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SHORT SIEGE OF FORSYTH

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  • jaaah@tbcnet.com
    Hey all! I have rewritten this essay and I hope it is enjoyed. Addison ... SHORT SIEGE OF FORSYTH by Addison Hart JULY, 1861, HAD NOT BEEN GOOD FOR THE FEDERAL
    Message 1 of 20 , Oct 2, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
          Hey all! I have rewritten this essay and I hope it is enjoyed. 

      Addison
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            SHORT SIEGE OF
                   FORSYTH

                                                   
      by Addison Hart

      JULY, 1861, HAD NOT BEEN GOOD FOR THE FEDERAL ARMY IN 
      MISSOURI. The Commander of the Army of the West, Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon 
      had, perhaps unwisely, made war on Missouri Governor Claiborne Fox Jackson's pro-
      Southern Missouri State Guard. Intially, Lyon was met with success, taking Camp Jackson 
      outside St. Louis, Jefferson the Capital, and winning a small victory at Boonville, but became 
      overly ambitious and allowed his army to be split. This break-off group was commanded by 
      Brigadier General Thomas William Sweeny, an Irish born, one armed old fighter with a mean 
      temper. Sweeny's second in command, Colonel Franz Sigel, another old foreign soldier, has 
      rashly attacked Jackson at Carthage and was repulsed. In mid-July, Lyon met with Sigel and 
      Sweeny at Springfield, Missouri to ascertain the strength, location, and intent of the Missouri 
      State Guard.

       Now it was well known that there was considerable Missouri State Guard activity at the 
      town of Forsyth, the county seat of Taney County. The town was surrounded by water. The 
      White River on the left and on the right was Swan Creek. Major General Sterling Price, in 
      command of the Guard, was receiving supplies via theWhite River. Lyon had been aware of 
      this for sometime and had earlier sent Captain Jesse Galloway and Lieutenant F. Michael 
      Gideon, Senior, and their Christian and Taney Home Guards to take the town. Galloway's 
      shortlived attack proved to be a failure and Forsyth still received supplies. Lyon ordered 
      Sweeny to take his command and seize the town.

       Thomas Sweeny had 1,200 men. 500 men were in the 1st Iowa Regiment under Lieutenant 
      Colonel William H. Merritt. Of the 1st Iowa, the Governor Grays were commanded by 
      Captain Francis J. Herron (who would gain a generalship at Pea Ridge and a name at Prairie 
      Grove) and the Davenport Rifles were under the command of Captain Henry Wentz. Sweeny 
      had one section of Captain James Totten's Battery, consisting of a 12 pound howitzer and a 
      6 pounder, under the command of Lieutenant George Sokalski. Two well organized 
      companies of cavalry ("C" and "D" of the U.S. Dragoons) were under commands of Captain 
      David S. Stanley and Lt. M. J. Kelley. The 2nd Kansas Infantry was commanded by Col. 
      Robert B. Mitchell. With Mitchell was the disorganized Mounted Kansas Volunteers (about 
      80 men) under the command of Captain Samuel N. Wood. Last there was Galloway's 
      veterans, now down to a mere 80 men. With Sweeny was the former sheriff of Taney 
      County, John M. Layton, a 1st Lieutenant under Galloway and Sweeny's guide. Layton's 
      brother was Southern sympathizer Dr. A.S. Layton.

