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Letter from a USCT

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  • Bob Huddleston
    When doing research every now and then one stumbles across something so powerful that you are taken aback and just sit and stare at it. This is one of those
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 29, 2000
      When doing research every now and then one stumbles across something so
      powerful that you are taken aback and just sit and stare at it.

      This is one of those times. I was sitting Friday in the Old Army Records
      room at the National Archives. A professor from the University of Detroit
      was being introduced to the Civil War CMSR and Pension records of the United
      States Colored troops from a couple of staffers who have been working
      extensively with the files.

      The letter pasted below is in the file of Private Samuel Cabel (or �Cabelle�
      as he spelled it), Co. G, 55th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry (Colored).
      He enlisted on June 5, 1863 at Readville, MA and was described on the
      company records as being 21 years old, light complexion, �grey� eyes, and
      black hair. Cabel told the Massachusetts people that he was from Keokuk, IA,
      but in reality he was an escaped slave from Brunswick, MO. His occupation
      was given as a waiter.

      On August 29, 1865, Pvt. Cabel was mustered out at Charleston, SC.

      Included in his service file is a letter to his wife back in Missouri. As
      you read it, remember that it was illegal for slaves to learn to read and
      write.

      But not only could Cabel write but obviously his wife could read � and
      write. And Cabel's handwriting is very clear and readable, even if he is a
      little original in his spelling!

      I questioned if someone else might have written the letter for him and the
      NARA staffers informed us that they think the literacy rate among the
      soldiers was a lot higher than has been previously thought. Almost all of
      the men from slave states signed their enlistment papers with an �X� �
      perhaps at that moment their trust level with whites was not very high.

      But, the staff said, very quickly the men are writing letters and signing
      documents. Now that Uncle Sam had actually put them in a blue uniform and
      handed them a Springfield, the rules had changed.

      The letter is undated but must be from June or July 1863.

      It is reproduced as written � and my spell check did not like that one
      little bit!

      Take care,

      Bob

      JUDY AND BOB HUDDLESTON
      10643 Sperry Street
      Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
      303.451.6376 adco@...
      Fax: 303.452.3051

      Dear wife i have enlisted in the army i am now in the state of Massachusetts
      but before this letter reaches you i will be in north carolina and though
      great in the present national difficulties yet i look forward to a brighter
      day when i shall have the opertunity of seeing you in the full enjoyment of
      freedom i would like to no if you are still in slavery if you are it will
      not be long before we shall have crushed the system in that now opreses you
      for in the course of three months you shall be at liberty. great is the
      outpouring of the colored people that is now rallying with the hearts of
      lions against that very curse that has separated you and me yet we shall
      meet again and oh what happy time that will be when this ungodly rebellion
      shall be put down and the curse of our land is trampled under our feet i am
      a soldier endeavry to strike at the rebellion that so long has kept us in
      chains. write to me just as soon as you get this letter tell me if you are
      in the same cabin where you use to live. tell eliza i send her my best
      respects and love ike and sully likewise i would send you some money but i
      now it is impossible for you to get it i would like to see little Jenkins
      now but i no it is impossible at present so no more but remain your own
      afectionate husband until death

      Samuel Cabble
    • Bob Huddleston
      When doing research every now and then one stumbles across something so powerful that you are taken aback and just sit and stare at it. This is one of those
      Message 2 of 14 , Oct 29, 2000
        When doing research every now and then one stumbles across something so
        powerful that you are taken aback and just sit and stare at it.

        This is one of those times. I was sitting Friday in the Old Army Records
        room at the National Archives. A professor from the University of Detroit
        was being introduced to the Civil War CMSR and Pension records of the United
        States Colored troops from a couple of staffers who have been working
        extensively with the files.

        The letter pasted below is in the file of Private Samuel Cabel (or �Cabelle�
        as he spelled it), Co. G, 55th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry (Colored).
        He enlisted on June 5, 1863 at Readville, MA and was described on the
        company records as being 21 years old, light complexion, �grey� eyes, and
        black hair. Cabel told the Massachusetts people that he was from Keokuk, IA,
        but in reality he was an escaped slave from Brunswick, MO. His occupation
        was given as a waiter.

        On August 29, 1865, Pvt. Cabel was mustered out at Charleston, SC.

        Included in his service file is a letter to his wife back in Missouri. As
        you read it, remember that it was illegal for slaves to learn to read and
        write.

        But not only could Cabel write but obviously his wife could read � and
        write. And Cabel's handwriting is very clear and readable, even if he is a
        little original in his spelling!

