Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [civilwarwest] Dining facilities

Expand Messages
  • GnrlJEJohnston@aol.com
    In a message dated 6/2/2003 4:01:53 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... From my studies Clark, within a group of six to ten soldiers, they elected one man man to do
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
      In a message dated 6/2/2003 4:01:53 PM Eastern Standard Time, clarkc@... writes:

      Who knows how the men ate when in an extended encampment?



      From my studies Clark, within a group of six to ten soldiers, they elected one man man to do the cooking while the others would bring in the food to cook.  At times they would hire a slave (I guess he would be a former slave by this time) to do the cooking with all of them chipping in maybe fifty cents to a dollar to pay him/her.  The latter was also common with officers.  I also believe I sent to you at one time, the "Diary of a Bummer" which also speaks of this subject.   If not, let me know.

      JEJ
    • james2044
      HankC ... tended ... The same system was used no matter where the men were. Rations where issued by weight to units and split up between the men. No mess
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
        HankC
        >
        > Who knows how the men ate when in an extended encampment?
        >
        > In the field, food was distributed to individuals and the men
        tended
        > to aggregate in small groups messing together.

        The same system was used no matter where the men were. "Rations"
        where issued by weight to units and "split up" between the men. No
        mess hall or service existed. Food tended to be "better" in camp
        and the men had more time to cook.


        > What about the navy and riverine units?
        >
        I don't know, but fire was very controlled on a wood ship and that
        control would required a cook.

        James2044
      • Dave Gorski
        Like many Civil War subjects, there is more than one answer, and dozens of exceptions. Often cooking was dependent upon the individual unit. In the case of the
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 2, 2003
          Like many Civil War subjects, there is more than
          one answer, and dozens of exceptions.
          Often cooking was dependent upon the individual unit.
          In the case of the 11th Indiana Battery, a unit that
          I tend to refer to often since I've done extensive
          research on them, they hired cooks although not
          authorized to do so.
          While at Shiloh, a Lt. in the battery wrote,"Our
          company would be called by some an abolition
          concern. We have eight contrabands hired for
          cooking, and this in spite of General Buell's order
          excluding them."
          The United States Sanitary Commission found that
          after a three month campaign with unsupervised
          cooking, up to 40 % of a regiment's soldiers could be
          lost to intestinal problems. They noticed a substantial
          improvement in the health of units who had hired
          cooks for large numbers of men, and by 1863 Congress
          authorized the hiring of cooks down to the company
          level.
          On March 3, 1863, John Caruthers, a 24 year old
          man of "African Descent", was mustered into the all
          white 11th Indiana Battery as an under cook.
          Even while actively campaigning the battery continued
          to use their cooks. On the Atlanta campaign, July 24,
          1864, Lt. Otto reports that "a wheel horse of the
          number one gun had its leg broken by a cannon ball
          which continued to roll into the battery cook department
          creating havoc among the dishes."
          Yes, many units probably still issued the ration directly
          to the men and left them to cook for themselves. But
          that was not always the case. As for the quality of
          food in garrison as opposed to the field. I think that
          there are exceptions there as well. Campaigning very
          often provided the men with the opportunity for fresh
          fruits and vegetables. On several occasions the men
          of the battery, while moving, were able to locate fresh
          peaches, "we took all we could carry." On several other
          occasions vegetables were found, and at least once they
          even made a soup with some clams that they found.

          Regards, Dave Gorski
        • james2044
          Dave I was talking about the quaility of issued food. On the march, men had access to informal food sources. This is from an 1898 ROTC text book on food
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 3, 2003
            Dave

            I was talking about the quaility of issued food. On the march, men
            had access to informal food sources.

            This is from an 1898 "ROTC" text book on food issue:

            These are per man for one day (each line is the full ration)
            MEAT
            pork or beef or bacon 12 oz
            salt beef 22 oz
            fresh beef or mutton 20 oz
            fresh fish or pickled fish 18 oz
            dried fish 14 oz
            Bread
            Flour or soft bread 18 oz
            hard bread 16 oz
            corn bread 20 oz
            vegtable
            potatoes 16 oz (or 80% potatoes 20% onions)
            These items are per 100 men for one day
            Beans or dired peas 15 lbs
            rice or hominy 10 lbs
            Coffee/Tea
            Coffee Green 10 lbs
            Coffee roasted 8 lbs
            Other items
            Sugar 15 lbs
            vinegar 1 gal
            candles 24 oz
            soap 4 lbs
            salt 4 lbs
            black pepper 4 oz
            yeast power 4 lbs

            By this time, companies had kitchens that cooked meals. I don't
            know how much the weights had changed in 30+ years but I think about
            this when I read about drawing rations for 3 days.

