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Serving those Generals

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  • George Hall
    I just finished reading an out of print work, some lines of which may show what good leadership brings out of good men. In this case the brigade commander was
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 1, 2004
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      I just finished reading an out of print work, some lines of which
      may show what good leadership brings out of good men. In this case
      the brigade commander was J. B. Turchin.

      [Chickamauga— 36th OVI, Turchin's Brigade, Reynold's Division of
      George Thomas, Army of the Cumberland under William Rosecrans]

      [September 19th] About 4pm we changed front to the right, where
      our lines were being driven back. The retreating troops passed
      through ours, which brought us face to face with an exultant enemy.
      We opened fire, and they took cover behind trees and logs. Our
      position was more exposed in the open, with a perfect line, and our
      losses very much more than the confederates. I hastened to the left
      to report to General Turchin, but could not find him. Colonel W. G.
      Jones, who had lately come to us from the regular army, was mortally
      wounded. Realizing that we must go back or forward, I assumed the
      responsibility and ordered the line forward. They responded with
      bayonets fixed and the old-time yell. The enemy was terror stricken,
      and retreated in great haste. We pursued them to their battery,
      which was abandoned, but impossible for us to bring out because of
      the wooded jungle. Just then a hasty messenger came with orders for
      us to return at once. Our losses were very heavy…… All that night,
      after reforming our lines we lay on our arms with little food or
      water, and hearing the groans of many wounded…
      Sunday, the 20th, we were in line at the right and front of the
      Kelly house. In our front was the right of Longstreet's corps. Our
      orders were not to provoke an attack, but the enemy forced the
      fighting. Our front was repeatedly assaulted all day long.
      Immediately on the right of my regiment our troops gave way about 12
      o'clock. On our left the 92nd Ohio stood firm. With many, their
      ammunition was exhausted. We were most fortunate, having during the
      day had fresh issues through the special friendship of captain John
      D. Barker, acting inspector-general on the staff of General Thomas,
      and "aid" during the battle. He is brother of Captain Barker of
      company A….When the right of our regiment became exposed, I turned
      company D, Captain Stanley, to the right and rear. He lost all his
      sergeants and many more. General Reynolds removed his shoulder
      straps, saying we would have to surrender. He did not know that
      General Thomas ---the "Rock of Chickamauga" --- was on his way to
      us. He came along and pointed a way for us to charge our way out,
      which we did (see his official report), capturing two hundred and
      fifty. This ended that awful day. We had wounded and dead over 35
      percent of our regiment.
      ...
      …That charge up Missionary Ridge was the most inspiring scene in
      the history of wars…We went over their works on the crest of the
      ridge as one man. Most of our men were veterans and did little
      firing, using their time and energy getting there. Both sides had
      muzzle loading guns. The slope was so steep they partially overshot
      us, and we reached their works with bayonets fixed and loaded guns.
      Our regiment took quite a number of prisoners and two cannon. We
      lost eighty-three men."
      ...
      From: Biographical Sketch. Bvt. Brig.-Gen. H.F. Devol, 36th
      Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Kansas City, MO, 1903
    • Lt. Col. James L. Choron
      George, If you can find any post-war history of the 36th, I would appreciate having anything you can lay your hands on. I have reason to believe that they were
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 2, 2004
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        George,

        If you can find any post-war history of the 36th, I would appreciate having
        anything you can lay your hands on. I have reason to believe that they were
        reconstituted, at least in part, for the War with Spain. I can't find any
        documentation, but Ohio did have a major presence in that war, and it was
        mostly volunteer infantry.

        Jim


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "George Hall" <preachergeorgewv@...>
        To: <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, January 02, 2004 10:31 AM
        Subject: [civilwarwest] Serving those Generals