       On Saturday, July 20th, at noon, Sweeny left Springfield for Forsyth. When he arrived at 
      6:00 p.m. on the 22nd, Sweeny formed his plan of attack. He wanted to make his approach 
      a surprise to the "hostile force". The Guard was placed on the bluffs overlooking the town, in 
      a good position. A portion of the Guard (unknown to Sweeny) were placed in the brush on 
      the crest of the hill on the main road into the town and more hidden in trees across the river. 
      Sweeny ordered Stanley's Dragoons to approach the town from the main road and Wood 
      and his rangers swept round to the right for an attack on the flank. Three and a alf miles from 
      the town, Wood was fired upon by pickets and he ordered a charge. His men captured two 
      pickets who informed him that there were only 150 Guardsmen in the town. Now Sweeny 
      ordered Stanley and Wood to move in on the town and attack. In the attack, Stanley lost 
      two men wounded. Near the town, a Guardsmen shot Stanley's horse from under him and 
      Stanley was thrown and suffered minor injuries. Sweeny tells us what happened next in his 
      official report: "After they had passed on, and before the remainder of my force had 
      come up, one of the prisoners remarked, "If that is all you have you will get badly 
      whipped, for we have a thousand men in Forsyth." Supposing this statement might 
      be true, although contradictory of his former assertion, I disptached an order to 
      Captain Stanley to keep the enemy in check if he found the resistance formidable, 
      while I hastened forward with the artillery and infantry to his support." 
      Needless to 
      say, the Missouri State Guard in Forsyth only contained 150 men under a Major Franklin, 
      Captain John Price, Capt. Jackson, and Capt. Wyatt. By now the Guard knew of Sweeny's 
      advance and fired a volley from the thickets that took down several men. As the infantry 
      pressed on they fired more scattered volleys at the advancing men. 

       George Sokalski received orders from Sweeny to bear his artillery on the town, but Sokalski 
      misunderstood this. He unlimbered his 12 pounder and lobbed three shells into the 
      courthouse, a depository of supplies. He then realized his mistake. Sweeny then assumed the 
      Guard was making a stand in the courthouse and ordered Sokalski forward. Sokalski was 
      then ordered to fire canister into the courthouse and three shots were fired, killing several 
      men and demolishing the top of the courthouse. Then a sniper shot one of Sweeny's men 
      dead. In the town, Captain Jackson of the Guard was hit by a volley, killed immediatly by 7 
      bullets. The fighting then seemed to stop. Sweeny had taken from the South very little, 5 
      dead, 3 captured, 7 horses captured, a quantity of arms, munitions, flour, meal, sugar, sirup, 
      salt, clothing, cloth, mule and horse shoes. The entire affair lasted only an hour. Early the 
      23rd Sweeny abandoned his campaign and withdrew, arriving in Springfield on the 25th. The 
      Guardsmen returned to their homes and bussinesses in the town. Forsyth had been saved. 
      Sweeny would become a Major General like Sigel, but the Army of the West was smashed 
      at Wilson's Creek on August 10th, 1861 and Lyon was killed. Forsyth remained in the hands 
      of the South until 1862.
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Download NeoPlanet at http://www.neoplanet.com
    • jaaah@tbcnet.com
      Hey all! I have rewritten this essay and I hope it is enjoyed. Addison ... SHORT SIEGE OF FORSYTH by Addison Hart JULY, 1861, HAD NOT BEEN GOOD FOR THE FEDERAL
      Message 2 of 20 , Oct 2, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
            Hey all! I have rewritten this essay and I hope it is enjoyed. 

        Addison
        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              SHORT SIEGE OF
                     FORSYTH

                                                     
        by Addison Hart

        JULY, 1861, HAD NOT BEEN GOOD FOR THE FEDERAL ARMY IN 
        MISSOURI. The Commander of the Army of the West, Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon 
        had, perhaps unwisely, made war on Missouri Governor Claiborne Fox Jackson's pro-
        Southern Missouri State Guard. Intially, Lyon was met with success, taking Camp Jackson 
        outside St. Louis, Jefferson the Capital, and winning a small victory at Boonville, but became 
        overly ambitious and allowed his army to be split. This break-off group was commanded by 
        Brigadier General Thomas William Sweeny, an Irish born, one armed old fighter with a mean 
        temper. Sweeny's second in command, Colonel Franz Sigel, another old foreign soldier, has 
        rashly attacked Jackson at Carthage and was repulsed. In mid-July, Lyon met with Sigel and 
        Sweeny at Springfield, Missouri to ascertain the strength, location, and intent of the Missouri 
        State Guard.