        I questioned if someone else might have written the letter for him and the
        NARA staffers informed us that they think the literacy rate among the
        soldiers was a lot higher than has been previously thought. Almost all of
        the men from slave states signed their enlistment papers with an �X� �
        perhaps at that moment their trust level with whites was not very high.

        But, the staff said, very quickly the men are writing letters and signing
        documents. Now that Uncle Sam had actually put them in a blue uniform and
        handed them a Springfield, the rules had changed.

        The letter is undated but must be from June or July 1863.

        It is reproduced as written � and my spell check did not like that one
        little bit!

        Take care,

        Bob

        JUDY AND BOB HUDDLESTON
        10643 Sperry Street
        Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
        303.451.6376 adco@...
        Fax: 303.452.3051

        Dear wife i have enlisted in the army i am now in the state of Massachusetts
        but before this letter reaches you i will be in north carolina and though
        great in the present national difficulties yet i look forward to a brighter
        day when i shall have the opertunity of seeing you in the full enjoyment of
        freedom i would like to no if you are still in slavery if you are it will
        not be long before we shall have crushed the system in that now opreses you
        for in the course of three months you shall be at liberty. great is the
        outpouring of the colored people that is now rallying with the hearts of
        lions against that very curse that has separated you and me yet we shall
        meet again and oh what happy time that will be when this ungodly rebellion
        shall be put down and the curse of our land is trampled under our feet i am
        a soldier endeavry to strike at the rebellion that so long has kept us in
        chains. write to me just as soon as you get this letter tell me if you are
        in the same cabin where you use to live. tell eliza i send her my best
        respects and love ike and sully likewise i would send you some money but i
        now it is impossible for you to get it i would like to see little Jenkins
        now but i no it is impossible at present so no more but remain your own
        afectionate husband until death

        Samuel Cabble
      • philip@twinoaks.org
        To: From: Bob Huddleston Date sent: Sun, 29 Oct 2000 18:10:27 -0700 Send reply to:
        Message 3 of 14 , Oct 30, 2000
          To: <adco@...>
          From: "Bob Huddleston" <adco@...>
          Date sent: Sun, 29 Oct 2000 18:10:27 -0700
          Send reply to: civilwarwest@egroups.com
          Subject: [civilwarwest] Letter from a USCT

          Thanks for the great post.
          Philip

          > When doing research every now and then one stumbles across something
          > so powerful that you are taken aback and just sit and stare at it.
          >
          > This is one of those times. I was sitting Friday in the Old Army
          > Records room at the National Archives. A professor from the University
          > of Detroit was being introduced to the Civil War CMSR and Pension
          > records of the United States Colored troops from a couple of staffers
          > who have been working extensively with the files.
          >
          > The letter pasted below is in the file of Private Samuel Cabel (or
          > “Cabelle” as he spelled it), Co. G, 55th Massachusetts Volunteer
          > Infantry (Colored). He enlisted on June 5, 1863 at Readville, MA and
          > was described on the company records as being 21 years old, light
          > complexion, “grey” eyes, and black hair. Cabel told the Massachusetts
          > people that he was from Keokuk, IA, but in reality he was an escaped
          > slave from Brunswick, MO. His occupation was given as a waiter.
          >
          > On August 29, 1865, Pvt. Cabel was mustered out at Charleston, SC.
          >
          > Included in his service file is a letter to his wife back in Missouri.
          > As you read it, remember that it was illegal for slaves to learn to
          > read and write.
          >
          > But not only could Cabel write but obviously his wife could read – and
          > write. And Cabel's handwriting is very clear and readable, even if he
          > is a little original in his spelling!
          >
          > I questioned if someone else might have written the letter for him and
          > the NARA staffers informed us that they think the literacy rate among
          > the soldiers was a lot higher than has been previously thought. Almost
          > all of the men from slave states signed their enlistment papers with
          > an “X” – perhaps at that moment their trust level with whites was not
          > very high.
          >
          > But, the staff said, very quickly the men are writing letters and
          > signing documents. Now that Uncle Sam had actually put them in a blue
          > uniform and handed them a Springfield, the rules had changed.
          >
          > The letter is undated but must be from June or July 1863.
          >
          > It is reproduced as written – and my spell check did not like that one
          > little bit!
          >
          > Take care,
          >
          > Bob
          >
          > JUDY AND BOB HUDDLESTON
          > 10643 Sperry Street
          > Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
          > 303.451.6376 adco@...
          > Fax: 303.452.3051
          >
          > Dear wife i have enlisted in the army i am now in the state of
          > Massachusetts but before this letter reaches you i will be in north
          > carolina and though great in the present national difficulties yet i
          > look forward to a brighter day when i shall have the opertunity of
          > seeing you in the full enjoyment of freedom i would like to no if you
          > are still in slavery if you are it will not be long before we shall
          > have crushed the system in that now opreses you for in the course of
          > three months you shall be at liberty. great is the outpouring of the
          > colored people that is now rallying with the hearts of lions against
          > that very curse that has separated you and me yet we shall meet again
          > and oh what happy time that will be when this ungodly rebellion shall
          > be put down and the curse of our land is trampled under our feet i am
          > a soldier endeavry to strike at the rebellion that so long has kept us
          > in chains. write to me just as soon as you get this letter tell me if
          > you are in the same cabin where you use to live. tell eliza i send her
          > my best respects and love ike and sully likewise i would send you some
          > money but i now it is impossible for you to get it i would like to see
          > little Jenkins now but i no it is impossible at present so no more but
          > remain your own afectionate husband until death
          >
          > Samuel Cabble
          >
          >
          >
          > -------------------------- eGroups Sponsor
          > -------------------------~-~> eLerts It's Easy. It's Fun. Best of All,
          > it's Free! http://click.egroups.com/1/9699/4/_/14182/_/972868106/
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          > ->
          >
          >
          >
        • philip@twinoaks.org
          To: From: Bob Huddleston Date sent: Sun, 29 Oct 2000 18:10:27 -0700 Send reply to:
          Message 4 of 14 , Oct 30, 2000
            To: <adco@...>
            From: "Bob Huddleston" <adco@...>
            Date sent: Sun, 29 Oct 2000 18:10:27 -0700
            Send reply to: civilwarwest@egroups.com
            Subject: [civilwarwest] Letter from a USCT