            James2044
          • Dave Gorski
            According to Camp Morton 1861 - 1865, by Winslow and Moore, in 1861, Union troops training at Camp Morton were authorized the following Army ration, per
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 3, 2003
              According to "Camp Morton 1861 - 1865,"
              by Winslow and Moore, in 1861, Union troops
              training at Camp Morton were authorized
              the following Army ration, per company:

              Pork 75 lbs
              or
              Beef 125 lbs

              Flour 112.66 lbs
              or
              Hard Bread 100 lbs

              Beans 8 lbs
              or
              Rice 10 lbs

              Coffee 6 lbs
              Sugar 12 lbs
              Vinegar 1 gal
              Candles 1.5 lbs
              Soap 4 lbs
              Salt 2 Qts

              The first Commissary General at Camp Morton, Isaiah
              Mansur, provided substantially greater quantity than
              the regulation, and added a ration of potatoes (100 lbs),
              Onions, dried fruit and pickles.

              Carolyn Mattern, in "Soldiers When They Go," describes
              the "dining facilities," at Camp Randall for Wisconsin
              volunteers, where the men were not issued the ration, but
              had it prepared for them by cooks.
              "For breakfast they were served bread, beef and coffee; for
              dinner beans, bread, meat and potatoes. Every other day they
              had soup in place of beans. Supper consisted of more coffee
              bread and beans. It was not unnatural that even the most
              patriotic of palates should tire of that diet. Nor would it seem
              that the quality was always the best." Mattern goes on to
              describe how tainted meat actually caused several near riots.

              In garrison at Nashville during the closing months of 1862
              and the first weeks of 1863 the Federal Troops were on very
              "short rations." Finally on January 18, 1863, a fleet of 30
              steamboats arrived with provisions. For weeks prior to that
              foraging parties combed the countryside. Cleaning it out of
              foodstuffs.

              At Chattanooga, the ration was so short that guards had to
              be put on the horses when they were fed, in order to keep men
              from stealing food from the horses. Pvt. George Kilpatrick of Co.
              A 42nd Indiana Infantry wrote to his sister, " I take this opportunity
              to write you to let you know that I am alive, but that is about all,
              for we get nothing to eat worth mentioning. I have got down so
              weak that I can't do my duty any more, and the horses and mules
              are dying off at the rate of two hundred a day. The rations I drew
              today were one cracker and a half, one half spoonful of coffee,
              and a little piece of meat for two days."

              After being wounded at Kennesaw Mountain, an officer of the
              11th Indiana Battery described "dining" in the 1st Brigade, 2nd
              Division, 4th Corps Field Hospital. "Each of us got a cup of coffee
              that night...In the morning the same diet was given with the addition
              of a hardtack, at noon a little soup and at evening a cup of coffee
              and a cracker. This was our diet as long as I remained there."

              During the Atlanta campaign an officer reported that meat
              was sent on to various commands "on the hoof," where it was
              slaughtered and distributed. Other food and supplies were held up
              due to the poor condition of the roads.

              My point being, that, IMO, evidence indicates that the quality and
              quantity of food was too variable to make any general statement about
              the quality of the food issued in garrison being better or worse than
              anywhere else.

              Regards, Dave Gorski
            • Dave Gorski
              According to Camp Morton 1861 - 1865, by Winslow and Moore, in 1861, Union troops training at Camp Morton were authorized the following Army ration, per
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 3, 2003
                According to "Camp Morton 1861 - 1865,"
                by Winslow and Moore, in 1861, Union troops
                training at Camp Morton were authorized
                the following Army ration, per company:

                Pork 75 lbs
                or
                Beef 125 lbs

                Flour 112.66 lbs
                or
                Hard Bread 100 lbs

                Beans 8 lbs
                or
                Rice 10 lbs

                Coffee 6 lbs
                Sugar 12 lbs
                Vinegar 1 gal
                Candles 1.5 lbs
                Soap 4 lbs
                Salt 2 Qts

                The first Commissary General at Camp Morton, Isaiah
                Mansur, provided substantially greater quantity than
                the regulation, and added a ration of potatoes (100 lbs),
                Onions, dried fruit and pickles.

