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[civilwarwest] Re: The Blockade

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  • Dave Gorski
    ... Deep water ports weren t necessarily required. Confederate blockade runners Owl, Bat, Deer, and Stag all drew less than 8 feet of water fully
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 5, 2004
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      >it had the same sort of port facilities, but it appears to have had
      >some form of deep water port.

      Deep water ports weren't necessarily required. Confederate
      blockade runners "Owl," "Bat," "Deer," and "Stag" all drew less
      than 8 feet of water fully loaded.
      "Confederate Navy," by Philip Van Doren Stern, page 227

      "The Encyclopedia of the Confederacy," by Richard Current,
      notes that shallow draft vessels were regularly used with
      great success. "Even in the last year of the war, half of the
      blockade runners were getting through."

      Among the more successful runners were;
      "Annie" making 13 runs into Wilmington before her capture
      on 11-1-64.
      "Banshee" making 14 runs into Wilmington before her capture
      on 4-27-63.
      "Denbigh" making 26 runs into Mobile and Galveston before her
      destruction on 5-23-65
      "Herald" making 24 runs into Charleston and Wilmington before
      being lost on 12-19-63.
      "Kate" making 20 runs into Charleston and Wilmington before
      her loss on 11-18-62.
      "Syren" making 33 runs into Wilmington and Charleston before
      her capture on 2-18-65.

      The "Encyclopedia of the American Civil War," by Heidler and Heidler,
      - page 243, "The South's major blockade running ports were the
      Atlantic ports of Wilmington and Charleston, and the Gulf of Mexico
      ports of Mobile and Galveston...Some blockade runners used
      St. Mark's, Florida, and other minor ports."
      "During the war 300 steamers attempted to run the blockade.
      Of these, 136 were captured and 85 were destroyed. Altogether,
      about 1,000 of 1,300 attempted runs were successful."

      IMO, the biggest setback to what at first glance seems to be a
      pretty successful record of blockade running, is what most blockade
      runners brought into the Confederacy. It was not until late in the war,
      too late, that the Confederate government began using its own blockade
      runners. Prior to that all were private operations, with a sole purpose of
      profit. It was not the most needed items that brought the most profit
      so they controlled what came into the Confederacy according to the
      profit the runners could make, rather than by needs. Luxury goods
      became almost plentiful.
      Late in the war, the Confederate government began to regulate the
      runners, demanding that all vessels reserve half of their cargo space for
      government shipments at a set rate. Very late in the war the Confederate
      government purchased its own blockade running vessels, as did the states
      of Georgia and North Carolina.
      Had the blockade runners brought more necessities to the Confederacy
      rather than higher profit goods, the blockade would have been far
      less successful. In some respects, the greed of the blockade runners
      is what made the blockade successful, more than the blockade itself, IMO.

      Regards, Dave Gorski
    • Robert (Bob) Taubman
      In Armageddon s Shadow, The Civil War and Canada s Maritime Provinces , by Greg Marquis, of St. Mary s University in Halifax, is a good source of information
      Message 36 of 36 , Feb 9, 2004
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        "In Armageddon's Shadow, The Civil War and Canada's Maritime Provinces", by
        Greg Marquis, of St. Mary's University in Halifax, is a good source of
        information on blockade running. (ISBN 0-7735-1792-8)

        Bob Taubman
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Dave Gorski" <bigg@...>
        To: <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, February 07, 2004 10:18 AM
        Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: The Blockade


        >
        > > Do you know if there is any record showing if any of the blockade
        > > runners were actually owned by "Northern" principals?
        >
        > J. J. Chaffey out of New Brunswick, Canada was involved.
        >
        > The British firms "Anglo-Confederate Trading Company" and
        > "Collie and Company," ran the blockade on a regular basis.
        > There were also British citizens who had ships that ran the
        > blockade for adventure and profit, including; Joannea Wyllie,
        > Johnathan Steele, Augustus Charles Hobart Hampden, and
        > an Irishman, William Ryan.
        >
        > I am not aware of any specific "Northern" (U. S,) principal
        > but I would be very surprised if there were none. The money
        > was just too good.
        >
        > Regards, Dave Gorski
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
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        >
        >
        >
        >
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