        > I just finished reading an out of print work, some lines of which
        > may show what good leadership brings out of good men. In this case
        > the brigade commander was J. B. Turchin.
        >
        > [Chickamauga- 36th OVI, Turchin's Brigade, Reynold's Division of
        > George Thomas, Army of the Cumberland under William Rosecrans]
        >
        > [September 19th] About 4pm we changed front to the right, where
        > our lines were being driven back. The retreating troops passed
        > through ours, which brought us face to face with an exultant enemy.
        > We opened fire, and they took cover behind trees and logs. Our
        > position was more exposed in the open, with a perfect line, and our
        > losses very much more than the confederates. I hastened to the left
        > to report to General Turchin, but could not find him. Colonel W. G.
        > Jones, who had lately come to us from the regular army, was mortally
        > wounded. Realizing that we must go back or forward, I assumed the
        > responsibility and ordered the line forward. They responded with
        > bayonets fixed and the old-time yell. The enemy was terror stricken,
        > and retreated in great haste. We pursued them to their battery,
        > which was abandoned, but impossible for us to bring out because of
        > the wooded jungle. Just then a hasty messenger came with orders for
        > us to return at once. Our losses were very heavy.. All that night,
        > after reforming our lines we lay on our arms with little food or
        > water, and hearing the groans of many wounded.
        > Sunday, the 20th, we were in line at the right and front of the
        > Kelly house. In our front was the right of Longstreet's corps. Our
        > orders were not to provoke an attack, but the enemy forced the
        > fighting. Our front was repeatedly assaulted all day long.
        > Immediately on the right of my regiment our troops gave way about 12
        > o'clock. On our left the 92nd Ohio stood firm. With many, their
        > ammunition was exhausted. We were most fortunate, having during the
        > day had fresh issues through the special friendship of captain John
        > D. Barker, acting inspector-general on the staff of General Thomas,
        > and "aid" during the battle. He is brother of Captain Barker of
        > company A..When the right of our regiment became exposed, I turned
        > company D, Captain Stanley, to the right and rear. He lost all his
        > sergeants and many more. General Reynolds removed his shoulder
        > straps, saying we would have to surrender. He did not know that
        > General Thomas ---the "Rock of Chickamauga" --- was on his way to
        > us. He came along and pointed a way for us to charge our way out,
        > which we did (see his official report), capturing two hundred and
        > fifty. This ended that awful day. We had wounded and dead over 35
        > percent of our regiment.
        > ...
        > .That charge up Missionary Ridge was the most inspiring scene in
        > the history of wars.We went over their works on the crest of the
        > ridge as one man. Most of our men were veterans and did little
        > firing, using their time and energy getting there. Both sides had
        > muzzle loading guns. The slope was so steep they partially overshot
        > us, and we reached their works with bayonets fixed and loaded guns.
        > Our regiment took quite a number of prisoners and two cannon. We
        > lost eighty-three men."
        > ...
        > From: Biographical Sketch. Bvt. Brig.-Gen. H.F. Devol, 36th
        > Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Kansas City, MO, 1903
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        > To visit your group on the web, go to:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/civilwarwest/
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > civilwarwest-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
        > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
      • George Hall
        Hi Col: I just spoke with a friend who is recognized as one of the historians in this area (he even wrote a self-published work on the 63rd Ohio). He says he
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 2, 2004
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          Hi Col:
          I just spoke with a friend who is recognized as one
          of the historians in this area (he even wrote a
          self-published work on the 63rd Ohio). He says he
          simply cannot say whether a call-up of this nature
          involved the 36th OVI. I will say that I remember
          reading in a couple of sources that the 36th remained
          a volunteer militia, at least for several years. It
          seems that in one case there was some recognition of
          them as part of the later ONG (Ohio National Gaurd).
          In such case, they may have been called in the later
          war. Obviously, only younger men would be involved.
          There is a Sons of Union Veterans meeting next week.
          I will attend, along with this friend, and someone
          there should have an answer. Several members know much
          more than I do.
          George



