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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: N.B. Forrest v Wilder & Minty

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  • LWhite64@aol.com
    This is going to require two postings, as to the Battle with Minty and Johnson, their fight started at Peavine Ridge, several miles to the East of Reed s
    Message 1 of 103 , Aug 1, 2003
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      This is going to require two postings, as to the Battle with Minty and Johnson, their fight started at Peavine Ridge, several miles to the East of Reed's Bridge. From 10 AM on Minty fought a battle very similar to Buford's defence at Gettysburg, taking a position fighting and then falling back, when they finally got to the bridge at 3 PM, Minty started his defence on the East side around the Reed House, Minty kept most of his Brigade on the east side along a small hill that covered the road, he actually ordered a sabre charge by one of his units to drive back Fulton's Brigade, by this time he is facing Johnson's entire Divison, plus Robertson's brigade and the detachment from Forrest. Finally this force pushed Minty back across the bridge, with some of Minty's men having to jump in the creek to escape. Also in this case Minty was armed with Smith Carbines and Burnsides, he had a faster rate of fire at closer range, but Johnson's Divison had a lot of Enfields and Springfields that outranged them, Also add that Johnson had two artillery batteries, one being Bledsoe's Missouri Battery that had Rifled pieces.
      Now as to Forrest's Arms, Davidson's Brigade was the most poorly armed, some of them having smoothbore muskets, HOWEVER, Dibbrell and Armstrong had Enfield and Mississippi Rifles, most of Granger's men had Springfields and Enfields, virtually the same as to rate of fire and range.

      Back to work,
      Lee
    • DPowell334@AOL.COM
      In a message dated 8/4/2003 10:51:45 AM Central Standard Time, ... That is of course, relative. It depends what other missions those men were needed for. Since
      Message 103 of 103 , Aug 4, 2003
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        In a message dated 8/4/2003 10:51:45 AM Central Standard Time, clarkc@... writes:


        Hindsight is 20-20, but I wonder if using 4800 men, or more, to delay
        or stop 4000 is good command management by the Confederates?



        That is of course, relative. It depends what other missions those men were needed for. Since they did not really execute any other missions on the 20th, I think that stopping Granger was a viable plan.

        Dave Powell
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