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Battle of Shiloh

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  • Blake Robinson
    I think Beauregard Called off the battle at the end of the First Day at Shiloh because he wanted a victory in his name, and if he had won the battle that day
    Message 1 of 64 , Feb 15, 2003
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      I think Beauregard Called off the battle at the end of the First Day at Shiloh because he wanted a victory in his name, and if he had won the battle that day it would be known as Albert Sidney Johnston's Victory not his.



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    • theme_music <theme_music@yahoo.com>
      ... The ravine for Tilghman branch is pretty significant. There is a dirt road, not open to public vehicles, that runs north away from a point near the
      Message 64 of 64 , Feb 18, 2003
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        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, Jfepperson@a... wrote:
        > In a message dated 2/18/2003 12:33:41 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        wh_keene@y... writes:
        >
        > >
        > > Can someone refresh my memory: was Pond's final assault
        > > across Dill Creek or Tillman Branch?
        >
        > Pond fought on the CS left which means he was in front
        > of Sherman and McClernand, which means his final assault
        > would have been over Tilghman Branch.
        >

        The ravine for Tilghman branch is pretty significant. There is a
        dirt road, not open to public vehicles, that runs north away from a
        point near the Corinth Rd-Purdy intersection ( behind SHerman;s HQ.)
        Walking this way takes you through Jones field, then you drop down
        into the ravine. It's a pretty good climb back up. I remember some
        markers there, and some burial sites, I'm foggy on the specifics, but
        I believe Sherman/McClernand made a stand along the ravine, and then
        pulled back closer to the Hanburg-Savannah road. Pond, IIRC, got
        hammered trying to cross a field just east of the ravine.

        Another feature relevant to "attacking across a stream" is the Shiloh
        branch that fronted Sherman's right. This is not a particularly deep
        ravine, more like a dip, much, much less of an obstacle than Dill or
        Tilgman. My recollection is that the thick canebrake and swampiness
        described in the ORs is no longer present. Sherman held this
        position against repeated frontal assaults, notably by Pat Cleburne's
        brigade, but it was not seriously threatened from the front. Rather
        the falling back of Prentiss, and then Sherman's left side brigade
        (Hildebrand) allowed the rebs to flank the position.

        Eric
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