         Now it was well known that there was considerable Missouri State Guard activity at the 
        town of Forsyth, the county seat of Taney County. The town was surrounded by water. The 
        White River on the left and on the right was Swan Creek. Major General Sterling Price, in 
        command of the Guard, was receiving supplies via theWhite River. Lyon had been aware of 
        this for sometime and had earlier sent Captain Jesse Galloway and Lieutenant F. Michael 
        Gideon, Senior, and their Christian and Taney Home Guards to take the town. Galloway's 
        shortlived attack proved to be a failure and Forsyth still received supplies. Lyon ordered 
        Sweeny to take his command and seize the town.

         Thomas Sweeny had 1,200 men. 500 men were in the 1st Iowa Regiment under Lieutenant 
        Colonel William H. Merritt. Of the 1st Iowa, the Governor Grays were commanded by 
        Captain Francis J. Herron (who would gain a generalship at Pea Ridge and a name at Prairie 
        Grove) and the Davenport Rifles were under the command of Captain Henry Wentz. Sweeny 
        had one section of Captain James Totten's Battery, consisting of a 12 pound howitzer and a 
        6 pounder, under the command of Lieutenant George Sokalski. Two well organized 
        companies of cavalry ("C" and "D" of the U.S. Dragoons) were under commands of Captain 
        David S. Stanley and Lt. M. J. Kelley. The 2nd Kansas Infantry was commanded by Col. 
        Robert B. Mitchell. With Mitchell was the disorganized Mounted Kansas Volunteers (about 
        80 men) under the command of Captain Samuel N. Wood. Last there was Galloway's 
        veterans, now down to a mere 80 men. With Sweeny was the former sheriff of Taney 
        County, John M. Layton, a 1st Lieutenant under Galloway and Sweeny's guide. Layton's 
        brother was Southern sympathizer Dr. A.S. Layton.

         On Saturday, July 20th, at noon, Sweeny left Springfield for Forsyth. When he arrived at 
        6:00 p.m. on the 22nd, Sweeny formed his plan of attack. He wanted to make his approach 
        a surprise to the "hostile force". The Guard was placed on the bluffs overlooking the town, in 
        a good position. A portion of the Guard (unknown to Sweeny) were placed in the brush on 
        the crest of the hill on the main road into the town and more hidden in trees across the river. 
        Sweeny ordered Stanley's Dragoons to approach the town from the main road and Wood 
        and his rangers swept round to the right for an attack on the flank. Three and a alf miles from 
        the town, Wood was fired upon by pickets and he ordered a charge. His men captured two 
        pickets who informed him that there were only 150 Guardsmen in the town. Now Sweeny 
        ordered Stanley and Wood to move in on the town and attack. In the attack, Stanley lost 
        two men wounded. Near the town, a Guardsmen shot Stanley's horse from under him and 
        Stanley was thrown and suffered minor injuries. Sweeny tells us what happened next in his 
        official report: "After they had passed on, and before the remainder of my force had 
        come up, one of the prisoners remarked, "If that is all you have you will get badly 
        whipped, for we have a thousand men in Forsyth." Supposing this statement might 
        be true, although contradictory of his former assertion, I disptached an order to 
        Captain Stanley to keep the enemy in check if he found the resistance formidable, 
        while I hastened forward with the artillery and infantry to his support." 
        Needless to 
        say, the Missouri State Guard in Forsyth only contained 150 men under a Major Franklin, 
        Captain John Price, Capt. Jackson, and Capt. Wyatt. By now the Guard knew of Sweeny's 
        advance and fired a volley from the thickets that took down several men. As the infantry 
        pressed on they fired more scattered volleys at the advancing men. 

