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Georgia State Flag

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  • David Kent Fonner
    Of course the Confederate Battle Flag stands for more than just rascism. Otherwise it would not have endured as a symbol until thepresent. I have mixed
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 30, 2000
      Of course the Confederate Battle Flag stands for more than just rascism.
      Otherwise it would not have endured as a symbol until thepresent. I have
      mixed feelings. My great-great grandfather died while fighting against that
      flag. Each time I think about his wife spending the rest of her life as a
      widow seamstress at the mercy of relatives and my great grandmother growing up
      without ever knowing her father, I see the Confederate flag as a symbol to be
      reviled. BUT... I also understand the feelings of those who revere it.
      Besides, I believe I have seen stats indicating that some Blacks willingly
      served under that flag. It seems to me that the Georgia flag should not be
      altered without a full and open debate. To simply dismiss the old Confederate
      battle flag as a hated relic of racism tends to oversimplify things.
      Certainly the state should not just bend to the whims of a minority of its
      citizens without a full airing of the subject. It is hard to tell what
      insights might come from a full debate.

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    • Margaret D. Blough
      Message text written by INTERNET:civilwarwest@egroups.com ... Of course the Confederate Battle Flag stands for more than just rascism. Otherwise it would not
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 30, 2000
        Message text written by INTERNET:civilwarwest@egroups.com
        >
        Of course the Confederate Battle Flag stands for more than just rascism.
        Otherwise it would not have endured as a symbol until thepresent. I have
        mixed feelings. My great-great grandfather died while fighting against
        that
        flag. Each time I think about his wife spending the rest of her life as a
        widow seamstress at the mercy of relatives and my great grandmother growing
        up
        without ever knowing her father, I see the Confederate flag as a symbol to
        be
        reviled. BUT... I also understand the feelings of those who revere it.
        Besides, I believe I have seen stats indicating that some Blacks willingly
        served under that flag. It seems to me that the Georgia flag should not be
        altered without a full and open debate. To simply dismiss the old
        Confederate
        battle flag as a hated relic of racism tends to oversimplify things.
        Certainly the state should not just bend to the whims of a minority of its
        citizens without a full airing of the subject. It is hard to tell what
        insights might come from a full debate.
        <

        It isn't simply any one thing, but the same symbol can have different
        meanings to different groups, depending on circumstances. At the time that
        the current Georgia state flag was adopted, black citizens of that state
        were almost totally disenfranchised and had no say in its selection. It
        wasn't just the use of the battle flag by private hate groups. The
        message that was sent when it was adopted was a message of defiance to the
        federal Constitution, government, and courts and a message to the Black
        citizens of that state that the state would engage in Massive Resistance to
        any and all efforts to protect and enforce the rights of Blacks under the
        US Constitution, especially the 14th and 15th Amendments. It would be one
        thing if the battle flag's history had stopped in 1865. One doesn't see
        the emotional reaction to either the First National Flag or the Palmetto
        flag of South Carolina, for instance. Perhaps official recognition of this
        and acknowledgement of the poisonous legacy of the Jim Crow era will
        defuse some of the tension.

        Regards,

        Margaret
      • RednekRampag1@aol.com
        I believe the Georgia flag should remain the same. The Civil War was NOT fought just for slavery, so therefore the Confederate flag should not be seen as a
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 30, 2000
          I believe the Georgia flag should remain the same.  The Civil War was NOT
          fought just for slavery, so therefore the Confederate flag should not be seen
          as a flag of racism, HOWEVER, it has been twisted around by KKK an dracist
          groups, which is wrong.  But the flag is a part of our history not to be
          forgotten.  It is nothing like the Nazi Swastika which was changed to
          something evil during the war, ins tead, it is merely a flag of a rebellion
          long gone, having to do with implements of slavery.  But I do not believe the
          civil war was fought for slavery alone, so therefore I do not see the flag as
          a sign of racism unless used in that way, such as the KKK.  If seen with the
          United States flag, it MUST be put below the U.S. one, proper respect must be
          shown, but it is our history.  In case anyone misreads what I typed here, I
          want to make clear that I am a strong anti-racist, and view it a! s a vile
          belief.
        • Bob Huddleston
          The Georgia Historical Society had a detailed, heavily footnoted, article on the adoption of the present Georgia flag. The article was a couple of years ago.
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 1, 2000
            The Georgia Historical Society had a detailed, heavily footnoted, article on
            the adoption of the present Georgia flag. The article was a couple of years
            ago.
            The gist of the article was that the current flag was modified to reflect
            the sympathies of those who wanted to maintain Jim Crow and continue the
            denial of Civil Rights to Georgia's sscond class Black citizens .

            As for the Cause of the War - well, the Americans of the 1860's, of all
            colors and all geographic regions, had no doubts that the Confederacy was
            created to preserve the Peculiar Institution as the ''cornerstone'' of the
            new country.

            Bob Huddleston

            RednekRampag1@... wrote on 11/30/00 7:16 pm:

            I believe the Georgia flag should remain the same. The Civil War was NOT
            fought just for slavery, so therefore the Confederate flag should not be
            seen as a flag of racism,
            SNIP
          • Bob Huddleston
            The Georgia Historical Society had a detailed, heavily footnoted, article on the adoption of the present Georgia flag. The article was a couple of years ago.
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 1, 2000
              The Georgia Historical Society had a detailed, heavily footnoted, article on
              the adoption of the present Georgia flag. The article was a couple of years
              ago.
              The gist of the article was that the current flag was modified to reflect
              the sympathies of those who wanted to maintain Jim Crow and continue the
              denial of Civil Rights to Georgia's sscond class Black citizens .

              As for the Cause of the War - well, the Americans of the 1860's, of all
              colors and all geographic regions, had no doubts that the Confederacy was
              created to preserve the Peculiar Institution as the ''cornerstone'' of the
              new country.

              Bob Huddleston

              RednekRampag1@... wrote on 11/30/00 7:16 pm:

              I believe the Georgia flag should remain the same. The Civil War was NOT
              fought just for slavery, so therefore the Confederate flag should not be
              seen as a flag of racism,
              SNIP
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