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Filibusters

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  • carlw4514
    I never see or hear or read much about this. What s the connection of this term with the modern use of the word? Any suggestions for reading more on the
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 29 3:59 AM
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      I never see or hear or read much about this. What's the connection of
      this term with the modern use of the word? Any suggestions for reading
      more on the history of pre-war filibusters?
    • Jfepperson@aol.com
      In a message dated 8/29/2003 7:01:36 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... I don t know the connection with the modern, political use of the term, but any good book
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 29 4:58 AM
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        In a message dated 8/29/2003 7:01:36 AM Eastern Standard Time, carlw4514@... writes:

        I never see or hear or read much about this. What's the connection of
        this term with the modern use of the word? Any suggestions for reading
        more on the history of pre-war filibusters
        ?


        I don't know the connection with the modern, political use of the
        term, but any good book covering the prologue to the war would
        have some mention of them, as well as pointers to sources.
        Try looking at Nevins and McPherson.

        JFE

      • CashG79@aol.com
        In a message dated 8/29/2003 1:01:16 AM Hawaiian Standard Time, ... Look for references to William Walker, The Grey-eyed Man of Destiny. He was probably the
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 29 5:08 AM
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          In a message dated 8/29/2003 1:01:16 AM Hawaiian Standard Time, carlw4514@... writes:


          I never see or hear or read much about this. What's the connection of
          this term with the modern use of the word? Any suggestions for reading
          more on the history of pre-war filibusters?


          Look for references to William Walker, "The Grey-eyed Man of Destiny."  He was probably the most famous, or infamous, of the filibusters.  Another is John A. Quitman.  Also, the Knights of the Golden Circle.  You can also see histories of US relations with Cuba and Central America. 

          Here are some references I found:

          Laurence Greene, _The Filibuster:  The Career of William Walker_
          William O. Scroggs, _Filibusters and Financiers:  The Story of William Walker and His Associates_
          Edward S. Wallace, _Destiny and Glory_

          There are also references to filibustering in McPherson's _Battle Cry of Freedom_ and in David M. Potter's _The Impending Crisis:  1848-1861_

          Regards,
          Cash
        • LWhite64@aol.com
          Im away on vacation, so I might be able to give more on this when I get back, but the term then meant something completely different than its use today. A
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 29 8:15 AM
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            Im away on vacation, so I might be able to give more on this when I get back, but the term then meant something  completely different than its use today.  A Filibuster in the 1850s refered to an individual that formed a private army and went into another country to take it over.  William Walker was the most sucessful, you also had a rather large effort by Narciso Lopez.  Many future confederate officers cut their teeth fighting in these efforts.

            Lee
          • William H Keene
            ... of ... reading ... To my knowledge, the term was transformed from its historical meaning into its modern political meaning as a result of Congressmen
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 29 8:39 AM
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              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "carlw4514" <carlw4514@y...>
              wrote:
              > I never see or hear or read much about this. What's the connection
              of
              > this term with the modern use of the word? Any suggestions for
              reading
              > more on the history of pre-war filibusters?

              To my knowledge, the term was transformed from its historical meaning
              into its modern political meaning as a result of Congressmen making
              speeches in Congress in which they compared the legislative delaying
              tactics of their opponents to filibusters unjustly hijacking a nation
              and the term stuck as has been used since.

              -Will
            • William H Keene
              ... of ... reading ... A good general review is Manifest Destiny s Underworld: Filibustering in Antebellum America by Robert E. May, UNC Press Though several
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 29 8:55 AM
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                --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "carlw4514" <carlw4514@y...>
                wrote:
                > I never see or hear or read much about this. What's the connection
                of
                > this term with the modern use of the word? Any suggestions for
                reading
                > more on the history of pre-war filibusters?

                A good general review is "Manifest Destiny's Underworld:
                Filibustering in Antebellum America" by Robert E. May, UNC Press

                Though several others have referred to the filibusters of the 1850s,
                the phenomenon is older than that. For example see "Filibusters and
                Expansionists: Jeffersonian Manifest Destiny, 1800-1821" by Frank
                Lawrence Owsley, Jr., and Gene A. Smith.

                -Will
              • GnrlJEJohnston@aol.com
                Walker et al formed an army in attempt to invade and conquer Cuba and bring it into the United States for the purpose of having it as a slave state. They
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 29 7:07 PM
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                  Walker et al formed an army in attempt to invade and conquer Cuba and bring it into the United States for the purpose of having it as a "slave" state.  They were desparate in maintaining parity between the slave states and non slave states in Congress.  Besides those areas in the territories, they hoped that this would be an alternative.  Unfortunately for them, (and possibly fortunate for us) their scheme failed.  Several leaders were captured and sent to Spain for trial.  Others were imprisoned in Cuba.