         George Sokalski received orders from Sweeny to bear his artillery on the town, but Sokalski 
        misunderstood this. He unlimbered his 12 pounder and lobbed three shells into the 
        courthouse, a depository of supplies. He then realized his mistake. Sweeny then assumed the 
        Guard was making a stand in the courthouse and ordered Sokalski forward. Sokalski was 
        then ordered to fire canister into the courthouse and three shots were fired, killing several 
        men and demolishing the top of the courthouse. Then a sniper shot one of Sweeny's men 
        dead. In the town, Captain Jackson of the Guard was hit by a volley, killed immediatly by 7 
        bullets. The fighting then seemed to stop. Sweeny had taken from the South very little, 5 
        dead, 3 captured, 7 horses captured, a quantity of arms, munitions, flour, meal, sugar, sirup, 
        salt, clothing, cloth, mule and horse shoes. The entire affair lasted only an hour. Early the 
        23rd Sweeny abandoned his campaign and withdrew, arriving in Springfield on the 25th. The 
        Guardsmen returned to their homes and bussinesses in the town. Forsyth had been saved. 
        Sweeny would become a Major General like Sigel, but the Army of the West was smashed 
        at Wilson's Creek on August 10th, 1861 and Lyon was killed. Forsyth remained in the hands 
        of the South until 1862.
        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Download NeoPlanet at http://www.neoplanet.com
      • tip87th@msn.com
        ... Addison, Very enjoyable. Thank you for submitting it. Do you do much research on Missouri in the WBTS? Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob,
        Message 3 of 20 , Oct 9, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, jaaah@t... wrote:
          > Hey all! I have rewritten this essay and I hope it is enjoyed.


          Addison,

          Very enjoyable. Thank you for submitting it.

          Do you do much research on Missouri in the WBTS?

          Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob, and I
          recently read a fine overview on this same battle from a Missouri
          Natural Resources Bulletin. Missouri boasts of over 1000 clashes in
          the WBTS. Third in number behind Virginia and Tennessee. I'm sure
          they would be interested in your essay. Anyway, thanks again for the
          Short Siege of Forsyth.

          Tip
        • tip87th@msn.com
          ... Addison, Very enjoyable. Thank you for submitting it. Do you do much research on Missouri in the WBTS? Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob,
          Message 4 of 20 , Oct 9, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, jaaah@t... wrote:
            > Hey all! I have rewritten this essay and I hope it is enjoyed.


            Addison,

            Very enjoyable. Thank you for submitting it.

            Do you do much research on Missouri in the WBTS?

            Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob, and I
            recently read a fine overview on this same battle from a Missouri
            Natural Resources Bulletin. Missouri boasts of over 1000 clashes in
            the WBTS. Third in number behind Virginia and Tennessee. I'm sure
            they would be interested in your essay. Anyway, thanks again for the
            Short Siege of Forsyth.

            Tip
          • jaaah@tbcnet.com
            ... Why thanks, Tip. ... Well, actually I do. Doing research for a biography on John Sappington Marmaduke (who started out and ended his battling days in
            Message 5 of 20 , Oct 27, 2000
            • 0 Attachment
              > Addison,
              >
              > Very enjoyable. Thank you for submitting it.

              Why thanks, Tip.

              >
              > Do you do much research on Missouri in the WBTS?

              Well, actually I do. Doing research for a biography on John Sappington Marmaduke (who started out and ended his battling days in Missouri). I'm just a specialist on the year 1861 in particular (mainly because nobody else is). 1861's always been my big interest do the the little amount of research done on the battles and events of that year. In most histories of the Civil War 1861 gets about 50 pages at the most and much of it is taken up with 1st Manassas. However, in my opinion, the first 'battle' of the war wasn't Manassas, but Carthage Missouri, July 5th, 1861.

              >
              > Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob, and I
              > recently read a fine overview on this same battle from a Missouri
              > Natural Resources Bulletin. Missouri boasts of over 1000 clashes in
              > the WBTS. Third in number behind Virginia and Tennessee. I'm sure
              > they would be interested in your essay. Anyway, thanks again for the
              > Short Siege of Forsyth.
              >
              > Tip
              >
              >

              Tip:
              How would I get my essay to the Natural Resources Bulletin?

