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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Trivia: last state admitted

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  • carole d hanson
    Speaking as a lawyer (and Heaven knows my profession exists on technicalities), I have to agree with Mr. Keene. After the process in 1802-03, Ohio was
    Message 1 of 36 , Dec 24, 2003
      Speaking as a lawyer (and Heaven knows my profession exists on technicalities), I have to agree with Mr. Keene. After the process in 1802-03, Ohio was recognized as a State, treated as a State, had all the privileges and benefits of a state, including representation in the Congress and producing a President or two (McKinley and Harding come to mind). Legally, all a ceremonial resolution could have done is to ratify any and all actions taken by and toward the State of Ohio, and frankly I doubt that it had that force or was needed. Also, to use "the proof is the in the pudding" argument, if the correct answer on the game show was Ohio in the 1950s, why did the contestant win his lawsuit against the program?  By the way, excluding Alaska and Hawaii, the last states admitted to the Union were Arizona and New Mexico, admitted in 1912. Carole
       
      On Wed, 24 Dec 2003 00:16:18 -0000 "William H Keene" <wh_keene@...> writes:
      In my opinion this is myth.  There was nothing techically or legally
      wrong with the process conducted in 1802-1803.  The only think
      lacking was ceremony, and in 1953 the only thing added was a
      ceremonial resolution. 

      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, GnrlJEJohnston@a... wrote:
      > ...
      > OHIO
      >
      > Now you say, that is impossible, Ohio has been a State since the
      1830's. 
      > Wrong.  If you notice, the question stated "the last State
      technically and
      > legally".   Ohio would have been a technical and legal State of the
      Union since the
      > 1830's, but those Buckeyes (dictionary definition is "A Useless
      Nut") in the
      > State Legislature forgot to ratify their acceptance into the Union
      and it was
      > not until the 1950's was this omission discovered.  Then and only
      then did
      > their legislature ratify their becoming a State within the Union. 
      Thus, it was in
      > the 1950's that Ohio became technically and legally a State of the
      Union.
      >
      > I know, this is a low blow.  Back in the 1950's there was a quiz
      program
      > called the $64,000 Question.  The question was asked early on, what
      was the last
      > State technically and legally admitted to the Union. The contestant
      answered
      > Ohio.  They said he was wrong and the correct answer was New Mexico.
      (1907).   He
      > turned around and sued the sponsors for one million dollars for
      defamation of
      > character and I forget what else, and won his suit.  The two words,
      > technically and legally are the catch within the question.
      >
      > JEJ
      >
      > To all of you and to your families,
      >  MERRY CHRISTMAS -
      > HAPPY NEW YEAR,
      > AND A JOYFUL CHANUKAH




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    • Lt. Col. James L. Choron
      Joe, Like I said, he also serves who only stands and waits . Linclon was at least willing to go to war for his country, and at the time they marched, he had
      Message 36 of 36 , Jan 1, 2004
        Joe,
         
        Like I said, "he also serves who only stands and waits". Linclon was at least willing to go to war for his country, and at the time they marched, he had no idea that the war would be over before he was involved. Certainly, combat experience would have altered his viewpoint on many things, but the fact that he did serve and was willing to fight for his country is an ample demonstration of his courage and character, whether he saw combat or not.
         
        Jim
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, January 01, 2004 6:50 AM
        Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Re: ..... - Presidents

        In a message dated 12/31/2003 3:11:54 AM Eastern Standard Time, nkitav@... writes:
        Linclon served, briefly, in the Blackhawk War, but as far as I can determine
        saw no combat. Still, he wore the uniform, and was willing to do so.

        Jim
        Lincoln was a Captain of a bunch of volunteers.  He and his men marched from Salem, Illinois northward into Wisconsin but got as far as Lake Geneva when they received word that the war was over and their services were not needed.  Degrudgenly, they turned around and marched back to Salem.
         
        JEJ
         
        PS  Ironically, a statue of Blackhawk on the Rock River below Rockford is larger than any statue of a Civil War leader.



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