            Thanks for the great post.
            Philip

            > When doing research every now and then one stumbles across something
            > so powerful that you are taken aback and just sit and stare at it.
            >
            > This is one of those times. I was sitting Friday in the Old Army
            > Records room at the National Archives. A professor from the University
            > of Detroit was being introduced to the Civil War CMSR and Pension
            > records of the United States Colored troops from a couple of staffers
            > who have been working extensively with the files.
            >
            > The letter pasted below is in the file of Private Samuel Cabel (or
            > “Cabelle” as he spelled it), Co. G, 55th Massachusetts Volunteer
            > Infantry (Colored). He enlisted on June 5, 1863 at Readville, MA and
            > was described on the company records as being 21 years old, light
            > complexion, “grey” eyes, and black hair. Cabel told the Massachusetts
            > people that he was from Keokuk, IA, but in reality he was an escaped
            > slave from Brunswick, MO. His occupation was given as a waiter.
            >
            > On August 29, 1865, Pvt. Cabel was mustered out at Charleston, SC.
            >
            > Included in his service file is a letter to his wife back in Missouri.
            > As you read it, remember that it was illegal for slaves to learn to
            > read and write.
            >
            > But not only could Cabel write but obviously his wife could read – and
            > write. And Cabel's handwriting is very clear and readable, even if he
            > is a little original in his spelling!
            >
            > I questioned if someone else might have written the letter for him and
            > the NARA staffers informed us that they think the literacy rate among
            > the soldiers was a lot higher than has been previously thought. Almost
            > all of the men from slave states signed their enlistment papers with
            > an “X” – perhaps at that moment their trust level with whites was not
            > very high.
            >
            > But, the staff said, very quickly the men are writing letters and
            > signing documents. Now that Uncle Sam had actually put them in a blue
            > uniform and handed them a Springfield, the rules had changed.
            >
            > The letter is undated but must be from June or July 1863.
            >
            > It is reproduced as written – and my spell check did not like that one
            > little bit!
            >
            > Take care,
            >
            > Bob
            >
            > JUDY AND BOB HUDDLESTON
            > 10643 Sperry Street
            > Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
            > 303.451.6376 adco@...
            > Fax: 303.452.3051
            >
            > Dear wife i have enlisted in the army i am now in the state of
            > Massachusetts but before this letter reaches you i will be in north
            > carolina and though great in the present national difficulties yet i
            > look forward to a brighter day when i shall have the opertunity of
            > seeing you in the full enjoyment of freedom i would like to no if you
            > are still in slavery if you are it will not be long before we shall
            > have crushed the system in that now opreses you for in the course of
            > three months you shall be at liberty. great is the outpouring of the
            > colored people that is now rallying with the hearts of lions against
            > that very curse that has separated you and me yet we shall meet again
            > and oh what happy time that will be when this ungodly rebellion shall
            > be put down and the curse of our land is trampled under our feet i am
            > a soldier endeavry to strike at the rebellion that so long has kept us
            > in chains. write to me just as soon as you get this letter tell me if
            > you are in the same cabin where you use to live. tell eliza i send her
            > my best respects and love ike and sully likewise i would send you some
            > money but i now it is impossible for you to get it i would like to see
            > little Jenkins now but i no it is impossible at present so no more but
            > remain your own afectionate husband until death
            >
            > Samuel Cabble
            >
            >
            >
            > -------------------------- eGroups Sponsor
            > -------------------------~-~> eLerts It's Easy. It's Fun. Best of All,
            > it's Free! http://click.egroups.com/1/9699/4/_/14182/_/972868106/
            > ---------------------------------------------------------------------_
            > ->
            >
            >
            >
          • grabrulee@aol.com
            Dear Bob, Thank you for the excellent post. I hope your spellchecker is now fully recovered :-) . Reading through Samuel Cabble s letter it struck me that this
            Message 5 of 14 , Nov 1 5:23 PM
              Dear Bob,
              Thank you for the excellent post. I hope your spellchecker is now
              fully recovered :-) .
              Reading through Samuel Cabble's letter it struck me that this is a
              man with no formal education and whose command of the English language was
              entirely self taught. His formal grammar (capitalizing sentences,
              punctuation, etc.) is very clearly lacking but his sentence construction is
              excellent. I would have loved to hear this man speak as there was none of
              the, "De Massa say dat.." kind of English that we are spoon-fed by popular