              All my best,
              Addison Hart


              Download NeoPlanet at http://www.neoplanet.com
            • jaaah@tbcnet.com
              ... Why thanks, Tip. ... Well, actually I do. Doing research for a biography on John Sappington Marmaduke (who started out and ended his battling days in
              Message 6 of 20 , Oct 27, 2000
              • 0 Attachment
                > Addison,
                >
                > Very enjoyable. Thank you for submitting it.

                Why thanks, Tip.

                >
                > Do you do much research on Missouri in the WBTS?

                Well, actually I do. Doing research for a biography on John Sappington Marmaduke (who started out and ended his battling days in Missouri). I'm just a specialist on the year 1861 in particular (mainly because nobody else is). 1861's always been my big interest do the the little amount of research done on the battles and events of that year. In most histories of the Civil War 1861 gets about 50 pages at the most and much of it is taken up with 1st Manassas. However, in my opinion, the first 'battle' of the war wasn't Manassas, but Carthage Missouri, July 5th, 1861.

                >
                > Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob, and I
                > recently read a fine overview on this same battle from a Missouri
                > Natural Resources Bulletin. Missouri boasts of over 1000 clashes in
                > the WBTS. Third in number behind Virginia and Tennessee. I'm sure
                > they would be interested in your essay. Anyway, thanks again for the
                > Short Siege of Forsyth.
                >
                > Tip
                >
                >

                Tip:
                How would I get my essay to the Natural Resources Bulletin?

                All my best,
                Addison Hart


                Download NeoPlanet at http://www.neoplanet.com
              • John T. Coleman
                ... Twice a year, I load up the wife and kids and make the drive from Michigan to Texas. I ve always wondered if there were any sites to visit in Missouri
                Message 7 of 20 , Oct 28, 2000
                • 0 Attachment
                  > Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob, and I
                  > recently read a fine overview on this same battle from a Missouri
                  > Natural Resources Bulletin. Missouri boasts of over 1000 clashes in
                  > the WBTS.

                  Twice a year, I load up the wife and kids and make the drive from
                  Michigan to Texas. I've always wondered if there were any sites to
                  visit in Missouri along the Mississippi. Any help?

                  If there are, any ideas on how to persuade my wife to take a short
                  detour and get to her family a little later?

                  John
                • John T. Coleman
                  ... Twice a year, I load up the wife and kids and make the drive from Michigan to Texas. I ve always wondered if there were any sites to visit in Missouri
                  Message 8 of 20 , Oct 28, 2000
                  • 0 Attachment
                    > Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob, and I
                    > recently read a fine overview on this same battle from a Missouri
                    > Natural Resources Bulletin. Missouri boasts of over 1000 clashes in
                    > the WBTS.

                    Twice a year, I load up the wife and kids and make the drive from
                    Michigan to Texas. I've always wondered if there were any sites to
                    visit in Missouri along the Mississippi. Any help?

                    If there are, any ideas on how to persuade my wife to take a short
                    detour and get to her family a little later?

                    John
                  • jrayelliot@aol.com
                    John, Missouri ranked third in the total number of actions fought. Ithink you will not have much trouble finding a site. As for help convincing the wife to
                    Message 9 of 20 , Oct 28, 2000
                    • 0 Attachment
                      John,
                      Missouri ranked third in the total number of actions fought. Ithink you will
                      not have much trouble finding a site. As for help convincing the wife to
                      detour, sorry you are on your own on that one.

                      Ray
                    • jrayelliot@aol.com
                      John, Missouri ranked third in the total number of actions fought. Ithink you will not have much trouble finding a site. As for help convincing the wife to
                      Message 10 of 20 , Oct 28, 2000
                      • 0 Attachment
                        John,
                        Missouri ranked third in the total number of actions fought. Ithink you will
                        not have much trouble finding a site. As for help convincing the wife to
                        detour, sorry you are on your own on that one.

