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Quaker guns at Fort Donelson

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  • moenwanda
    From various correspondences in the O.R. it is clear that the Confederates were short of artillery at Fort Donelson. That being the case, one would think that
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 6, 2003
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      From various correspondences in the O.R. it is clear that the
      Confederates were short of artillery at Fort Donelson. That being
      the case, one would think that they would have resorted to the use of
      Quaker guns on the land side. This stands to reason considering
      this "bogus artillery" was used at Columbus and Corinth (not to
      mention various other locations in the east in 1862.) For some
      reason, I can not finds any mention of their use at Fort Donelson.
      Is anyone aware of any primary source material that would help to
      confirm their existence at Donelson?

      Best regards,

      Moe
    • theme_music
      I don t recall any mention either, though my own review of the primary literature is certainly not exhaustive, nor my memory flawless. Gilmer s reports
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 7, 2003
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        I don't recall any mention either, though my own review of the
        primary literature is certainly not exhaustive, nor my memory
        flawless. Gilmer's reports indicate that a tremendous amount of the
        work on the land side fortifications was not undertaken until
        February. I would surmise that the available field batteries (7
        IINM) arriving in the week before the surrender were sufficient to
        man the emplacements as they were completed.

        Eric



        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "moenwanda"
        <all_for_the_union@u...> wrote:
        > From various correspondences in the O.R. it is clear that the
        > Confederates were short of artillery at Fort Donelson. That being
        > the case, one would think that they would have resorted to the use
        of
        > Quaker guns on the land side. This stands to reason considering
        > this "bogus artillery" was used at Columbus and Corinth (not to
        > mention various other locations in the east in 1862.) For some
        > reason, I can not finds any mention of their use at Fort Donelson.
        > Is anyone aware of any primary source material that would help to
        > confirm their existence at Donelson?
        >
        > Best regards,
        >
        > Moe
      • Jfepperson@aol.com
        I wonder if this isn t due to a confusion about Bushrod Johnson --- who was a Quaker, IIRC --- being present on the Confederate side? JFE
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 7, 2003
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          I wonder if this isn't due to a confusion about
          Bushrod Johnson --- who was a Quaker, IIRC ---
          being present on the Confederate side?

          JFE
        • hank9174
          I m a bit perplexed as to how William C. Quantrill became a guerilla leader. He was from Ohio, moved to eastern Kansas in the late 1850s, wasn t involved in
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 7, 2003
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            I'm a bit perplexed as to how William C. Quantrill became a guerilla
            leader.

            He was from Ohio, moved to eastern Kansas in the late 1850s, wasn't
            involved in politics or business, had no local roots, yet became the
            leader of the biggest, most notorious gang of bushwackers in the war.

            Was he merely first among equals - the best shot, the best rider, the
            smoothest talker?

            What accounts for his ability to suddenly appear as the leader of
            hundreds of 'partisan rangers'?


            HankC
          • hartshje
            ... Hank, Only a guess on my part, but I think the fact that he had been a school teacher shows he was probably more educated than the rest of the ruffians who
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 7, 2003
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              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "hank9174" <clarkc@m...> wrote:
              >
              > I'm a bit perplexed as to how William C. Quantrill became a
              > guerilla leader.
              >
              > He was from Ohio, moved to eastern Kansas in the late 1850s, wasn't
              > involved in politics or business, had no local roots, yet became
              > the leader of the biggest, most notorious gang of bushwackers in
              > the war.
              >
              > Was he merely first among equals - the best shot, the best rider,
              > the smoothest talker?
              >
              > What accounts for his ability to suddenly appear as the leader of
              > hundreds of 'partisan rangers'?
              >
              >
              > HankC

              Hank,

              Only a guess on my part, but I think the fact that he had been a
              school teacher shows he was probably more educated than the rest of
              the ruffians who rode with him, and therefore could probably impress
              them. He had actually been running with the Kansas Jayhawkers out of
              Lawrence, KS (which he later attacked). Then for some reason he
              switched sides. I think he was running from the law for robbery and
              figured he might as well fight for the South. He led an abolitionist
              party into an ambush, thereby immediately winning the respect of
              other Missouri bushwackers. Really, most of these bushwackers and
              Jayhawkers were just fighting for love of fighting, stealing and
              killing. These guys made Bonnie and Clyde look like Minnie & Mickey.