                Carolyn Mattern, in "Soldiers When They Go," describes
                the "dining facilities," at Camp Randall for Wisconsin
                volunteers, where the men were not issued the ration, but
                had it prepared for them by cooks.
                "For breakfast they were served bread, beef and coffee; for
                dinner beans, bread, meat and potatoes. Every other day they
                had soup in place of beans. Supper consisted of more coffee
                bread and beans. It was not unnatural that even the most
                patriotic of palates should tire of that diet. Nor would it seem
                that the quality was always the best." Mattern goes on to
                describe how tainted meat actually caused several near riots.

                In garrison at Nashville during the closing months of 1862
                and the first weeks of 1863 the Federal Troops were on very
                "short rations." Finally on January 18, 1863, a fleet of 30
                steamboats arrived with provisions. For weeks prior to that
                foraging parties combed the countryside. Cleaning it out of
                foodstuffs.

                At Chattanooga, the ration was so short that guards had to
                be put on the horses when they were fed, in order to keep men
                from stealing food from the horses. Pvt. George Kilpatrick of Co.
                A 42nd Indiana Infantry wrote to his sister, " I take this opportunity
                to write you to let you know that I am alive, but that is about all,
                for we get nothing to eat worth mentioning. I have got down so
                weak that I can't do my duty any more, and the horses and mules
                are dying off at the rate of two hundred a day. The rations I drew
                today were one cracker and a half, one half spoonful of coffee,
                and a little piece of meat for two days."

                After being wounded at Kennesaw Mountain, an officer of the
                11th Indiana Battery described "dining" in the 1st Brigade, 2nd
                Division, 4th Corps Field Hospital. "Each of us got a cup of coffee
                that night...In the morning the same diet was given with the addition
                of a hardtack, at noon a little soup and at evening a cup of coffee
                and a cracker. This was our diet as long as I remained there."

                During the Atlanta campaign an officer reported that meat
                was sent on to various commands "on the hoof," where it was
                slaughtered and distributed. Other food and supplies were held up
                due to the poor condition of the roads.

                My point being, that, IMO, evidence indicates that the quality and
                quantity of food was too variable to make any general statement about
                the quality of the food issued in garrison being better or worse than
                anywhere else.

                Regards, Dave Gorski
              • DORR64OVI@aol.com
                In a message dated 6/3/03 7:09:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... James....3 days ration were drawn for use on the march. Typically it was nothing more than
                Message 7 of 13 , Jun 3, 2003
                  In a message dated 6/3/03 7:09:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time, james2044@... writes:

                  By this time, companies had kitchens that cooked meals.  I don't
                  know how much the weights had changed in 30+ years but I think about
                  this when I read about drawing rations for 3 days.

                  James2044

                  James....3 days ration were drawn for use on the march.  Typically it was nothing more than hardtack (10 crackers per day), Salt pork (3/4 lb per day) and maybe coffee (in the bean).  Some men cooked the rations all at once to reduce the weight on the march and to have ready cooked food... some men cooked all their rations at once and ate it in one sitting to reduce the weight on the march and not to waste it if killed or wounded.
                     The is a whole list of what the Army was supposed to issue the men daily but the marching ration was never that much.

                  Kent Dorr
                  re
                • Jack Hultquist
                  From Harrison B. Talbert s 1862 letters, Third Indiana Battery Otterville, Missouri, January 23, 1862 We also have to haul our wood about a mile and do our own
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jun 8, 2003
                    1862 letters,
                    Third Indiana Battery
                     
                    Otterville, Missouri, January 23, 1862
                    We also have to haul our wood about a mile and do our own cooking etc.   I will tell you what we draw from the commissary daily, beef or bacon, hominy, beans, rice, soap, and 1 candle to a squad, vinegar, [and] salt.  We have the priviliege of drawing flour or crackers [hardtack] which [ever] we please.  We draw enough of this to make plenty for us to eat and as long as we get plenty of this I’ll not grumble.  I for got, we get plenty of sugar and coffee. Our squad has divided off into 3 messes, me George and 3 others is in our mess.  Our cooking utensils, dishes, etc. consists of 2 camp kettles, 1 frying pan, 1 tin bucket, 2 big sheet iron dishes, a tin plate a peice, and some sort of a smashed up tin cup a peice.  Some have spoons, and some having no k[n]ives or forks.  I have a fork, knife, and spoon altogether which I paid 1.50 for. 
                     
