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Re: uses for bayonets

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  • tasimmo
    ... with ... its ... the ... Yes, definitely a morale thing , especially after the advent of rapid-fire weaponry. The French tried to revive the spirit of
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 1, 2004
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Norris Darrall"
      <norrisdarrall@h...> wrote:
      > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, huddleston.r@c... wrote:
      >
      > > Of course that brings back memories of my own basic training some
      > forty years in the past when we had bayonet drill, always ending
      with
      > sticking the bayoneted rifle into the carcus of the enemy (Russian,
      > of course -- this was pre-Vietnam) and then firing the M-1, using
      its
      > recoil to release the rifle from the body.
      >
      > Flash back. "What is the Spirit of the Bayonet?" Immediately
      > followed by the voices of the company in mass "To Kill". Just as
      the
      > ACW, I think it was a psycological thing. Regular Army from 1962-
      > 65. We are showing our age.
      >
      > Norris


      Yes, definitely a "morale thing", especially after the advent of
      rapid-fire weaponry. The French tried to revive the "spirit of the
      bayonet" in the first weeks of the "Great War" in 1914, only to run
      into the interlacng fire of machine guns, suffering 200,000
      casualties in no time at all...at which point they proceeded to use
      their bayonets as digging tools, which is what they had become.

      Tom S.
    • Bill Merritt
      haha...that IS funny. The Civil War bayonet was designed not to come out. The shape was triangular, because doctors at the time didn t know how to fix a
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 1, 2004
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        haha...that IS funny. The Civil War bayonet was designed not to come out. The shape was triangular, because doctors at the time didn't know how to fix a triangular wound, and the sides of the blade were a little concave, so that when you DID pull it out, it created a suction, pulling out any internal organs that it had stuck. That suction made it hard to pull...and, most likely, you DIDN'T have a round in the rifle, since it was a single-shot rifle, and YOU were stuck.

        huddleston.r@... wrote:
        There is a classic WW II Mauldin cartoon showing Willie and Joe looking at a bayonet and one says to the other, "Did you know this can opener fits on the end of my rifle?"

        Of course that brings back memories of my own basic training some forty years in the past when we had bayonet drill, always ending with sticking the bayoneted rifle into the carcus of the enemy (Russian, of course -- this was pre-Vietnam) and then firing the M-1, using its recoil to release the rifle from the body.

        I had been a private long enough to know that drill sergeants did not reward those who questioned. So I never asked why on earth would I allow an enemy to get close enough to me to need my bayonet when I still had rounds in the chamber of my rifle.

        --
        Take care,

        Bob

        Judy and Bob Huddleston
        10643 Sperry Street
        Northglenn, CO  80234-3612
        huddleston.r@...

        "Nevertheless, the Bayonet was an essential piece of equipment for the Civil War soldier. They served numerous purposes...for instance, they made superb candle-holders, and were very good for cooking meat. I imagine, also, that far more pigs and cows were stuck by bayonets than were humans."

      • GnrlJEJohnston@aol.com
        In a message dated 3/1/2004 1:31:47 PM Eastern Standard Time, huddleston.r@comcast.net writes: There is a classic WW II Mauldin cartoon showing Willie and Joe
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 1, 2004
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          In a message dated 3/1/2004 1:31:47 PM Eastern Standard Time, huddleston.r@... writes:
          There is a classic WW II Mauldin cartoon showing Willie and Joe looking at a bayonet and one says to the other, "Did you know this can opener fits on the end of my rifle?"
          Bob,
          Bill Mauldin died a short time ago and was honored by one of the programs similiar to the Oscar showing.  What they neglected to say however, Mauldin did play in a Civil War movie - -  The Red Badge of Courage.  In the movie, he was Audie Murphy's best friend that always puffed on a corn cob pipe.
           
          The "Brass" did not care for Mauldin for he told the "Ground-pounders" story which was always a lot truer than what the Brass depicted conditions to be.
           
          JEJ
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