          --- "Lt. Col. James L. Choron" <nkitav@...> wrote:
          > George,
          >
          > If you can find any post-war history of the 36th, I
          > would appreciate having
          > anything you can lay your hands on. I have reason to
          > believe that they were
          > reconstituted, at least in part, for the War with
          > Spain. I can't find any
          > documentation, but Ohio did have a major presence in
          > that war, and it was
          > mostly volunteer infantry.
          >
          > Jim
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "George Hall" <preachergeorgewv@...>
          > To: <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Friday, January 02, 2004 10:31 AM
          > Subject: [civilwarwest] Serving those Generals
          >
          >
          > > I just finished reading an out of print work,
          > some lines of which
          > > may show what good leadership brings out of good
          > men. In this case
          > > the brigade commander was J. B. Turchin.
          > >
          > > [Chickamauga- 36th OVI, Turchin's Brigade,
          > Reynold's Division of
          > > George Thomas, Army of the Cumberland under
          > William Rosecrans]
          > >
          > > [September 19th] About 4pm we changed front to
          > the right, where
          > > our lines were being driven back. The retreating
          > troops passed
          > > through ours, which brought us face to face with
          > an exultant enemy.
          > > We opened fire, and they took cover behind trees
          > and logs. Our
          > > position was more exposed in the open, with a
          > perfect line, and our
          > > losses very much more than the confederates. I
          > hastened to the left
          > > to report to General Turchin, but could not find
          > him. Colonel W. G.
          > > Jones, who had lately come to us from the regular
          > army, was mortally
          > > wounded. Realizing that we must go back or
          > forward, I assumed the
          > > responsibility and ordered the line forward. They
          > responded with
          > > bayonets fixed and the old-time yell. The enemy
          > was terror stricken,
          > > and retreated in great haste. We pursued them to
          > their battery,
          > > which was abandoned, but impossible for us to
          > bring out because of
          > > the wooded jungle. Just then a hasty messenger
          > came with orders for
          > > us to return at once. Our losses were very heavy..
          > All that night,
          > > after reforming our lines we lay on our arms with
          > little food or
          > > water, and hearing the groans of many wounded.
          > > Sunday, the 20th, we were in line at the right
          > and front of the
          > > Kelly house. In our front was the right of
          > Longstreet's corps. Our
          > > orders were not to provoke an attack, but the
          > enemy forced the
          > > fighting. Our front was repeatedly assaulted all
          > day long.
          > > Immediately on the right of my regiment our troops
          > gave way about 12
          > > o'clock. On our left the 92nd Ohio stood firm.
          > With many, their
          > > ammunition was exhausted. We were most fortunate,
          > having during the
          > > day had fresh issues through the special
          > friendship of captain John
          > > D. Barker, acting inspector-general on the staff
          > of General Thomas,
          > > and "aid" during the battle. He is brother of
          > Captain Barker of
          > > company A..When the right of our regiment became
          > exposed, I turned
          > > company D, Captain Stanley, to the right and rear.
          > He lost all his
          > > sergeants and many more. General Reynolds removed
          > his shoulder
          > > straps, saying we would have to surrender. He did
          > not know that
          > > General Thomas ---the "Rock of Chickamauga" ---
          > was on his way to
          > > us. He came along and pointed a way for us to
          > charge our way out,
          > > which we did (see his official report), capturing
          > two hundred and
          > > fifty. This ended that awful day. We had wounded
          > and dead over 35
          > > percent of our regiment.
          > > ...
          > > .That charge up Missionary Ridge was the most
          > inspiring scene in
          > > the history of wars.We went over their works on
          > the crest of the
          > > ridge as one man. Most of our men were veterans
          > and did little
          > > firing, using their time and energy getting there.
          > Both sides had
          > > muzzle loading guns. The slope was so steep they
          > partially overshot
          > > us, and we reached their works with bayonets fixed
          > and loaded guns.
          > > Our regiment took quite a number of prisoners and
          > two cannon. We
          > > lost eighty-three men."
          > > ...
          > > From: Biographical Sketch. Bvt. Brig.-Gen.
          > H.F. Devol, 36th
          > > Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Kansas City, MO, 1903
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/civilwarwest/
          > >
          > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > > civilwarwest-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > >
          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
          > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          > >
          >
          >


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        • Lt. Col. James L. Choron
          George, Thank you SIR! Please do ask at the meeting. I am really interested in documenting this, and possibly finding some first hand accounts of service. I
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 2, 2004
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            George,

            Thank you SIR! Please do ask at the meeting. I am really interested in
            documenting this, and possibly finding some first hand accounts of service.

            I think you're right about it being the younger men, but there is a high
            probabillity that the officers and senior NCOs included some Civil War vets.

            Jim


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "George Hall" <preachergeorgewv@...>
            To: <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, January 02, 2004 11:35 PM
            Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Serving those Generals