                    Jefferson City, Mo.   May 2 ond  /  62
                    You needent to bother about sending us any eatibles of any kind for it might cause us to founder ourselves [disabled by excessive eating] as we are not use to any such nick nacks.  And since we have been here at Jeff City we have had plenty of bakers bread.  We draw the flour and get the baker to bake it on the shears. 
                     
                    Jefferson  City, Cole County, Mo.  May 4th / 62
                    You may ask the question why I dident go to church or to see George [in the hospital].  The reason I dident is this, I have undertook to cook for the squad (about 20 men) and cooking and doing my duty keeps me busy nearly all the time.  I dont get but little time to write in the day time I have to write of knights. 
                     

                    Jefferson  City  Cole  County  Mo, May  the  24th  1862

                    I am going to express about twenty dollars home.  You may look for it at the express office at Shelbyville about the last of next week (the first of June).  The reason I dont send more is this, the boys hasent all paid me for cooking.  [.....].  The reason I have delayed writing so long is this, since I have been cooking I have been kept so busy that I wrote just as few letters as I could handily make do, just answering all that I received.

                     

                    Was cooking part of Harrison's official duties and or something he did for additional cash?
                    The way he wrote on May 4 and May 24, 1862 it sounds as if cooking was something in addition to his normal battery duties:
                    May 4 - "cooking and doing my duty keeps me busy nearly all the time".
                    May 24 - "the boys hasent all paid me for cooking"
                     
                    This June 26 letter reads as if the cook was also responsible for putting up the shade over the tables.
                    Jefferson City, Mo  June the 26th /62

                    And the wind blew nearly all our tents down, and all the shades that was over our tables and horses except the one that I put up, it stood the storm. 

                     

                  • james2044
                    ... did for additional cash? Jack; Everything I ve read indicates that it was something he did for additional cash. In the ACW, the men were expected to take
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jun 8, 2003
                      > Was cooking part of Harrison's official duties and or something he
                      did for additional cash?

                      Jack;

                      Everything I've read indicates that it was something he did for
                      additional cash. In the ACW, the men were expected to take care of
                      cooking, no offical mess service existed in camp or in the field.

                      James2044
                    • hank9174
                      ... wrote: Jack, your excerpts are always interesting. Another item that impresses me is that in 186x, virtually all cooking and heating was done with wood.
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jun 9, 2003
                        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Hultquist" <jahultqu@a...>
                        wrote:

                        Jack, your excerpts are always interesting.

                        Another item that impresses me is that in 186x, virtually all cooking
                        and heating was done with wood. For armies on the march the wood was
                        necessarily green and smoke terribly.

                        In the early days of steamboating, woodcutting parties were put
                        ashore every night to replenish fuel. Every night, they'd cut the
                        next days supply of fuel. As wood along the riverbanks became thinner
                        the costs of steamboating rose.

                        Another anecdote is of the Boonslick salt works in central Missouri.
                        The sons of Daniel boiled the flow from a saltwater spring to produce
                        salt. The hard work was supplying the wood for the fire. They
                        eventually went out of business from the fact that virtually every
                        tree in the county had been cut and burned for the salt works and it
                        was costing more for the gathering of the fuel than they could gain
                        for a bushel of salt. The spring, remanants of the works and
                        cauldrons are now a park.