              authors, TV and movie screenwriters and their ilk.
              Whatever this man's position as a slave, it was clearly in close and
              regular contact with the white members of his community where he had ample
              opportunity to listen and to learn from what he heard. I would suggest that
              he was a carriage driver or butler or some such position rather than the
              occupation stated. I would also suggest that if we English speakers spoke as
              we write, including orally the "mental notes" we employ ("New sentence,
              capital letter", "'know' has a 'k' but it's silent" and so on) this letter
              would have been as good as or better than one written by his former owner.
              And interesting insight into a man who would have been considered
              incapable, because of his color, of leading troops - even troops of the same
              color. I know this is getting way off subject but one of my other great
              passions in life is the game of cricket. Now, you may think that in the
              Twentieth Century attitudes became more liberal. Not so in West Indies
              cricket. I watched the first team to be captained by a black man when touring
              abroad. It was in 1961 and this was from an area with no particular racial
              aspect to their politics as would have been found in, say, South Africa. The
              "official" reason given (if any was ever given) was that a colored man lacked
              the social refinement required for the captain of an international team.
              It looks to me that if Samuel Cabble had still been alive then he may
              well be wondering why he and his fellows ever bothered putting on the
              uniforms of which they were so proud and to pick up their muskets with which
              they felt they could do so much good.
              Just a few rambling (if disconnected) thoughts.
              Best wishes,
              Graham Lee.
              PS. It may interest you to know that of the supposedly "uncultured"
              all black 1961 team, three later received knighthood's from Queen
              Elizabeth...not bad, eh?
            • grabrulee@aol.com
              Dear Bob, Thank you for the excellent post. I hope your spellchecker is now fully recovered :-) . Reading through Samuel Cabble s letter it struck me that this
              Message 6 of 14 , Nov 1 5:23 PM
                Dear Bob,
                Thank you for the excellent post. I hope your spellchecker is now
                fully recovered :-) .
                Reading through Samuel Cabble's letter it struck me that this is a
                man with no formal education and whose command of the English language was
                entirely self taught. His formal grammar (capitalizing sentences,
                punctuation, etc.) is very clearly lacking but his sentence construction is
                excellent. I would have loved to hear this man speak as there was none of
                the, "De Massa say dat.." kind of English that we are spoon-fed by popular
                authors, TV and movie screenwriters and their ilk.
                Whatever this man's position as a slave, it was clearly in close and
                regular contact with the white members of his community where he had ample
                opportunity to listen and to learn from what he heard. I would suggest that
                he was a carriage driver or butler or some such position rather than the
                occupation stated. I would also suggest that if we English speakers spoke as
                we write, including orally the "mental notes" we employ ("New sentence,
                capital letter", "'know' has a 'k' but it's silent" and so on) this letter
                would have been as good as or better than one written by his former owner.
                And interesting insight into a man who would have been considered
                incapable, because of his color, of leading troops - even troops of the same
                color. I know this is getting way off subject but one of my other great
                passions in life is the game of cricket. Now, you may think that in the
                Twentieth Century attitudes became more liberal. Not so in West Indies
                cricket. I watched the first team to be captained by a black man when touring
                abroad. It was in 1961 and this was from an area with no particular racial
                aspect to their politics as would have been found in, say, South Africa. The
                "official" reason given (if any was ever given) was that a colored man lacked
                the social refinement required for the captain of an international team.
                It looks to me that if Samuel Cabble had still been alive then he may
                well be wondering why he and his fellows ever bothered putting on the
                uniforms of which they were so proud and to pick up their muskets with which
                they felt they could do so much good.
                Just a few rambling (if disconnected) thoughts.
                Best wishes,
                Graham Lee.
                PS. It may interest you to know that of the supposedly "uncultured"
                all black 1961 team, three later received knighthood's from Queen
                Elizabeth...not bad, eh?
              • tip87th@msn.com
                ... then he may ... the ... with which ... Graham, You may be interested in this. My better half recently had the honor of attending a small, personal meeting
                Message 7 of 14 , Nov 4 5:15 PM
                  --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, grabrulee@a... wrote:

