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An interesting book

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  • hank9174
    I m reading a thin volume from the library printed in the mid-1990s named The Armies of U. S. Grant by James R. Arnold. It s a good little book written by an
    Message 1 of 92 , Apr 1, 2003
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      I'm reading a thin volume from the library printed in the mid-1990s
      named 'The Armies of U. S. Grant' by James R. Arnold.

      It's a good little book written by an Englishman with no axes to
      grind. It has a good mix of theory, strategy, tactics, military
      minutia, organization and weapons. The substance of the book is
      the changes in military doctrine within the context of politics,
      history, goals and available resources. The text has a good mix of
      quotations from all ranks.

      The title is a bit misleading as the emphasis is on the armies rather
      than on Grant. Grant's career is used to follow the army's evolution
      during the war as he was involved in all of the major campaigns (his
      words, not mine) and in much of the decision-making.

      A few items of interest from the book:

      * The AotT created siege cannon at Vicksburg by boring out oak trees
      and reinforcing them with iron bands.

      * Arnold feels that Champion's Hill was the decisive engagement of the
      war. It was a chance for Pemberton to delay the AotT and allow a
      convergence of two major CSA forces.

      * Early recommendations were to organize US regiments on the 3
      battalion system of 2 front-line battalions and 1 depot battalion a la
      the regular army. The depot battalion would recruit, assimilate and
      train and then rotate into the line.

      * CSA lack of technology actually *aided* it's cavalry. Both sides
      wished to arm horsemen primarily with sabers and lances. The south
      could not produce effective quantities of edged weapons so resorted to
      pistols and shotguns, which proved much more effective.

      * Here's a name I never knew: Irishman Mike Lawler, from Illinois,
      whose motto was "If you see a head, hit it"...


      Cheers,
      HankC
    • Will
      ... He was also a general in the war of 1812, Secretary of War under Jackson, Secretary of State under Buchanan [until he resigned during the secession crisis]
      Message 92 of 92 , Apr 11, 2003
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        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, GnrlJEJohnston@a... wrote:
        > ...Lewis Cass (first governor of
        > Michigan I believe)...

        He was also a general in the war of 1812, Secretary of War under
        Jackson, Secretary of State under Buchanan [until he resigned during
        the secession crisis] and the Democratic Party's Presidential
        Candidate in 1848 (lost to Taylor), in addition to a bunch of other
        sutff (amassador, congressman, senator)
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