                        HankC

                        > From Harrison B. Talbert's
                        > 1862 letters,
                        > Third Indiana Battery
                        >
                        > Otterville, Missouri, January 23, 1862
                        > We also have to haul our wood about a mile and do our own cooking
                        etc. I will tell you what we draw from the commissary daily, beef
                        or bacon, hominy, beans, rice, soap, and 1 candle to a squad,
                        vinegar, [and] salt. We have the priviliege of drawing flour or
                        crackers [hardtack] which [ever] we please. We draw enough of this
                        to make plenty for us to eat and as long as we get plenty of this
                        I'll not grumble. I for got, we get plenty of sugar and coffee. Our
                        squad has divided off into 3 messes, me George and 3 others is in our
                        mess. Our cooking utensils, dishes, etc. consists of 2 camp kettles,
                        1 frying pan, 1 tin bucket, 2 big sheet iron dishes, a tin plate a
                        peice, and some sort of a smashed up tin cup a peice. Some have
                        spoons, and some having no k[n]ives or forks. I have a fork, knife,
                        and spoon altogether which I paid 1.50 for.
                        >
                        > Jefferson City, Mo. May 2 ond / 62
                        > You needent to bother about sending us any eatibles of any kind for
                        it might cause us to founder ourselves [disabled by excessive eating]
                        as we are not use to any such nick nacks. And since we have been
                        here at Jeff City we have had plenty of bakers bread. We draw the
                        flour and get the baker to bake it on the shears.
                        >
                        > Jefferson City, Cole County, Mo. May 4th / 62
                        > You may ask the question why I dident go to church or to see George
                        [in the hospital]. The reason I dident is this, I have undertook to
                        cook for the squad (about 20 men) and cooking and doing my duty keeps
                        me busy nearly all the time. I dont get but little time to write in
                        the day time I have to write of knights.
                        >
                        > Jefferson City Cole County Mo, May the 24th 1862
                        >
                        > I am going to express about twenty dollars home. You may look for
                        it at the express office at Shelbyville about the last of next week
                        (the first of June). The reason I dont send more is this, the boys
                        hasent all paid me for cooking. [.....]. The reason I have delayed
                        writing so long is this, since I have been cooking I have been kept
                        so busy that I wrote just as few letters as I could handily make do,
                        just answering all that I received.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Was cooking part of Harrison's official duties and or something he
                        did for additional cash?
                        > The way he wrote on May 4 and May 24, 1862 it sounds as if cooking
                        was something in addition to his normal battery duties:
                        > May 4 - "cooking and doing my duty keeps me busy nearly all the
                        time".
                        > May 24 - "the boys hasent all paid me for cooking"
                        >
                        > This June 26 letter reads as if the cook was also responsible for
                        putting up the shade over the tables.
                        > Jefferson City, Mo June the 26th /62
                        > And the wind blew nearly all our tents down, and all the shades
                        that was over our tables and horses except the one that I put up, it
                        stood the storm.
                      • carlw4514
                        Hank, watched a real interesting thing on TV once about how local iron-making traditions in Africa died out because of the inability to keep up with the
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jun 9, 2003
                          Hank, watched a real interesting thing on TV once about how local
                          iron-making traditions in Africa died out because of the inability to
                          keep up with the charcoal demand [what they had to use], the trees
                          would just get all cut down, too. This was a "local peoples" thing,
                          they would be able to make some simple tools from iron ore. The
                          film-makers talked some of the old guys into showing how they did it,
                          and they produced some iron. Durned interesting, how the charcoal got
                          hot enough [isn't supposed to get hot enough] was a mystery till
                          these old-timers showed them the technique.
                          -Do you know where the salt was headed, Hank? Fetched a good price in
                          the Confederacy but I wonder about what they could get otherwise.
                          Carl

                          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "hank9174" <clarkc@m...> wrote:
                          > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Hultquist"
                          <jahultqu@a...>
                          > wrote:
                          >
                          > Jack, your excerpts are always interesting.
                          >
                          > Another item that impresses me is that in 186x, virtually all
                          cooking
                          > and heating was done with wood. For armies on the march the wood was