                        Ray
                      • tip87th@msn.com
                        ... John, The Fort Davidson State Historical Site in Pilot Knob is about 70 miles west on ST. Hwy 72 off I-55. Or you can take ol 67 from Festus and hit St.
                        Message 11 of 20 , Oct 28, 2000
                        • 0 Attachment
                          --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, "John T. Coleman" <jtcoleman@p...>
                          wrote:
                          > Twice a year, I load up the wife and kids and make the drive from
                          > Michigan to Texas. I've always wondered if there were any sites to
                          > visit in Missouri along the Mississippi. Any help?
                          >
                          > If there are, any ideas on how to persuade my wife to take a short
                          > detour and get to her family a little later?


                          John,
                          The Fort Davidson State Historical Site in Pilot Knob is about 70
                          miles west on ST. Hwy 72 off I-55. Or you can take ol'67 from Festus
                          and hit St. Hwy 32 to St. Hwy 21 which runs south through Pilot Knob.
                          Either way it's a nice break from the interstate.
                          I've found a good site for CW battles in Missouri it's called
                          Civil War Battles in and around Missouri at
                          www.mid-mo.net/dpara/civilwar/battles
                          The site has overviews along with maps for many Missouri frays.
                          Enjoy. Sincerely Tip
                        • tip87th@msn.com
                          ... John, The Fort Davidson State Historical Site in Pilot Knob is about 70 miles west on ST. Hwy 72 off I-55. Or you can take ol 67 from Festus and hit St.
                          Message 12 of 20 , Oct 28, 2000
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                            --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, "John T. Coleman" <jtcoleman@p...>
                            wrote:
                            > Twice a year, I load up the wife and kids and make the drive from
                            > Michigan to Texas. I've always wondered if there were any sites to
                            > visit in Missouri along the Mississippi. Any help?
                            >
                            > If there are, any ideas on how to persuade my wife to take a short
                            > detour and get to her family a little later?


                            John,
                            The Fort Davidson State Historical Site in Pilot Knob is about 70
                            miles west on ST. Hwy 72 off I-55. Or you can take ol'67 from Festus
                            and hit St. Hwy 32 to St. Hwy 21 which runs south through Pilot Knob.
                            Either way it's a nice break from the interstate.
                            I've found a good site for CW battles in Missouri it's called
                            Civil War Battles in and around Missouri at
                            www.mid-mo.net/dpara/civilwar/battles
                            The site has overviews along with maps for many Missouri frays.
                            Enjoy. Sincerely Tip
                          • tip87th@msn.com
                            ... in
                            Message 13 of 20 , Oct 28, 2000
                            • 0 Attachment
                              --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, "John T. Coleman" <jtcoleman@p...>
                              wrote:
                              > > Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob, and I
                              > > recently read a fine overview on this same battle from a Missouri
                              > > Natural Resources Bulletin. Missouri boasts of over 1000 clashes
                              in
                              > > the WBTS.
                              >
                              > Twice a year, I load up the wife and kids and make the drive from
                              > Michigan to Texas. I've always wondered if there were any sites to
                              > visit in Missouri along the Mississippi. Any help?
                              >
                              > If there are, any ideas on how to persuade my wife to take a short
                              > detour and get to her family a little later?
                              >
                              > John
                            • tip87th@msn.com
                              ... in
                              Message 14 of 20 , Oct 28, 2000
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                                --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, "John T. Coleman" <jtcoleman@p...>
                                wrote:
                                > > Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob, and I
                                > > recently read a fine overview on this same battle from a Missouri
                                > > Natural Resources Bulletin. Missouri boasts of over 1000 clashes
                                in
                                > > the WBTS.
                                >
                                > Twice a year, I load up the wife and kids and make the drive from
                                > Michigan to Texas. I've always wondered if there were any sites to
                                > visit in Missouri along the Mississippi. Any help?
                                >
                                > If there are, any ideas on how to persuade my wife to take a short
                                > detour and get to her family a little later?
                                >
                                > John
                              • tip87th@msn.com
                                ... Addison, Here is an address which might prove helpful: Missouri Department of Natural Resources Division of Parks and Historical Preservation P.O. Box 176
                                Message 15 of 20 , Oct 28, 2000
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                                  >
                                  > Tip:
                                  > How would I get my essay to the Natural Resources Bulletin?