            > Hi Col:
            > I just spoke with a friend who is recognized as one
            > of the historians in this area (he even wrote a
            > self-published work on the 63rd Ohio). He says he
            > simply cannot say whether a call-up of this nature
            > involved the 36th OVI. I will say that I remember
            > reading in a couple of sources that the 36th remained
            > a volunteer militia, at least for several years. It
            > seems that in one case there was some recognition of
            > them as part of the later ONG (Ohio National Gaurd).
            > In such case, they may have been called in the later
            > war. Obviously, only younger men would be involved.
            > There is a Sons of Union Veterans meeting next week.
            > I will attend, along with this friend, and someone
            > there should have an answer. Several members know much
            > more than I do.
            > George
            >
            >
            >
            > --- "Lt. Col. James L. Choron" <nkitav@...> wrote:
            > > George,
            > >
            > > If you can find any post-war history of the 36th, I
            > > would appreciate having
            > > anything you can lay your hands on. I have reason to
            > > believe that they were
            > > reconstituted, at least in part, for the War with
            > > Spain. I can't find any
            > > documentation, but Ohio did have a major presence in
            > > that war, and it was
            > > mostly volunteer infantry.
            > >
            > > Jim
            > >
            > >
            > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > From: "George Hall" <preachergeorgewv@...>
            > > To: <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
            > > Sent: Friday, January 02, 2004 10:31 AM
            > > Subject: [civilwarwest] Serving those Generals
            > >
            > >
            > > > I just finished reading an out of print work,
            > > some lines of which
            > > > may show what good leadership brings out of good
            > > men. In this case
            > > > the brigade commander was J. B. Turchin.
            > > >
            > > > [Chickamauga- 36th OVI, Turchin's Brigade,
            > > Reynold's Division of
            > > > George Thomas, Army of the Cumberland under
            > > William Rosecrans]
            > > >
            > > > [September 19th] About 4pm we changed front to
            > > the right, where
            > > > our lines were being driven back. The retreating
            > > troops passed
            > > > through ours, which brought us face to face with
            > > an exultant enemy.
            > > > We opened fire, and they took cover behind trees
            > > and logs. Our
            > > > position was more exposed in the open, with a
            > > perfect line, and our
            > > > losses very much more than the confederates. I
            > > hastened to the left
            > > > to report to General Turchin, but could not find
            > > him. Colonel W. G.
            > > > Jones, who had lately come to us from the regular
            > > army, was mortally
            > > > wounded. Realizing that we must go back or
            > > forward, I assumed the
            > > > responsibility and ordered the line forward. They
            > > responded with
            > > > bayonets fixed and the old-time yell. The enemy
            > > was terror stricken,
            > > > and retreated in great haste. We pursued them to
            > > their battery,
            > > > which was abandoned, but impossible for us to
            > > bring out because of
            > > > the wooded jungle. Just then a hasty messenger
            > > came with orders for
            > > > us to return at once. Our losses were very heavy..
            > > All that night,
            > > > after reforming our lines we lay on our arms with
            > > little food or
            > > > water, and hearing the groans of many wounded.
            > > > Sunday, the 20th, we were in line at the right
            > > and front of the
            > > > Kelly house. In our front was the right of
            > > Longstreet's corps. Our
            > > > orders were not to provoke an attack, but the
            > > enemy forced the
            > > > fighting. Our front was repeatedly assaulted all
            > > day long.
            > > > Immediately on the right of my regiment our troops
            > > gave way about 12
            > > > o'clock. On our left the 92nd Ohio stood firm.
            > > With many, their
            > > > ammunition was exhausted. We were most fortunate,
            > > having during the
            > > > day had fresh issues through the special
            > > friendship of captain John
            > > > D. Barker, acting inspector-general on the staff
            > > of General Thomas,
            > > > and "aid" during the battle. He is brother of
            > > Captain Barker of
            > > > company A..When the right of our regiment became
            > > exposed, I turned
            > > > company D, Captain Stanley, to the right and rear.
            > > He lost all his
            > > > sergeants and many more. General Reynolds removed
            > > his shoulder
            > > > straps, saying we would have to surrender. He did
            > > not know that
            > > > General Thomas ---the "Rock of Chickamauga" ---
            > > was on his way to
            > > > us. He came along and pointed a way for us to
            > > charge our way out,
            > > > which we did (see his official report), capturing
            > > two hundred and
            > > > fifty. This ended that awful day. We had wounded
            > > and dead over 35
            > > > percent of our regiment.
            > > > ...
            > > > .That charge up Missionary Ridge was the most
            > > inspiring scene in
            > > > the history of wars.We went over their works on
            > > the crest of the
            > > > ridge as one man. Most of our men were veterans
            > > and did little
            > > > firing, using their time and energy getting there.
            > > Both sides had
            > > > muzzle loading guns. The slope was so steep they
            > > partially overshot
            > > > us, and we reached their works with bayonets fixed
            > > and loaded guns.
            > > > Our regiment took quite a number of prisoners and
            > > two cannon. We
            > > > lost eighty-three men."
            > > > ...
            > > > From: Biographical Sketch. Bvt. Brig.-Gen.
            > > H.F. Devol, 36th
            > > > Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Kansas City, MO, 1903
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > > >
            > > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/civilwarwest/
            > > >
            > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > > > civilwarwest-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > > >
            > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
            > > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > __________________________________
            > Do you Yahoo!?
            > New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing.
            > http://photos.yahoo.com/
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            > To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/civilwarwest/
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > civilwarwest-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
          • DORR64OVI@aol.com
            In a message dated 1/2/2004 12:41:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... George...who is the author of the work on the 63rd? Im also a Sons member and know a
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 2, 2004
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              In a message dated 1/2/2004 12:41:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, preachergeorgewv@... writes:

              Hi Col:
                I just spoke with a friend who is recognized as one
              of the historians in this area (he even wrote a
              self-published work on the 63rd Ohio).  He says he
              simply cannot say whether a call-up of this nature
              involved the 36th OVI.  I will say that I remember
              reading in a couple of sources that the 36th remained
              a volunteer militia, at least for several years. It
              seems that in one case there was some recognition of
              them as part of the later ONG (Ohio National Gaurd).
              In such case, they may have been called in the later
              war. Obviously, only younger men would be involved.
              There is a Sons of Union Veterans meeting next week.
              I will attend, along with this friend, and someone
              there should have an answer. Several members know much
              more than I do.
              George


              George...who is the author of the work on the 63rd?  Im also a Sons member and know a brother who has researched the 63rd OVI.  What state are you in?


              Kent Dorr
              Mansfield Ohio
            • George Hall
              Kent: It was James Miracle -- Marietta, Ohio chapter. He is a distant cousin. A shared ancestor was permanently disabled from Missionary Ridge. He may have a
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 2, 2004
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                Kent:
                It was James Miracle -- Marietta, Ohio chapter. He
                is a distant cousin. A shared ancestor was permanently
                disabled from Missionary Ridge. He may have a website,
                I am not sure.
                BTW, brief me on the 64th. Were they largely from
                your own Mansfield area? I assume they went into
                Western theatre, Shiloh, etc. Do YOU know of any Ohio
                activations for the Spanish war?
                George


                --- DORR64OVI@... wrote:
                > In a message dated 1/2/2004 12:41:56 PM Eastern
                > Standard Time,
                > preachergeorgewv@... writes:
                >
                > > Hi Col:
                > > I just spoke with a friend who is recognized as
                > one
                > > of the historians in this area (he even wrote a
                > > self-published work on the 63rd Ohio). He says he
                > > simply cannot say whether a call-up of this nature
                > > involved the 36th OVI. I will say that I remember
                > > reading in a couple of sources that the 36th
                > remained
                > > a volunteer militia, at least for several years.
                > It
                > > seems that in one case there was some recognition
                > of
                > > them as part of the later ONG (Ohio National
                > Gaurd).
                > > In such case, they may have been called in the
                > later
                > > war. Obviously, only younger men would be
                > involved.
                > > There is a Sons of Union Veterans meeting next
                > week.
                > > I will attend, along with this friend, and someone
                > > there should have an answer. Several members know
                > much
                > > more than I do.
                > > George
                >
                > George...who is the author of the work on the 63rd?
                > Im also a Sons member
                > and know a brother who has researched the 63rd OVI.
                > What state are you in?
                >
                >
                > Kent Dorr
                > Mansfield Ohio
                >


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              • DORR64OVI@aol.com
                In a message dated 1/2/2004 5:13:42 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... George, the 64th OVI was a pretty decent fighting regiment serving with the Army of Ohio and
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 3, 2004
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                  In a message dated 1/2/2004 5:13:42 PM Eastern Standard Time, preachergeorgewv@... writes:

                    Kent:
                  It was James Miracle -- Marietta, Ohio chapter. He
                  is a distant cousin. A shared ancestor was permanently
                  disabled from Missionary Ridge. He may have a website,
                  I am not sure.
                    BTW, brief me on the 64th. Were they largely from
                  your own Mansfield area? I assume they went into
                  Western theatre, Shiloh, etc. Do YOU know of any Ohio
                  activations for the Spanish war?
                    George


                  George, the 64th OVI was a pretty decent fighting regiment serving with the Army of Ohio and then the Army of the Cumberland.  Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Tullahoma, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Kennesaw Mt, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, Spring Hill, Franklin, & Nashville
                      The 64th, and its sister regiment the 65th OVI were raised together in Mansfield thru the efforts of Senator John Sherman (Uncle Billys brother) who was a lawyer/businessman in Mansfield at the time.  A strong Lincoln supporter, Sherman bypassed the Ohio authorities and had these two regiments supplied directly from the Federal govt.  The first Colonel of the 65th was Charles G. Harker who went on to ably serve as brigade commander until his death at Kennesaw in June of 1864.
                      These regiments finished the war in Texas and were sent home to Ohio in 1865 where they went out of service.  For the Span-AM war, I know the Mansfield men were in the 8th Ohio.

                  Kent Dorr
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