                          > necessarily green and smoke terribly.
                          >
                          > In the early days of steamboating, woodcutting parties were put
                          > ashore every night to replenish fuel. Every night, they'd cut the
                          > next days supply of fuel. As wood along the riverbanks became
                          thinner
                          > the costs of steamboating rose.
                          >
                          > Another anecdote is of the Boonslick salt works in central Missouri.
                          > The sons of Daniel boiled the flow from a saltwater spring to
                          produce
                          > salt. The hard work was supplying the wood for the fire. They
                          > eventually went out of business from the fact that virtually every
                          > tree in the county had been cut and burned for the salt works and it
                          > was costing more for the gathering of the fuel than they could gain
                          > for a bushel of salt. The spring, remanants of the works and
                          > cauldrons are now a park.
                          >
                          >
                          > HankC
                          >
                          > > From Harrison B. Talbert's
                          > > 1862 letters,
                          > > Third Indiana Battery
                          > >
                          > > Otterville, Missouri, January 23, 1862
                          > > We also have to haul our wood about a mile and do our own cooking
                          > etc. I will tell you what we draw from the commissary daily, beef
                          > or bacon, hominy, beans, rice, soap, and 1 candle to a squad,
                          > vinegar, [and] salt. We have the priviliege of drawing flour or
                          > crackers [hardtack] which [ever] we please. We draw enough of this
                          > to make plenty for us to eat and as long as we get plenty of this
                          > I'll not grumble. I for got, we get plenty of sugar and coffee. Our
                          > squad has divided off into 3 messes, me George and 3 others is in
                          our
                          > mess. Our cooking utensils, dishes, etc. consists of 2 camp
                          kettles,
                          > 1 frying pan, 1 tin bucket, 2 big sheet iron dishes, a tin plate a
                          > peice, and some sort of a smashed up tin cup a peice. Some have
                          > spoons, and some having no k[n]ives or forks. I have a fork, knife,
                          > and spoon altogether which I paid 1.50 for.
                          > >
                          > > Jefferson City, Mo. May 2 ond / 62
                          > > You needent to bother about sending us any eatibles of any kind
                          for
                          > it might cause us to founder ourselves [disabled by excessive
                          eating]
                          > as we are not use to any such nick nacks. And since we have been
                          > here at Jeff City we have had plenty of bakers bread. We draw the
                          > flour and get the baker to bake it on the shears.
                          > >
                          > > Jefferson City, Cole County, Mo. May 4th / 62
                          > > You may ask the question why I dident go to church or to see
                          George
                          > [in the hospital]. The reason I dident is this, I have undertook to
                          > cook for the squad (about 20 men) and cooking and doing my duty
                          keeps
                          > me busy nearly all the time. I dont get but little time to write in
                          > the day time I have to write of knights.
                          > >
                          > > Jefferson City Cole County Mo, May the 24th 1862
                          > >
                          > > I am going to express about twenty dollars home. You may look for
                          > it at the express office at Shelbyville about the last of next week
                          > (the first of June). The reason I dont send more is this, the boys
                          > hasent all paid me for cooking. [.....]. The reason I have delayed
                          > writing so long is this, since I have been cooking I have been kept
                          > so busy that I wrote just as few letters as I could handily make do,
                          > just answering all that I received.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Was cooking part of Harrison's official duties and or something he
                          > did for additional cash?
                          > > The way he wrote on May 4 and May 24, 1862 it sounds as if cooking
                          > was something in addition to his normal battery duties:
                          > > May 4 - "cooking and doing my duty keeps me busy nearly all the
                          > time".
                          > > May 24 - "the boys hasent all paid me for cooking"
                          > >
                          > > This June 26 letter reads as if the cook was also responsible for
                          > putting up the shade over the tables.
                          > > Jefferson City, Mo June the 26th /62
                          > > And the wind blew nearly all our tents down, and all the shades
                          > that was over our tables and horses except the one that I put up, it
                          > stood the storm.
                        • hank9174
                          The Boone salt works was all early-early-19th century...1820 maybe. The product was used locally. I can t hink of too many ways to preserve meat without
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jun 9, 2003
                            The Boone salt works was all early-early-19th century...1820 maybe.
                            The product was used locally. I can't hink of too many ways to
                            preserve meat without salting it or smoking it. Both processes
                            require a fair amount of fuel.

                            The Boones had quite an influence here. Daniel died in Missouri. The
                            local area is known as the Boonslick due to the salt works. I live in
                            Boone County and the next town to the west is Boonville.

                            Speaking of food, is your kitchen back together?