                                  Addison,

                                  Here is an address which might prove helpful:
                                  Missouri Department of Natural Resources
                                  Division of Parks and Historical Preservation
                                  P.O. Box 176
                                  Jefferson City, Mo. 65102

                                  This was the address given for the Pilot Knob bulletin. Hope they
                                  steer you in the proper direction.
                                  Sincerely, Tip
                                • tip87th@msn.com
                                  ... Addison, Here is an address which might prove helpful: Missouri Department of Natural Resources Division of Parks and Historical Preservation P.O. Box 176
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Oct 28, 2000
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    >
                                    > Tip:
                                    > How would I get my essay to the Natural Resources Bulletin?


                                    Addison,

                                    Here is an address which might prove helpful:
                                    Missouri Department of Natural Resources
                                    Division of Parks and Historical Preservation
                                    P.O. Box 176
                                    Jefferson City, Mo. 65102

                                    This was the address given for the Pilot Knob bulletin. Hope they
                                    steer you in the proper direction.
                                    Sincerely, Tip
                                  • Margaret D. Blough
                                    Message text written by INTERNET:civilwarwest@egroups.com ... in ...
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Oct 29, 2000
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                                      Message text written by INTERNET:civilwarwest@egroups.com
                                      >
                                      --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, "John T. Coleman" <jtcoleman@p...>
                                      wrote:
                                      > > Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob, and I
                                      > > recently read a fine overview on this same battle from a Missouri
                                      > > Natural Resources Bulletin. Missouri boasts of over 1000 clashes
                                      in
                                      > > the WBTS.
                                      >
                                      > Twice a year, I load up the wife and kids and make the drive from
                                      > Michigan to Texas. I've always wondered if there were any sites to
                                      > visit in Missouri along the Mississippi. Any help?
                                      >
                                      > If there are, any ideas on how to persuade my wife to take a short
                                      > detour and get to her family a little later?
                                      >
                                      > John
                                      <

                                      There's a National Park at Wilson's Creek.

                                      Regards,

                                      Margaret D. Blough
                                    • Margaret D. Blough
                                      Message text written by INTERNET:civilwarwest@egroups.com ... in ...
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Oct 29, 2000
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                                        Message text written by INTERNET:civilwarwest@egroups.com
                                        >
                                        --- In civilwarwest@egroups.com, "John T. Coleman" <jtcoleman@p...>
                                        wrote:
                                        > > Shotgun has a good item on the Battle of Pilot Knob, and I
                                        > > recently read a fine overview on this same battle from a Missouri
                                        > > Natural Resources Bulletin. Missouri boasts of over 1000 clashes
                                        in
                                        > > the WBTS.
                                        >
                                        > Twice a year, I load up the wife and kids and make the drive from
                                        > Michigan to Texas. I've always wondered if there were any sites to
                                        > visit in Missouri along the Mississippi. Any help?
                                        >
                                        > If there are, any ideas on how to persuade my wife to take a short
                                        > detour and get to her family a little later?
                                        >
                                        > John
                                        <

                                        There's a National Park at Wilson's Creek.

                                        Regards,

                                        Margaret D. Blough
                                      • John T. Coleman
                                        ... Great! Thanks! John
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Oct 29, 2000
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                                          > I've found a good site for CW battles in Missouri it's called
                                          > Civil War Battles in and around Missouri at
                                          > www.mid-mo.net/dpara/civilwar/battles
                                          > The site has overviews along with maps for many Missouri frays.

                                          Great! Thanks!

                                          John
                                        • John T. Coleman
                                          ... Great! Thanks! John
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Oct 29, 2000
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                                            > I've found a good site for CW battles in Missouri it's called
                                            > Civil War Battles in and around Missouri at
                                            > www.mid-mo.net/dpara/civilwar/battles
                                            > The site has overviews along with maps for many Missouri frays.

                                            Great! Thanks!

                                            John
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