              Joe H.
            • David Kowalski
              Hank and Joe, Quantrill was young, educated, and violent. Soime of the sources I ve seen on the net indicate that he was wanted for murder. His original
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 8, 2003
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                Hank and Joe,
                 
                Quantrill was young, educated, and violent.  Soime of the sources I've seen on the net indicate that he was wanted for murder.  His original group was small, only about 12, but he was able to quickly expand.  He didn't fit well during his brief association with the regular army in Texas.  This seems to show that those who stayed with him got plenty of looting, one way or the other.

                hartshje <Hartshje@...> wrote:
                --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "hank9174" <clarkc@m...> wrote:
                >
                > I'm a bit perplexed as to how William C. Quantrill became a
                > guerilla leader.
                >
                > He was from Ohio, moved to eastern Kansas in the late 1850s, wasn't
                > involved in politics or business, had no local roots, yet became
                > the leader of the biggest, most notorious gang of bushwackers in
                > the war.
                >
                > Was he merely first among equals - the best shot, the best rider,
                > the smoothest talker?
                >
                > What accounts for his ability to suddenly appear as the leader of
                > hundreds of 'partisan rangers'?
                >
                >
                > HankC

                Hank,

                Only a guess on my part, but I think the fact that he had been a
                school teacher shows he was probably more educated than the rest of
                the ruffians who rode with him, and therefore could probably impress
                them.  He had actually been running with the Kansas Jayhawkers out of
                Lawrence, KS (which he later attacked).  Then for some reason he
                switched sides.  I think he was running from the law for robbery and
                figured he might as well fight for the South.  He led an abolitionist
                party into an ambush, thereby immediately winning the respect of
                other Missouri bushwackers.  Really, most of these bushwackers and
                Jayhawkers were just fighting for love of fighting, stealing and
                killing.  These guys made Bonnie and Clyde look like Minnie & Mickey.

                Joe H.



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              • hank9174
                I skimmed a chapter in The Devil Knows How to Ride on Qunatrill s formative Civil War days. On an early looting expedition with some Kansas redlegs, he
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 8, 2003
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                  I skimmed a chapter in 'The Devil Knows How to Ride' on Qunatrill's
                  formative Civil War days.

                  On an early looting expedition with some Kansas redlegs, he arrived
                  early at the farm of the target - Morgan Walker a prosperous secesh
                  sympathizer.

                  Walker had a pretty daughter and Quantrill, turning informant,
                  exposed the impending raid. Quantrill played along, was taken to
                  Independence under arrest but freed shortly therafter and forever
                  after aligned with the CSA.

                  Interesting if true...

                  HankC


                  --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, David Kowalski <kywddavid@y...>
                  wrote:
                  > Hank and Joe,
                  >
                  > Quantrill was young, educated, and violent. Soime of the sources
                  I've seen on the net indicate that he was wanted for murder. His
                  original group was small, only about 12, but he was able to quickly
                  expand. He didn't fit well during his brief association with the
                  regular army in Texas. This seems to show that those who stayed with
                  him got plenty of looting, one way or the other.
                  >
                  > hartshje <Hartshje@a...> wrote:
                  > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "hank9174" <clarkc@m...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I'm a bit perplexed as to how William C. Quantrill became a
                  > > guerilla leader.
                  > >
                  > > He was from Ohio, moved to eastern Kansas in the late 1850s,
                  wasn't
                  > > involved in politics or business, had no local roots, yet became
                  > > the leader of the biggest, most notorious gang of bushwackers in
                  > > the war.
                  > >
                  > > Was he merely first among equals - the best shot, the best rider,
                  > > the smoothest talker?
                  > >
                  > > What accounts for his ability to suddenly appear as the leader of
                  > > hundreds of 'partisan rangers'?
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > HankC
                  >
                  > Hank,
                  >
                  > Only a guess on my part, but I think the fact that he had been a
                  > school teacher shows he was probably more educated than the rest of
                  > the ruffians who rode with him, and therefore could probably
                  impress
                  > them. He had actually been running with the Kansas Jayhawkers out
                  of
                  > Lawrence, KS (which he later attacked). Then for some reason he
                  > switched sides. I think he was running from the law for robbery
                  and
                  > figured he might as well fight for the South. He led an
                  abolitionist
                  > party into an ambush, thereby immediately winning the respect of
                  > other Missouri bushwackers. Really, most of these bushwackers and
                  > Jayhawkers were just fighting for love of fighting, stealing and
                  > killing. These guys made Bonnie and Clyde look like Minnie &
                  Mickey.
                  >
                  > Joe H.
                  >
                  >
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                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                  Service.
                  >
                  >
                  >
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