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McClernand as commander

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  • josepharose
    As to Halleck s knowledge of who would command the expedition, the following order seems conclusively clear. Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting
    Message 1 of 74 , Apr 28, 2003
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      As to Halleck's knowledge of who would command the expedition, the
      following order seems conclusively clear.


      Order of the Secretary of the Navy to Acting Rear-Admiral Porter,
      U. S. Navy, to prepare for cooperation with Major-General Mc-
      Clernand, U. S. Army.

      NAVY DEPARTMENT, November 15, 1862.
      SIR: The general-in-chief informs the Department that General
      McClernand will probably he able to move down the Mississippi in
      about three weeks, and that he will be directed to confer with you in
      regard to a naval movement in conjunction therewith. You will have
      ready at the time indicated by General McClernand a sufficient naval
      force to accompany that officer, and you will cooperate with him to
      the utmost extent in the important object entrusted to the combined
      forces destined to open the Mississippi.
      Very respectfully,
      GIDEON WELLES,
      Secretary of the Navy.
      Acting Rear-Admiral DAVID D. PORTER,
      Commanding Illississippi Squadron, Cairo, Ill.


      Halleck knew; he was just playing dumb, and Grant went along with
      him.

      Joseph
    • Will
      Thanks Dave. Good points to ponder. ~Will ... better
      Message 74 of 74 , May 6, 2003
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        Thanks Dave.
        Good points to ponder.
        ~Will
        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, Dave Gorski <bigg@m...> wrote:
        > >
        > >Good points. I was thinking that long-term encampments would have
        > >better sanitary and shelter arrangements and the men would be
        better
        > >rested than encampents of men campaigning.
        >
        > Secretary Olmsted of the Sanitary Commission issued a
        > "Circular to the Colonels of the Army," in which he stated
        > that "It is well known that when a considerable body of men
        > have been living together in camp a few weeks a peculiar
        > subtle poison is generated..."
        > Another factor was that many soldiers were from rural areas
        > where they had not had exposure to common illnesses, and had
        > not built up any immunities. Groups in garrison were exposed to
        > and often died of childhood diseases.
        > Often soldiers who were hospitalized for wounds, died of some
        > disease that they had been exposed to while in the hospital,
        > especially typhoid.
        > Yet, another point is that a soldier on the move was likely to
        > have had occasion to have fresh fruits and vegetables than the
        > soldier stuck in camp for weeks on end. A better diet made
        > for a healthier soldier.
        >
        > Regards, Dave Gorski
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