                  > It looks to me that if Samuel Cabble had still been alive
                  then he may
                  > well be wondering why he and his fellows ever bothered putting on
                  the
                  > uniforms of which they were so proud and to pick up their muskets
                  with which
                  > they felt they could do so much good.
                  > Just a few rambling (if disconnected) thoughts.

                  Graham,

                  You may be interested in this.

                  My better half recently had the honor of attending a small,
                  personal meeting with five members of the 332 Fighter Group during a
                  city aviation management class. Certainly one who lives in Europe
                  would or should be familiar with the "Red Tailed Angels" of the
                  Tuskegee Airmen. Recall that the 332nd never lost a bomber under its
                  escort cover to enemy fighter planes, during the in-route,
                  penetration and withdrawal phases of strategic bomdardment operations
                  all over the European continent during the Second World War.

                  Relevent to your er, ramblings, would be the several questions
                  posed to these gentlemen and lady on the subject of not only their
                  own accomplishments, but on the great strides that they felt had been
                  achieved by the negro race as a whole. The subject of negros in the
                  civil war was raised by Dr. Roscoe Brown who, along with the rest of
                  the panel felt that the addition and recruitment of negros in the
                  Federal Army was the grandfather of civil rights in the U.S.. They
                  personally believe that the 332's record, accomplishments and
                  intigration into the United States military was another keystone to
                  the civl rights movement. Certainly these airmen do not regret their
                  service.

                  Perhaps Mr. Cabble wouldn't be impressed with Dr. Brown's
                  downing of an Me-262 during an escort mission to Berlin on the
                  afternoon of March 24, 1945. The bomber pilots who were escorted by a
                  red-tailed P-51 or P-47 during the war would probably beg to differ.
                  The Tuskegee Airgroup as a whole exceded all expectations with honor
                  and dignity.

                  I would not pretend to argue the fact that imbelcilic racial
                  hatred and sterotyping did not and does not exist today in the world.
                  Yet I use the example and thoughts of these Tuskegee Airmen to refute
                  any notion that Mr. Cabble would be dishonored in his enthusiasm for
                  donning the uniform of the United States of America.

                  Respectfully,

                  Tip
                • tip87th@msn.com
                  ... then he may ... the ... with which ... Graham, You may be interested in this. My better half recently had the honor of attending a small, personal meeting
                  Message 8 of 14 , Nov 4 5:15 PM
                    --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, grabrulee@a... wrote:

                    > It looks to me that if Samuel Cabble had still been alive
                    then he may
                    > well be wondering why he and his fellows ever bothered putting on
                    the
                    > uniforms of which they were so proud and to pick up their muskets
                    with which
                    > they felt they could do so much good.
                    > Just a few rambling (if disconnected) thoughts.

                    Graham,

                    You may be interested in this.

                    My better half recently had the honor of attending a small,
                    personal meeting with five members of the 332 Fighter Group during a
                    city aviation management class. Certainly one who lives in Europe
                    would or should be familiar with the "Red Tailed Angels" of the
                    Tuskegee Airmen. Recall that the 332nd never lost a bomber under its
                    escort cover to enemy fighter planes, during the in-route,
                    penetration and withdrawal phases of strategic bomdardment operations
                    all over the European continent during the Second World War.

