believe that Rosey's Chief of Staff at Murfreesboro was Colonel
        > Julius Garesche' a native of Cuba. Sadly he did have his head shot
        > off during December 31, 1862. I believe that Garfield was Garesche's
        > replacement.
        > Regards-
        > Wakefield



        Steve,

        I beleive you to be correct.And as I recall, Rosey was next to
        him when it happened.----Dan
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