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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Union evolution of strategy at Vicksburg

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  • Martin Williams
    But until late in 1862 Eastern Arkansas was part of the Department of the Missouri. Grant had had to reinforce it with the better part of the old 3rd Division
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 30, 2003
      But until late in 1862 Eastern Arkansas was part of the Department of the
      Missouri. Grant had had to reinforce it with the better part of the old 3rd
      Division in July of that year, but aside from competing with his department
      (among others) for resources and perhaps affecting his contingency planning,
      it was not his responsibility. After it was turned over to him (and placed
      within McClernand's XIII Corps), Grant got two divisions out of it.

      Going back to what I summarized from Reed, from approximately August to
      October, 1862, Grant was counting on Curtis to organize some kind of attack
      either directly against Vicksburg or directly across the river at
      Pemberton's left flank.

      When it appeared that Curtis would be unable to cooperate as of the
      beginning of November, Grant ordered Sherman to remain in Memphis with the
      two divisions of the Right Wing in readiness to head down river against
      Vicksburg.

      By the middle of the month, Curtis was in a position to do something after
      all, so Grant called Sherman forward to join the overland campaign.

      Then, on December 8th, after learning that Curtis' efforts had been
      thwarted, Grant sent Sherman and one division back to Memphis to reform the
      river option. By then Grant had learned of the imminent arrival of A. J.
      Smith and Morgan with their divisions, and he had the authority to take
      over Steele's Division from Curtis' command.

      Therefore I don't see the existing garrison strengths as something holding
      back either Grant or Curtis.

      As for the naval problem, the main point was that the ironclads were too
      slow and unmaneuverable to run back up river past Vicksburg under fire and
      exposed to attack by rebel gunboats. Once Vicksburg had surrendered it was
      no longer a concern. There was also the matter of supplying any ships sent
      down river, and Porter was further concerned about the number of ships he
      could take from other areas of his command.






      >From: "bjer50010" <bjewell@...>
      >Reply-To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      >To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Union evolution of strategy at Vicksburg
      >Date: Wed, 30 Apr 2003 14:48:52 -0000
      >

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