                  JEJ
                • hartshje
                  Carl, The original term was the Dutch vrijbuiter meaning freebooter, or in our understanding, pirate or buccaneer. The Spanish transformed this to
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 29 8:39 PM
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                    Carl,

                    The original term was the Dutch "vrijbuiter" meaning freebooter, or
                    in our understanding, pirate or buccaneer. The Spanish transformed
                    this to "filibusteros", which is what the Spanish speaking Central
                    Americans called these American adventurers. This was picked up in
                    the American press as "filibusters", and was in common useage by the
                    time Walker came along. I found quite a few websites dedicated to
                    this subject. As far as it's meaning being changed today, I think
                    Will has nailed it. Just like those polititians to usurp a perfectly
                    good word so they can sling some mud!

                    Joe

                    --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "carlw4514"
                    <carlw4514@y...> wrote:
                    > I never see or hear or read much about this.
                    > What's the connection of this term with the
                    > modern use of the word? Any suggestions for
                    > reading more on the history of pre-war
                    > filibusters?
                  • carlw4514
                    hey, great, thanks everybody for some great info; Joe even includes the origins of the word, which I was certainly also wondering about. Carl ... perfectly
                    Message 9 of 12 , Aug 30 4:25 AM
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                      hey, great, thanks everybody for some great info; Joe even includes
                      the origins of the word, which I was certainly also wondering about.
                      Carl

                      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "hartshje" <Hartshje@a...> wrote:
                      > Carl,
                      >
                      > The original term was the Dutch "vrijbuiter" meaning freebooter, or
                      > in our understanding, pirate or buccaneer. The Spanish transformed
                      > this to "filibusteros", which is what the Spanish speaking Central
                      > Americans called these American adventurers. This was picked up in
                      > the American press as "filibusters", and was in common useage by the
                      > time Walker came along. I found quite a few websites dedicated to
                      > this subject. As far as it's meaning being changed today, I think
                      > Will has nailed it. Just like those polititians to usurp a
                      perfectly
                      > good word so they can sling some mud!
                      >
                      > Joe
                      >
                      > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "carlw4514"
                      > <carlw4514@y...> wrote:
                      > > I never see or hear or read much about this.
                      > > What's the connection of this term with the
                      > > modern use of the word? Any suggestions for
                      > > reading more on the history of pre-war
                      > > filibusters?
                    • LWhite64@aol.com
                      Ok, Back from my trip. So here is a few tidbits that apply to this list. Quite a few CS officers that served in the West had experience in the Filibusters,
                      Message 10 of 12 , Sep 1, 2003
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                        Ok,  Back from my trip.  So here is a few tidbits that apply to this list.  Quite a few CS officers that served in the West had experience in the Filibusters, several members of Breckinridge's Staff were part of the failed Lopez Expedition to Cuba in 1851.  Robert Tyler of Tyler's Brigade fame of the AOT was one of Walker's men, so was Col. AF Rudler of the 37th GA.  WHT Walker's brother was also with  William Walker.

                        Lee
                      • GnrlJEJohnston@aol.com
                        In a message dated 9/1/2003 10:38:44 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... As was Crittenden s nephew, William J. Crittenden who was put up before the firing squad in
                        Message 11 of 12 , Sep 1, 2003
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                          In a message dated 9/1/2003 10:38:44 PM Eastern Daylight Time, LWhite64@... writes:

                          Quite a few CS officers that served in the West had experience in the Filibusters, several members of Breckinridge's Staff were part of the failed Lopez Expedition to Cuba in 1851.  Robert Tyler of Tyler's Brigade fame of the AOT was one of Walker's men, so was Col. AF Rudler of the 37th GA.  WHT Walker's brother was also with  William Walker.

                          Lee



                          As was Crittenden's nephew, William J. Crittenden who was put up before the firing squad in Cuba.  Same fate as Walker's in later years.

                          JEJ
                        • LWhite64@aol.com
                          In a message dated 9/1/03 11:26:13 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Almost forgot about Crittenden, he was also supposedly engaged to Lucy Holcomb, who later
                          Message 12 of 12 , Sep 1, 2003
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                            In a message dated 9/1/03 11:26:13 PM Eastern Daylight Time, GnrlJEJohnston@... writes:



                            As was Crittenden's nephew, William J. Crittenden who was put up before the firing squad in Cuba.  Same fate as Walker's in later years.

                            JEJ


                            Almost forgot about Crittenden, he was also supposedly engaged to Lucy Holcomb, who later became Lucy Holcombe Pickens, and was pictured on CS currency, and namesake for the Holcombe Legion of Shanks Evans' Brigade. 
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