                    Relevent to your er, ramblings, would be the several questions
                    posed to these gentlemen and lady on the subject of not only their
                    own accomplishments, but on the great strides that they felt had been
                    achieved by the negro race as a whole. The subject of negros in the
                    civil war was raised by Dr. Roscoe Brown who, along with the rest of
                    the panel felt that the addition and recruitment of negros in the
                    Federal Army was the grandfather of civil rights in the U.S.. They
                    personally believe that the 332's record, accomplishments and
                    intigration into the United States military was another keystone to
                    the civl rights movement. Certainly these airmen do not regret their
                    service.

                    Perhaps Mr. Cabble wouldn't be impressed with Dr. Brown's
                    downing of an Me-262 during an escort mission to Berlin on the
                    afternoon of March 24, 1945. The bomber pilots who were escorted by a
                    red-tailed P-51 or P-47 during the war would probably beg to differ.
                    The Tuskegee Airgroup as a whole exceded all expectations with honor
                    and dignity.

                    I would not pretend to argue the fact that imbelcilic racial
                    hatred and sterotyping did not and does not exist today in the world.
                    Yet I use the example and thoughts of these Tuskegee Airmen to refute
                    any notion that Mr. Cabble would be dishonored in his enthusiasm for
                    donning the uniform of the United States of America.

                    Respectfully,

                    Tip
                  • grabrulee@aol.com
                    Dear Tip, I never, for one moment, meant to denigrate the activities of Negroes in any walk of life nor the genuine achievements they have made in all areas. I
                    Message 9 of 14 , Nov 5 6:45 AM
                      Dear Tip,
                      I never, for one moment, meant to denigrate the activities of Negroes
                      in any walk of life nor the genuine achievements they have made in all areas.
                      I was questioning whether they would see any genuine change in attitude on
                      the part of the non-Negroid world. What real progress has been made (e.g.,
                      the ending of apartheid in S. A.) has been limited to the past two decades
                      while the instance I was quoting referred specifically to the early 1960s.
                      I do not yet have the experience of civil rights issues in the US to
                      comment and it may well be the case that the instigation of USCT units was
                      the beginnings of the Civil Rights movement (though I suspect that devotees
                      of Frederick Douglas and others may take issue with you). I can, however,
                      talk with some authority of the racial situation back in my native UK where,
                      despite many attempts to enforce various and sundry anti-discrimination Acts
                      of Parliament, no real progress has been made in the areas of acceptance.
                      I can quote many examples (especially in the media) to back this up
                      but that is outside the scope of this forum. Let me once more apologize if I
                      inadvertently suggested that Negroes, individually or in groups, had not
                      progressed. What I was actually talking about was whether their CAUSE had
                      actually progressed in the century between the WBTS and the specific instance
                      I quoted.
                      Best wishes,
                      Graham Lee.
                    • grabrulee@aol.com
                      Dear Tip, I never, for one moment, meant to denigrate the activities of Negroes in any walk of life nor the genuine achievements they have made in all areas. I
                      Message 10 of 14 , Nov 5 6:45 AM
                        Dear Tip,
                        I never, for one moment, meant to denigrate the activities of Negroes
                        in any walk of life nor the genuine achievements they have made in all areas.
                        I was questioning whether they would see any genuine change in attitude on
                        the part of the non-Negroid world. What real progress has been made (e.g.,
                        the ending of apartheid in S. A.) has been limited to the past two decades
                        while the instance I was quoting referred specifically to the early 1960s.
                        I do not yet have the experience of civil rights issues in the US to
                        comment and it may well be the case that the instigation of USCT units was
                        the beginnings of the Civil Rights movement (though I suspect that devotees
                        of Frederick Douglas and others may take issue with you). I can, however,
                        talk with some authority of the racial situation back in my native UK where,
                        despite many attempts to enforce various and sundry anti-discrimination Acts
                        of Parliament, no real progress has been made in the areas of acceptance.
                        I can quote many examples (especially in the media) to back this up
                        but that is outside the scope of this forum. Let me once more apologize if I
                        inadvertently suggested that Negroes, individually or in groups, had not
                        progressed. What I was actually talking about was whether their CAUSE had
                        actually progressed in the century between the WBTS and the specific instance
                        I quoted.
                        Best wishes,
                        Graham Lee.
                      • Daniel Giallombardo
                        ... something so ... Records ... Detroit ... the United ... working ... Cabelle ... (Colored). ... the ... grey eyes, and ... Keokuk, IA, ... occupation
                        Message 11 of 14 , Nov 7 6:31 AM
                          --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, "Bob Huddleston" <adco@f...> wrote:
                          > When doing research every now and then one stumbles across
