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Beauregard and Bragg...

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  • Lt. Col. James L. Choron
    Carol, What part of Texas are you moving back to? I m from Center, a little town in East Texas, just over the river from Louisaina on Hwy. 7. I haven t been
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 2, 2004
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      Carol,
       
      What part of Texas are you moving back to? I'm from Center, a little town in East Texas, just over the river from Louisaina on Hwy. 7. I haven't been home in about seven years, myself, but I hope to make it in later in the year, around July or August, if I'm lucky.
       
      You're right ASJ died so early in the war, it's hard to really assess him as a general. Bragg, on the other hand, lived about forty years too long. I am reminded of the comment that P.G.T. Beauregard made about him...
       
      Beauregard attended Sherman's funeral. Of course, he had surrendered to Sherman, in '65...
       
      In any case, after the funeral, a Harper's Weekly reporter asked the old General if there he had any "regrets or hard feelings" with regard to the "late war". Beauregard replied... "Only one. Billy (gesturing to the fresh grave, behind him) lied to me". The reporter asked "how so, General"? Beauregard then replied... "Well, when I surrendered, Billy promised me, faithfully that they were going to hang the b***ard that made Braxton Bragg a general".
       
      Now, you take into account that Sherman admired Bragg... and you just have to wonder why?
       
      Also, I think part of Beauregard's problem was that there was a lot of "bad blood" between him and Jefferson Davis, and it went back well before the War, to the time when Davis was Secretary of War... maybe as far as the Mexican War. If Davis said "white", Beuregard would say "black" simply from reflex, and vise-versa. Davis would not use Beauregard to his potential for the same reason.
       
      Beauregard was a very innovative man, for his time, and Davis was extremely "staid" (that's rather like saying "slightly pregnant" or "marginally dead"...)  in his approach to practically everything. Beauregard was a partner in the LeMatt pistol venture, and was one of the big supporters of the C.S.S. Hunley submarine project.
       
      Bragg is outstanding among general officers in the number of his fellow officers who wanted to either see him dead, or to help him along. I believe that Bedford Forest (no paragon of virtue, himself) offered to kill Brag, once, as did at least one other Confederate general (whose name I forget at the moment).
       
      I have alwasys thought it hillariously funny that Al Capp used him as the model for Jubulation T. Cornpone, in the Lil Abner comic strip, and for years, kept an interview with Capp in which he explained this. I still have the interview, somewhere, and as soon as I can find and scan it, I'll post it.
       
      Did you know that two of the very first Confederate generals to have United States Army Posts named after them were Braxton Bragg (Fort Bragg) and John Bell Hood (Fort Hood)?
       
      Considering Bragg's record, it honestly surprises me that he wasn't given a Congressional Medal of Honor for his contribution to the Union War Effort.
       
      An interesting note, here, is that Hood and his entire family died in a Yellow Fever epidemic (maybe Typhoid... I don't remember... both hit about the same time...). In any case, they were destitute. It was P.G.T. Beauregard who mobilized the surviving Civil War generals, from both sides to subscribe to pay off Hood's debts and pay for the funeral expenses of Hood and his family. To a man, they all contributed, including U.S. Grant.
       
      Beauregard was offered command of the Egyptian Army, and the Bulgarian Army after the war, and turned both down. He served in a number of government positions in Louisiana, including head of the State Lottery Commission. He was universally recognized for his (unsuccessful) attempt to end corruption in the lottery.
       
      Jim
    • LWhite64@aol.com
      It should also be noted that Bragg also disliked Davis prior to the war, the main reason that Bragg resigned from the old Army, even after being offered a
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 2, 2004
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        It should also be noted that Bragg also disliked Davis prior to the war, the main reason that Bragg resigned from the old Army, even after being offered a promotion to Major, was because of Jeff Davis.  Also it is interesting that Davis was so stagnent of a person by the time of the Civil War because he was actually pretty innovative during his term as Secretary of War, something changed along the way.  As to the Forrest-Bragg incident, there is a lot of doubt if it had ever occured, times just dont add up, one witness, and if it had happened Forrest would have been court martialed.  Lastly, Bragg wasnt as unpopular as the common view would have you think, Im helping Dave Powell with an article on that right now...I would say that Pemberton was a lot more unpopular than Bragg.

