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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: The Blockade

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  • John Beatty
    That s about the size of it, yes. Of the literally hundresd of ports, only those served by rail had any major value, and the Confederacy laid very little new
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 4, 2004
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      That's about the size of it, yes. Of the literally
      hundresd of ports, only those served by rail had any
      major value, and the Confederacy laid very little new
      track during the war.

      --- William H Keene <wh_keene@...> wrote:
      > My thoguhts on the subject:
      >
      > - Initially there were ports in Virginia that needed
      > closing such as
      > Norfolk and Richmond. The capture of Norfolk and
      > the blockade of the
      > James River and Chesepeake Bay closed Virginia.
      >
      > - North Carolina included more ports than just
      > Wilmington becuase of
      > the various ports in Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds
      > (ie: New Berne,
      > Plymouth, Washington). Even with the capture of Ft
      > Hatteras and the
      > Burnside expedition the navy had to cover that area.
      >
      > - In addition to Charleston, the South Carolina
      > coast features minor
      > ports such as Georgetown and Coosawatchie. The
      > caputre of Hilton
      > Head and Beaufort controlled the later. I don't
      > know if the former
      > amounted to much at the time.
      >
      > - The main ports on the Georgia coast were Savannah,
      > Darien, and
      > Brunswick.
      >
      > - On the Atlantic side of Florida was Jacksonville
      > while on the Gulf
      > side was Cedar Keys and Pensacola, all three at
      > railheads. I believe
      > the Navy also blockaded Tampa.
      >
      > - Alabama had Mobile.
      >
      > - The Mississippi coast includes Mississippi City
      > and Biloxi, minor
      > ports at the time with no rail connections.
      >
      > - New Orleans was a major port for the confederacy
      > at the start of
      > the war. Brashear City was a secondary port. The
      > capture of both
      > closed them. I think small draft boats could get to
      > Lake Charles.
      >
      > - In Texas there was Sabine City/Port Arthur,
      > Galveston/Houston,
      > Indianola, Corpus Christi, and Brownsville.
      >
      >
      > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "hank9174"
      > <clarkc@m...> wrote:
      > >
      > > The blockade is typically thought of as a ring of
      > iron and wood
      > > choking the foreign commerce of the Confederacy.
      > On further
      > > reflection it appears that their are relatively
      > FEW ports in the
      > CSA
      > > that need to closed.
      > >
      > > None in Virginia, Wilmington in NC, Charleston SC,
      > Savannah GA,
      > > Jacksonville and Pensacola FL, Mobile AL, New
      > Orleans LA and
      > > Galveston TX.
      > >
      > > There are numerous inlets and bays along the coast
      > for temporary
      > > hiding spots but not for loading and unloading and
      > my list seems
      > > rather short. Are there other major points of
      > entry that the USA
      > was
      > > concerned with?
      > >
      > >
      > > HankC
      >
      >


      =====
      _________________________________
      John D. Beatty, Milwaukee Wisconsin
      AMCIVWAR.COM/AMCIVWAR.NET
      "History is the only test for the consequences of ideas"

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    • Robert (Bob) Taubman
      In Armageddon s Shadow, The Civil War and Canada s Maritime Provinces , by Greg Marquis, of St. Mary s University in Halifax, is a good source of information
      Message 36 of 36 , Feb 9, 2004
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        "In Armageddon's Shadow, The Civil War and Canada's Maritime Provinces", by
        Greg Marquis, of St. Mary's University in Halifax, is a good source of
        information on blockade running. (ISBN 0-7735-1792-8)

        Bob Taubman
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Dave Gorski" <bigg@...>
        To: <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, February 07, 2004 10:18 AM
        Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: The Blockade


        >
        > > Do you know if there is any record showing if any of the blockade
        > > runners were actually owned by "Northern" principals?
        >
        > J. J. Chaffey out of New Brunswick, Canada was involved.
        >
        > The British firms "Anglo-Confederate Trading Company" and
        > "Collie and Company," ran the blockade on a regular basis.
        > There were also British citizens who had ships that ran the
        > blockade for adventure and profit, including; Joannea Wyllie,
        > Johnathan Steele, Augustus Charles Hobart Hampden, and
        > an Irishman, William Ryan.
        >
        > I am not aware of any specific "Northern" (U. S,) principal
        > but I would be very surprised if there were none. The money
        > was just too good.
        >
        > Regards, Dave Gorski
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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