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Re: The Battle of Franklin, and how those who live there have ...

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  • William H Keene
    Hank, Steve, and others, I don t know about all that is going on in Franklin, but that article did not strike me the way it did you. I did not see any
    Message 1 of 5 , May 5, 2004
      Hank, Steve, and others,

      I don't know about all that is going on in Franklin, but that article did not strike me the
      way it did you. I did not see any inference that historic preservation and economic vitality
      are at odds; in fact I thought the author's point was the opposite. To me she was saying
      that Franklin is vital becuase of historic preservation -- she wrote of an active historic
      downtown, the restored Factory, beatiful antebellum homes, Hincheyville. In her eyes
      Franklin is alive while Shiloh is not becuase it is frozen in time as a place of reverence.
      That is what I got from the article.

      Yours,

      Will

      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "hank9174" <clarkc@m...> wrote:
      >
      > Here's what I had to say:
      >
      > To the editor:
      >
      > The recent article 'Somber Shiloh, lively Franklin big contrast'
      > makes a poor inference that historic preservation and economic
      > vitality are somehow at odds with one another.
      >
      > Nothing can be farther from the truth.
      >
      > Across the country there are thousands of towns and cities that
      > cherish, nurture and rely upon their heritage to draw people and
      > events into their communities and enhance their economic well-being.
      > Preserved historical sites and structures are open 52 weeks a year
      > and draw interested tourists, and their dollars, all year. I'm not
      > aware of anyone wishing Franklin to be "a Mecca for Civil War
      > pilgrims", but it certainly can be "a sideshow to the big show" as
      > another Tennessean, Sam Watkins, once asserted.
      >
      > The writer's view seems to be limited to what Middle Tennesseans and
      > Southerners can bring to Franklin. What about those whose itineraries
      > may include a stop at Franklin during a Civil War tour? These people
      > eat, sleep and shop as well! Why limit Franklin's outdoor and
      > recreational attractions to "Its Harpeth River and several parks and
      > green spaces...its beautiful antebellum homes and preserved Fair
      > Street and Hincheyville communities"?
      >
      > Towns and communities must strive to use as many resources at their
      > disposal and realize that these choices are not an 'either-or'
      > proposition but an opportunity to be seized and cherished...
      >
      >
      > Cheers,
      > HankC
      >
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