                          something
                          so
                          > powerful that you are taken aback and just sit and stare at it.
                          >
                          > This is one of those times. I was sitting Friday in the Old Army
                          Records
                          > room at the National Archives. A professor from the University of
                          Detroit
                          > was being introduced to the Civil War CMSR and Pension records of
                          the United
                          > States Colored troops from a couple of staffers who have been
                          working
                          > extensively with the files.
                          >
                          > The letter pasted below is in the file of Private Samuel Cabel (or
                          "Cabelle"
                          > as he spelled it), Co. G, 55th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
                          (Colored).
                          > He enlisted on June 5, 1863 at Readville, MA and was described on
                          the
                          > company records as being 21 years old, light complexion,
                          "grey"
                          eyes, and
                          > black hair. Cabel told the Massachusetts people that he was from
                          Keokuk, IA,
                          > but in reality he was an escaped slave from Brunswick, MO. His
                          occupation
                          > was given as a waiter.
                          >
                          > On August 29, 1865, Pvt. Cabel was mustered out at Charleston, SC.
                          >
                          > Included in his service file is a letter to his wife back in
                          Missouri. As
                          > you read it, remember that it was illegal for slaves to learn to
                          read and
                          > write.
                          >
                          > But not only could Cabel write but obviously his wife could read
                          –
                          and
                          > write. And Cabel's handwriting is very clear and readable, even if
                          he is a
                          > little original in his spelling!
                          >
                          > I questioned if someone else might have written the letter for him
                          and the
                          > NARA staffers informed us that they think the literacy rate among
                          the
                          > soldiers was a lot higher than has been previously thought. Almost
                          all of
                          > the men from slave states signed their enlistment papers with an
                          "X"
                          –
                          > perhaps at that moment their trust level with whites was not very
                          high.
                          >
                          > But, the staff said, very quickly the men are writing letters and
                          signing
                          > documents. Now that Uncle Sam had actually put them in a blue
                          uniform and
                          > handed them a Springfield, the rules had changed.
                          >
                          > The letter is undated but must be from June or July 1863.
                          >
                          > It is reproduced as written – and my spell check did not like
                          that
                          one
                          > little bit!
                          >
                          > Take care,
                          >
                          > Bob
                          >
                          > JUDY AND BOB HUDDLESTON
                          > 10643 Sperry Street
                          > Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
                          > 303.451.6376 adco@F...
                          > Fax: 303.452.3051
                          >
                          > Dear wife i have enlisted in the army i am now in the state of
                          Massachusetts
                          > but before this letter reaches you i will be in north carolina and
                          though
                          > great in the present national difficulties yet i look forward to a
                          brighter
                          > day when i shall have the opertunity of seeing you in the full
                          enjoyment of
                          > freedom i would like to no if you are still in slavery if you are
                          it
                          will
                          > not be long before we shall have crushed the system in that now
                          opreses you
                          > for in the course of three months you shall be at liberty. great is
                          the
                          > outpouring of the colored people that is now rallying with the
                          hearts of
                          > lions against that very curse that has separated you and me yet we
                          shall
                          > meet again and oh what happy time that will be when this ungodly
                          rebellion
                          > shall be put down and the curse of our land is trampled under our
                          feet i am
                          > a soldier endeavry to strike at the rebellion that so long has kept
                          us in
                          > chains. write to me just as soon as you get this letter tell me if
                          you are
                          > in the same cabin where you use to live. tell eliza i send her my
                          best
                          > respects and love ike and sully likewise i would send you some
                          money
                          but i
                          > now it is impossible for you to get it i would like to see little
                          Jenkins
                          > now but i no it is impossible at present so no more but remain your
                          own
                          > afectionate husband until death>
                          >

