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Re: Missouri, pro-Union or pro-Seccession [was Missouri Regiments

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  • slippymississippi
    ... example. ... contradictory. ... of ... could ... Sorry to reply to my own post, but I just remembered that the Staunton Declaration by Western Virginians
    Message 1 of 38 , Jan 27, 2004
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "slippymississippi"
      <slippymississippi@y...> wrote:
      > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "carlw4514" <carlw4514@y...>
      > wrote:
      > > > The convention delegates reconvened with a quorum and Lyon's
      > support and voted to disband the state legislature and governor's
      > > offices and took over.
      > > >
      > > > My original surprise was that a state said to be 3/4 pro-union
      > (Battle Cry, pg 293) had a pro confederate state legislature.
      > > >
      > > > Now, the explanation could be in the details. Much of the pro
      > unionists in Mo were Germans. Perhaps they did not participate in
      > > state government like the transplanted Virginians did, for
      example.
      > > >
      > > > Ron
      > > -I think one has to admit these two assertions seem
      contradictory.
      >
      > Not at all. From what I know of politics in Mississippi, it took a
      > *lot* of personal money to run for state office, tens of thousands
      of
      > circa 1860's era dollars (which would translate to millions today)
      > out of the candidates' own pockets. What this did in the south was
      > limit political office almost exclusively to the planter class.
      > Mississippi had a strong Unionist underground, but no Unionist
      > representation in the legislature after about 1850.
      >
      > I don't see any natural contradiction in the idea that Missouri
      could
      > have a pro-secession quorum in the legislature and a 3/4 pro-union
      > majority in the population. I wouldn't be surprised if the Texas,
      > Tennessee, and Arkansas numbers were similar.

      Sorry to reply to my own post, but I just remembered that the
      Staunton Declaration by Western Virginians asserted that 10% of the
      white population of Virginia controlled about 75% of the state
      government. The disparity was so great that 30 years prior to the
      Civil War Western Virginians were calling for revolution against
      Virginia:

      "Let the people on this side of the Ridge refuse to support a
      government which deserves their execration, and if they think proper
      to force us into subjection, the presumption is we can 'stand to our
      arms.' Such warfare would be like that of '75. Indeed, the tea has
      already been thrown overboard."

      (Sentinel of the Valley, 1826)
    • slippymississippi
      ... example. ... contradictory. ... of ... could ... Sorry to reply to my own post, but I just remembered that the Staunton Declaration by Western Virginians
      Message 38 of 38 , Jan 27, 2004
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        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "slippymississippi"
        <slippymississippi@y...> wrote:
        > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "carlw4514" <carlw4514@y...>
        > wrote:
        > > > The convention delegates reconvened with a quorum and Lyon's
        > support and voted to disband the state legislature and governor's
        > > offices and took over.
        > > >
        > > > My original surprise was that a state said to be 3/4 pro-union
        > (Battle Cry, pg 293) had a pro confederate state legislature.
        > > >
        > > > Now, the explanation could be in the details. Much of the pro
        > unionists in Mo were Germans. Perhaps they did not participate in
        > > state government like the transplanted Virginians did, for
        example.
        > > >
        > > > Ron
        > > -I think one has to admit these two assertions seem
        contradictory.
        >
        > Not at all. From what I know of politics in Mississippi, it took a
        > *lot* of personal money to run for state office, tens of thousands
        of
        > circa 1860's era dollars (which would translate to millions today)
        > out of the candidates' own pockets. What this did in the south was
        > limit political office almost exclusively to the planter class.
        > Mississippi had a strong Unionist underground, but no Unionist
        > representation in the legislature after about 1850.
        >
        > I don't see any natural contradiction in the idea that Missouri
        could
        > have a pro-secession quorum in the legislature and a 3/4 pro-union
        > majority in the population. I wouldn't be surprised if the Texas,
        > Tennessee, and Arkansas numbers were similar.

        Sorry to reply to my own post, but I just remembered that the
        Staunton Declaration by Western Virginians asserted that 10% of the
        white population of Virginia controlled about 75% of the state
        government. The disparity was so great that 30 years prior to the
        Civil War Western Virginians were calling for revolution against
        Virginia:

        "Let the people on this side of the Ridge refuse to support a
        government which deserves their execration, and if they think proper
        to force us into subjection, the presumption is we can 'stand to our
        arms.' Such warfare would be like that of '75. Indeed, the tea has
        already been thrown overboard."

        (Sentinel of the Valley, 1826)
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