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Re: The Blockade

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  • slippymississippi
    ... ... One alternative I forgot about: the Pearl River system was navigable by riverboat to Jackson, so cargo potentially could have been
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 5, 2004
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "slippymississippi"
      <slippymississippi@y...> wrote:
      > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, John Beatty
      <jdbeatty.geo@y...>
      > wrote:
      > > >The barrier islands off the coast of Mississippi had
      > > deep water access, as did the Pascagoula River. The
      > > Pascagoula River was navigable by barge to within
      > > reasonable distance of Meridian and Mobile, IIRC.
      > >
      > > They did, yes, but without rail communications they
      > > had limited value as supply points.
      >
      > Sure, but Meridian and Mobile both had rail connections. The
      > Escatawpa River in the Pascagoula basin is easily navigable
      > to within 15 miles of Mobile. The Chickasawhay River appears
      > to be navigable by barge to within 20 miles of Meridian.
      > In addition, light draft vessels could ferry cargo from the
      > barrier islands to New Orleans via Lake Ponchartrain. The
      > occupation of the fort at Ship Island and subsequent blockade
      > of the area appear to have put a stop to this sort of traffic:
      > the system of lighthouses up the Pascagoula River ceased to
      > operate afterward.

      One alternative I forgot about: the Pearl River system was navigable
      by riverboat to Jackson, so cargo potentially could have been
      offloaded at the barrier islands and taken by riverboat to the rail
      terminus there.
    • Robert (Bob) Taubman
      In Armageddon s Shadow, The Civil War and Canada s Maritime Provinces , by Greg Marquis, of St. Mary s University in Halifax, is a good source of information
      Message 36 of 36 , Feb 9, 2004
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        "In Armageddon's Shadow, The Civil War and Canada's Maritime Provinces", by
        Greg Marquis, of St. Mary's University in Halifax, is a good source of
        information on blockade running. (ISBN 0-7735-1792-8)

        Bob Taubman
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Dave Gorski" <bigg@...>
        To: <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, February 07, 2004 10:18 AM
        Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: The Blockade


        >
        > > Do you know if there is any record showing if any of the blockade
        > > runners were actually owned by "Northern" principals?
        >
        > J. J. Chaffey out of New Brunswick, Canada was involved.
        >
        > The British firms "Anglo-Confederate Trading Company" and
        > "Collie and Company," ran the blockade on a regular basis.
        > There were also British citizens who had ships that ran the
        > blockade for adventure and profit, including; Joannea Wyllie,
        > Johnathan Steele, Augustus Charles Hobart Hampden, and
        > an Irishman, William Ryan.
        >
        > I am not aware of any specific "Northern" (U. S,) principal
        > but I would be very surprised if there were none. The money
        > was just too good.
        >
        > Regards, Dave Gorski
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
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        >
        >
        >
        >
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