                          Samuel Cabble




                          Bob,

                          Powerful stuff my friend.And movingly written.

                          Dan
                        • Daniel Giallombardo
                          ... something so ... Records ... Detroit ... the United ... working ... Cabelle ... (Colored). ... the ... grey eyes, and ... Keokuk, IA, ... occupation
                          Message 12 of 14 , Nov 7 6:31 AM
                            --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, "Bob Huddleston" <adco@f...> wrote:
                            > When doing research every now and then one stumbles across
                            something
                            so
                            > powerful that you are taken aback and just sit and stare at it.
                            >
                            > This is one of those times. I was sitting Friday in the Old Army
                            Records
                            > room at the National Archives. A professor from the University of
                            Detroit
                            > was being introduced to the Civil War CMSR and Pension records of
                            the United
                            > States Colored troops from a couple of staffers who have been
                            working
                            > extensively with the files.
                            >
                            > The letter pasted below is in the file of Private Samuel Cabel (or
                            "Cabelle"
                            > as he spelled it), Co. G, 55th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
                            (Colored).
                            > He enlisted on June 5, 1863 at Readville, MA and was described on
                            the
                            > company records as being 21 years old, light complexion,
                            "grey"
                            eyes, and
                            > black hair. Cabel told the Massachusetts people that he was from
                            Keokuk, IA,
                            > but in reality he was an escaped slave from Brunswick, MO. His
                            occupation
                            > was given as a waiter.
                            >
                            > On August 29, 1865, Pvt. Cabel was mustered out at Charleston, SC.
                            >
                            > Included in his service file is a letter to his wife back in
                            Missouri. As
                            > you read it, remember that it was illegal for slaves to learn to
                            read and
                            > write.
                            >
                            > But not only could Cabel write but obviously his wife could read
                            –
                            and
                            > write. And Cabel's handwriting is very clear and readable, even if
                            he is a
                            > little original in his spelling!
                            >
                            > I questioned if someone else might have written the letter for him
                            and the
                            > NARA staffers informed us that they think the literacy rate among
                            the
                            > soldiers was a lot higher than has been previously thought. Almost
                            all of
                            > the men from slave states signed their enlistment papers with an
                            "X"
                            –
                            > perhaps at that moment their trust level with whites was not very
                            high.
                            >
                            > But, the staff said, very quickly the men are writing letters and
                            signing
                            > documents. Now that Uncle Sam had actually put them in a blue
                            uniform and
                            > handed them a Springfield, the rules had changed.
                            >
                            > The letter is undated but must be from June or July 1863.
                            >
                            > It is reproduced as written – and my spell check did not like
                            that
                            one
                            > little bit!
                            >
                            > Take care,
                            >
                            > Bob
                            >
                            > JUDY AND BOB HUDDLESTON
                            > 10643 Sperry Street
                            > Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
                            > 303.451.6376 adco@F...
                            > Fax: 303.452.3051
                            >
                            > Dear wife i have enlisted in the army i am now in the state of
                            Massachusetts
                            > but before this letter reaches you i will be in north carolina and
                            though
                            > great in the present national difficulties yet i look forward to a
                            brighter
                            > day when i shall have the opertunity of seeing you in the full
                            enjoyment of
                            > freedom i would like to no if you are still in slavery if you are
                            it
                            will
                            > not be long before we shall have crushed the system in that now
                            opreses you
                            > for in the course of three months you shall be at liberty. great is
                            the
                            > outpouring of the colored people that is now rallying with the
                            hearts of
                            > lions against that very curse that has separated you and me yet we
                            shall
                            > meet again and oh what happy time that will be when this ungodly
                            rebellion
                            > shall be put down and the curse of our land is trampled under our
                            feet i am
                            > a soldier endeavry to strike at the rebellion that so long has kept
                            us in
                            > chains. write to me just as soon as you get this letter tell me if
                            you are
                            > in the same cabin where you use to live. tell eliza i send her my
                            best
                            > respects and love ike and sully likewise i would send you some
                            money
                            but i
                            > now it is impossible for you to get it i would like to see little
                            Jenkins
                            > now but i no it is impossible at present so no more but remain your
                            own
                            > afectionate husband until death>
                            >

                            Samuel Cabble




                            Bob,

                            Powerful stuff my friend.And movingly written.

                            Dan
                          • Bob Huddleston
                            Thanks. I am enjoying finding more out about Pvt. Cabel. Take care, Bob JUDY AND BOB HUDDLESTON 10643 Sperry Street Northglenn, CO 80234-3612 303.451.6376
                            Message 13 of 14 , Nov 7 9:08 AM
                              Thanks. I am enjoying finding more out about Pvt. Cabel.

                              Take care,

                              Bob

                              JUDY AND BOB HUDDLESTON
                              10643 Sperry Street
                              Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
                              303.451.6376 adco@...
                              Fax: 303.452.3051

                              SNIP
                              Bob,

                              Powerful stuff my friend.And movingly written.

                              Dan
                            • Bob Huddleston
                              Thanks. I am enjoying finding more out about Pvt. Cabel. Take care, Bob JUDY AND BOB HUDDLESTON 10643 Sperry Street Northglenn, CO 80234-3612 303.451.6376
                              Message 14 of 14 , Nov 7 9:08 AM
                                Thanks. I am enjoying finding more out about Pvt. Cabel.

                                Take care,

                                Bob

                                JUDY AND BOB HUDDLESTON
                                10643 Sperry Street
                                Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
                                303.451.6376 adco@...
                                Fax: 303.452.3051

                                SNIP
                                Bob,

                                Powerful stuff my friend.And movingly written.

                                Dan
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