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Re: Bragg and Longstreet

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  • carlw4514
    I ll let Joe speak for himself, but see my comments below. ... wrote: [...] ... I doubt if Joe intended to discourage you. In any case,
    Message 1 of 189 , Aug 1, 2003
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      I'll let Joe speak for himself, but see my comments below.
      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Peters"
      <col_freemantle@y...> wrote:
      [...]
      >
      >
      > > The long simmering resentment of some of the major generals under

      > > Bragg found a spokesperson in Longstreet, thinking his fame,
      > > prestige and contribution to victories would be enough to finally
      > > persuade Davis to remove Bragg. This topic has been thoroughly
      > > hashed over, and you can search the group messages if you would
      > > like to read those discussions.
      >
      > I appreciate the response and your analysis of the situation. You
      > might be very well correct with your assumptions. However, I am
      > disappointed that you intimate that this needn't be dicussed any
      > further as longer serving members have previously discussed it
      > ie. "thoroughly hashed over" the subject. This leaves me in a
      > quandary as to whether I should continue posting if they're so
      > obviously 'old hat'. I would like to think that a new perspective
      > would be of at least some interest!


      I doubt if Joe intended to discourage you. In any case, feel free to
      ignore any such suspected motives; if you have a thread no one is
      interested in, you will find it ignored by the group. Trust me on
      this!



      [...]
      >
      > The point I was making illustrated the fact that there was no trust
      > between Bragg and his Officers at Chickamauga. The point I raised
      > was about a lack of communication between Bragg and Longstreet, and
      > that there was the possibility that fault shouldn't necessarily be
      > laid at the door of one person alone. However, much Bragg is used
      as
      > a 'whipping boy' by some. [...] Life tells us that truth is
      > usually somewhere in between.



      I suppose you are right, but the more I study the war in the west the
      more I come to the conclusion that Davis's steady reliance on Bragg
      was unacceptable. The very idea that an Army Commander would continue
      in that role with the open dissent of so many of his Corp and Division
      leaders, when Davis could have done something about it, is absurd to
      the nth degree. *And* had severe consequences.




      [...]
      > Right or wrong, Bragg was C-in-C, and made Longstreet's behaviour
      out of order!
      >
      > Mark Peters



      Can't argue with that. I would have a lot more respect for
      Longstreet and the other members of the cabal if all these generals
      followed up by resigning when Bragg continued as Commander.
      Carl
    • LWhite64@aol.com
      Bragg had a lot of health problems, he suffered from chronic migranes, stomach ailments that probably led to his bouts with chronic dysentery, boils, and
      Message 189 of 189 , Jun 14, 2006
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        Bragg had a lot of health problems, he suffered from chronic migranes, stomach ailments that probably led to his bouts with chronic dysentery, boils, and probably heart disease.  Bragg also showed symptomes of manic-depression as well. 
         
        Lee
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