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Re: Lew Wallace's Destination

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  • Will
    ... Arkansas, losing all identity as a division. Wallace himself gave up command of the division in June; Dyer does not give an exact date. In September the
    Message 1 of 92 , Apr 3, 2003
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Williams"
      <williams484@m...> wrote:
      > ...
      > Wallace's 3rd Division was transferred to the District of East
      Arkansas, losing all identity as a division. Wallace himself gave up
      command of the division in June; Dyer does not give an exact date.
      In September the state of Arkansas was transferred to the Department
      of Missouri.

      Wallace requested a leave of absence at the end of June. His
      division was transferred in July.


      > ...
      > My suspicious nature speculates that there was still some bad
      feeling toward Wallace that July, that the 3rd Division was broken up
      to give him nothing to command if and when he returned to duty, and
      that if he insisted on going to Arkansas anyway he would still be
      located in a comparative backwater.


      I don't understand why the fate of his former division made a
      difference, as commanders could be shuffled from division to division.
      Also, the definition of East Arkansas as a backwater is relative: it
      became part of the staging area for the Vicksburg Campaign and was
      the scene of the battle of Helena. Wallace almost returned in late
      1862 and was slated to take command of Corinth.

      Still, my sense is that Halleck definitely had bad feelings about
      Wallace. In ealry 1863, Wallace would write to Halleck with the
      concern that a bad feeling existed in Halleck's office and that
      Halleck himself entertained these feelings--this is what led to
      statements about Shiloh from McPherson, Rowley and Rawlins. Halleck
      certainly expressed his negative feelings about Wallace later in the
      war, generally as part of negative words about politically connected
      generals.

      ~Will
    • Will
      ... He was also a general in the war of 1812, Secretary of War under Jackson, Secretary of State under Buchanan [until he resigned during the secession crisis]
      Message 92 of 92 , Apr 11, 2003
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        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, GnrlJEJohnston@a... wrote:
        > ...Lewis Cass (first governor of
        > Michigan I believe)...

        He was also a general in the war of 1812, Secretary of War under
        Jackson, Secretary of State under Buchanan [until he resigned during
        the secession crisis] and the Democratic Party's Presidential
        Candidate in 1848 (lost to Taylor), in addition to a bunch of other
        sutff (amassador, congressman, senator)
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