        Lee
      • LWhite64@aol.com
        It should also be noted that Bragg also disliked Davis prior to the war, the main reason that Bragg resigned from the old Army, even after being offered a
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 2, 2004
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          It should also be noted that Bragg also disliked Davis prior to the war, the main reason that Bragg resigned from the old Army, even after being offered a promotion to Major, was because of Jeff Davis.  Also it is interesting that Davis was so stagnent of a person by the time of the Civil War because he was actually pretty innovative during his term as Secretary of War, something changed along the way.  As to the Forrest-Bragg incident, there is a lot of doubt if it had ever occured, times just dont add up, one witness, and if it had happened Forrest would have been court martialed.  Lastly, Bragg wasnt as unpopular as the common view would have you think, Im helping Dave Powell with an article on that right now...I would say that Pemberton was a lot more unpopular than Bragg.

          Lee
        • carole d hanson
          Jim, I m from Nacogdoches, not too far up Rte 7 from Center. I m going to be moving to Trinity, down on Lake Livingston, between Huntsville and Livingston.
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 2, 2004
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            Jim, I'm from Nacogdoches, not too far up Rte 7 from Center. I'm going to be moving to Trinity, down on Lake Livingston, between Huntsville and Livingston. Carole
             
            On Fri, 2 Jan 2004 14:57:58 +0600 "Lt. Col. James L. Choron" <nkitav@...> writes:
            Carol,
             
            What part of Texas are you moving back to? I'm from Center, a little town in East Texas, just over the river from Louisaina on Hwy. 7. I haven't been home in about seven years, myself, but I hope to make it in later in the year, around July or August, if I'm lucky.
             
            You're right ASJ died so early in the war, it's hard to really assess him as a general. Bragg, on the other hand, lived about forty years too long. I am reminded of the comment that P.G.T. Beauregard made about him...
             
            Beauregard attended Sherman's funeral. Of course, he had surrendered to Sherman, in '65...
             
            In any case, after the funeral, a Harper's Weekly reporter asked the old General if there he had any "regrets or hard feelings" with regard to the "late war". Beauregard replied... "Only one. Billy (gesturing to the fresh grave, behind him) lied to me". The reporter asked "how so, General"? Beauregard then replied... "Well, when I surrendered, Billy promised me, faithfully that they were going to hang the b***ard that made Braxton Bragg a general".
             
            Now, you take into account that Sherman admired Bragg... and you just have to wonder why?
             
            Also, I think part of Beauregard's problem was that there was a lot of "bad blood" between him and Jefferson Davis, and it went back well before the War, to the time when Davis was Secretary of War... maybe as far as the Mexican War. If Davis said "white", Beuregard would say "black" simply from reflex, and vise-versa. Davis would not use Beauregard to his potential for the same reason.
             
            Beauregard was a very innovative man, for his time, and Davis was extremely "staid" (that's rather like saying "slightly pregnant" or "marginally dead"...)  in his approach to practically everything. Beauregard was a partner in the LeMatt pistol venture, and was one of the big supporters of the C.S.S. Hunley submarine project.
             
            Bragg is outstanding among general officers in the number of his fellow officers who wanted to either see him dead, or to help him along. I believe that Bedford Forest (no paragon of virtue, himself) offered to kill Brag, once, as did at least one other Confederate general (whose name I forget at the moment).
             
            I have alwasys thought it hillariously funny that Al Capp used him as the model for Jubulation T. Cornpone, in the Lil Abner comic strip, and for years, kept an interview with Capp in which he explained this. I still have the interview, somewhere, and as soon as I can find and scan it, I'll post it.
             
            Did you know that two of the very first Confederate generals to have United States Army Posts named after them were Braxton Bragg (Fort Bragg) and John Bell Hood (Fort Hood)?
             
            Considering Bragg's record, it honestly surprises me that he wasn't given a Congressional Medal of Honor for his contribution to the Union War Effort.
             
            An interesting note, here, is that Hood and his entire family died in a Yellow Fever epidemic (maybe Typhoid... I don't remember... both hit about the same time...). In any case, they were destitute. It was P.G.T. Beauregard who mobilized the surviving Civil War generals, from both sides to subscribe to pay off Hood's debts and pay for the funeral expenses of Hood and his family. To a man, they all contributed, including U.S. Grant.
             
            Beauregard was offered command of the Egyptian Army, and the Bulgarian Army after the war, and turned both down. He served in a number of government positions in Louisiana, including head of the State Lottery Commission. He was universally recognized for his (unsuccessful) attempt to end corruption in the lottery.
             
            Jim


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