                            HankC


                            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "carlw4514" <carlw4514@y...>
                            wrote:
                            > Hank, watched a real interesting thing on TV once about how local
                            > iron-making traditions in Africa died out because of the inability
                            to
                            > keep up with the charcoal demand [what they had to use], the trees
                            > would just get all cut down, too. This was a "local peoples" thing,
                            > they would be able to make some simple tools from iron ore. The
                            > film-makers talked some of the old guys into showing how they did
                            it,
                            > and they produced some iron. Durned interesting, how the charcoal
                            got
                            > hot enough [isn't supposed to get hot enough] was a mystery till
                            > these old-timers showed them the technique.
                            > -Do you know where the salt was headed, Hank? Fetched a good price
                            in
                            > the Confederacy but I wonder about what they could get otherwise.
                            > Carl
                            >
                            > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "hank9174" <clarkc@m...> wrote:
                            > > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Hultquist"
                            > <jahultqu@a...>
                            > > wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Jack, your excerpts are always interesting.
                            > >
                            > > Another item that impresses me is that in 186x, virtually all
                            > cooking
                            > > and heating was done with wood. For armies on the march the wood
                            was
                            >
                            > > necessarily green and smoke terribly.
                            > >
                            > > In the early days of steamboating, woodcutting parties were put
                            > > ashore every night to replenish fuel. Every night, they'd cut the
                            > > next days supply of fuel. As wood along the riverbanks became
                            > thinner
                            > > the costs of steamboating rose.
                            > >
                            > > Another anecdote is of the Boonslick salt works in central
                            Missouri.
                            > > The sons of Daniel boiled the flow from a saltwater spring to
                            > produce
                            > > salt. The hard work was supplying the wood for the fire. They
                            > > eventually went out of business from the fact that virtually
                            every
                            > > tree in the county had been cut and burned for the salt works and
                            it
                            > > was costing more for the gathering of the fuel than they could
                            gain
                            > > for a bushel of salt. The spring, remanants of the works and
                            > > cauldrons are now a park.
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > HankC
                            > >
                            > > > From Harrison B. Talbert's
                            > > > 1862 letters,
                            > > > Third Indiana Battery
                            > > >
                            > > > Otterville, Missouri, January 23, 1862
                            > > > We also have to haul our wood about a mile and do our own
                            cooking
                            > > etc. I will tell you what we draw from the commissary daily,
                            beef
                            > > or bacon, hominy, beans, rice, soap, and 1 candle to a squad,
                            > > vinegar, [and] salt. We have the priviliege of drawing flour or
                            > > crackers [hardtack] which [ever] we please. We draw enough of
                            this
                            > > to make plenty for us to eat and as long as we get plenty of this
                            > > I'll not grumble. I for got, we get plenty of sugar and coffee.
                            Our
                            > > squad has divided off into 3 messes, me George and 3 others is in
                            > our
                            > > mess. Our cooking utensils, dishes, etc. consists of 2 camp
                            > kettles,
                            > > 1 frying pan, 1 tin bucket, 2 big sheet iron dishes, a tin plate
                            a
                            > > peice, and some sort of a smashed up tin cup a peice. Some have
                            > > spoons, and some having no k[n]ives or forks. I have a fork,
                            knife,
                            > > and spoon altogether which I paid 1.50 for.
                            > > >
                            > > > Jefferson City, Mo. May 2 ond / 62
                            > > > You needent to bother about sending us any eatibles of any kind
                            > for
                            > > it might cause us to founder ourselves [disabled by excessive
                            > eating]
                            > > as we are not use to any such nick nacks. And since we have been
                            > > here at Jeff City we have had plenty of bakers bread. We draw
                            the
                            > > flour and get the baker to bake it on the shears.
                            > > >
                            > > > Jefferson City, Cole County, Mo. May 4th / 62
                            > > > You may ask the question why I dident go to church or to see
                            > George
                            > > [in the hospital]. The reason I dident is this, I have undertook
                            to
                            > > cook for the squad (about 20 men) and cooking and doing my duty
                            > keeps
                            > > me busy nearly all the time. I dont get but little time to write
                            in
                            > > the day time I have to write of knights.
                            > > >
                            > > > Jefferson City Cole County Mo, May the 24th 1862
                            > > >
                            > > > I am going to express about twenty dollars home. You may look
                            for
                            > > it at the express office at Shelbyville about the last of next
                            week
                            > > (the first of June). The reason I dont send more is this, the
                            boys
                            > > hasent all paid me for cooking. [.....]. The reason I have
                            delayed
                            > > writing so long is this, since I have been cooking I have been
                            kept
                            > > so busy that I wrote just as few letters as I could handily make
                            do,
                            > > just answering all that I received.
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > Was cooking part of Harrison's official duties and or something
                            he
                            > > did for additional cash?
                            > > > The way he wrote on May 4 and May 24, 1862 it sounds as if
                            cooking
                            > > was something in addition to his normal battery duties:
                            > > > May 4 - "cooking and doing my duty keeps me busy nearly all the
                            > > time".
                            > > > May 24 - "the boys hasent all paid me for cooking"
                            > > >
                            > > > This June 26 letter reads as if the cook was also responsible
                            for
                            > > putting up the shade over the tables.
                            > > > Jefferson City, Mo June the 26th /62
                            > > > And the wind blew nearly all our tents down, and all the shades
                            > > that was over our tables and horses except the one that I put up,
                            it
                            > > stood the storm.
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.