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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Colonel Murray [was Confederate Options in 1864 [was H...

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  • LWhite64@aol.com
    John Edward Murray was a wonder kid of sorts, he had attended West Point for eighteen months and resigned to go south, he was 19 in 1861 and a native of Pine
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2004
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      John Edward Murray was a wonder kid of sorts, he had attended West Point for eighteen months and resigned to go south, he was 19 in 1861 and a native of Pine Bluff, Arkansas.  He was Liet.Col of the 5th Arkansas of Liddell's/Govan's Brigade and served in that role from Shiloh through Chickamauga, he was then promoted to Colonel and served in that role to his death in the Battle of Atlanta.

      Lee
    • tasimmo
      ... Point for ... native of ... Liddell s/Govan s ... was then ... Battle of ... Lee, Yes, that s the man. In my opinion, young leaders like John Murray, John
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 1, 2004
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        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, LWhite64@a... wrote:
        > John Edward Murray was a wonder kid of sorts, he had attended West
        Point for
        > eighteen months and resigned to go south, he was 19 in 1861 and a
        native of
        > Pine Bluff, Arkansas. He was Liet.Col of the 5th Arkansas of
        Liddell's/Govan's
        > Brigade and served in that role from Shiloh through Chickamauga, he
        was then
        > promoted to Colonel and served in that role to his death in the
        Battle of
        > Atlanta.
        >
        > Lee

        Lee,

        Yes, that's the man. In my opinion, young leaders like John Murray,
        John C. Carter, and John Kelly were "western counterparts" to the
        likes of John Pelham, Micah Jenkins and Stephen Ramseur in Lee's Army
        of Northern Virginia. It would be a fascinating dicussion to bring
        them into this forum; my point would be that it was not so much
        the personnel makeup of the AOT as compared to the ANV that caused
        the large differences in the success rates of the South's two main
        armies, but other factors. This would, in turn, serve to refute the
        claims of those who would point to some kind of "deficiency" in the
        AOT itself as the reason for its lack of success under John Bell
        Hood, for example, or even when serving under Bragg's leadership.

        Tom S.
      • LWhite64@aol.com
        Tom, Oh the Colonels and Brigadiers of the AOT were a fascinating and some of them had some real talent. You mention both John Murray and John Kelly, I have
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 1, 2004
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          Tom,
                 Oh the Colonels and Brigadiers of the AOT were a fascinating and some of them had some real talent.  You mention both John Murray and John Kelly, I have studied them a good bit as they were both in Liddell's/Govan's brigade which has been a point of study for me for the past ten years.  Both of them were young, both at West Point when the war broke out, both commanded Arkansas Regiments in the same brigade, and both would die in combat.  Kelly would get promoted and did a fantastic and largely unrecognized delaying action at the Battle of Pickett's Mill. 
                   There are others worthy of mention too, Colonel/General Thomas Benton Smith, another Boy General, and then you have some like Colonel Antony Francois Rudler, he served in the Mexican War, was a Filibuster in Cuba and in Nicaragua, he did good service in the AOT, until severly wounded at Missionary Ridge.

          Lee
        • tasimmo
          ... and some ... John Kelly, I ... brigade ... Both of them ... commanded Arkansas ... would get ... action at the ... Thomas ... Colonel Antony ... Cuba and
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 1, 2004
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            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, LWhite64@a... wrote:
            > Tom,
            > Oh the Colonels and Brigadiers of the AOT were a fascinating
            and some
            > of them had some real talent. You mention both John Murray and
            John Kelly, I
            > have studied them a good bit as they were both in Liddell's/Govan's
            brigade
            > which has been a point of study for me for the past ten years.
            Both of them
            > were young, both at West Point when the war broke out, both
            commanded Arkansas
            > Regiments in the same brigade, and both would die in combat. Kelly
            would get
            > promoted and did a fantastic and largely unrecognized delaying
            action at the
            > Battle of Pickett's Mill.
            > There are others worthy of mention too, Colonel/General
            Thomas
            > Benton Smith, another Boy General, and then you have some like
            Colonel Antony
            > Francois Rudler, he served in the Mexican War, was a Filibuster in
            Cuba and in
            > Nicaragua, he did good service in the AOT, until severly wounded at
            Missionary
            > Ridge.
            >
            > Lee


            Lee,

            Very interesting stuff; yes, there were seemingly many "bright
            blades" coming out of the "Cleburne connection" (and elsewhere). My
            overall point with this line of reasoning is that the AOT was NOT
            the rabble Hood represented them to be to Jefferson Davis.

            I didn't know this about Murray, but apparently his commission as a
            brigadier general was approved on the day he died (?).

            BTW, I would like to exchange a private e-mail with you. I'm at
            cedarrun@...

            Regards,

            Tom S.
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