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Confederate Fort Names - a correction

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  • panzerbaer@aol.com
    In a message dated 04/9/00 14:08:29 Uhr, KEACLA1@AOL.COM writes:
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 4, 2000
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      In a message dated 04/9/00 14:08:29 Uhr, KEACLA1@... writes:
      << McPherson, commander of the Army of the Tennessee when he was killed
      during the Atlanta campaign, was the only army commander killed on the Union
      side >>

      Thanks for correcting my error in saying he was the only Union
      general KIA. I went back to my sources to see where
      I made my mistake and found the original quote I had read in Symond's
      biography of Cleburne:
      "McPherson...the only Union army commander to be killed in battle during
      the war"
      Apparently, I read that section too fast and transposed general with
      army commander. Another list-reader also alerted me to this and I'm
      glad to have my error cleared up.
      In re-examining this point, I found out that Ft McPherson was originally
      a Confederate barracks, was destroyed during the burning of Atlanta,
      and rebuilt/renamed later by Union troops.
      I'd still be interested in hearing any other leads on the following
      related questions:
      - the naming of US military installations after Confederates, was
      it only done under Wilson in WW1 as Mr Small's info suggests?
      - given that naming an installation after someone suggests an
      effort to honor that person on a continuing basis, has anyone
      experienced a ceremony or other remembrance at these facilities
      for a Confederate namesake?
      - all arguments aside about the "morality" of Confederate names,
      has anyone heard of any protest of these names, such as possibly
      by black troops during WW2? or Northern-born soldiers who
      were training in Southern posts during WW2?

      Again, I'm looking for facts on these questions, not opinions.
      If you are wondering why I am asking such an off-beat question,
      it is because in the course of researching my plane crash, I am
      also looking at the CW battle which took place at the same site
      (Battle of New Hope Church, 25 May 1864). There is an interesting
      Old South/New South angle to the convergence of those two events in
      the same small town. I won't go in-depth on that here, but I
      welcome any info as a side issue on the Confederate naming of these
      military installations. (or even Union names used in the South!)

      Thanks for your help,
      Frederick L Clemens
    • panzerbaer@aol.com
      In a message dated 04/9/00 14:08:29 Uhr, KEACLA1@AOL.COM writes:
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 4, 2000
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        In a message dated 04/9/00 14:08:29 Uhr, KEACLA1@... writes:
        << McPherson, commander of the Army of the Tennessee when he was killed
        during the Atlanta campaign, was the only army commander killed on the Union
        side >>

        Thanks for correcting my error in saying he was the only Union
        general KIA. I went back to my sources to see where
        I made my mistake and found the original quote I had read in Symond's
        biography of Cleburne:
        "McPherson...the only Union army commander to be killed in battle during
        the war"
        Apparently, I read that section too fast and transposed general with
        army commander. Another list-reader also alerted me to this and I'm
        glad to have my error cleared up.
        In re-examining this point, I found out that Ft McPherson was originally
        a Confederate barracks, was destroyed during the burning of Atlanta,
        and rebuilt/renamed later by Union troops.
        I'd still be interested in hearing any other leads on the following
        related questions:
        - the naming of US military installations after Confederates, was
        it only done under Wilson in WW1 as Mr Small's info suggests?
        - given that naming an installation after someone suggests an
        effort to honor that person on a continuing basis, has anyone
        experienced a ceremony or other remembrance at these facilities
        for a Confederate namesake?
        - all arguments aside about the "morality" of Confederate names,
        has anyone heard of any protest of these names, such as possibly
        by black troops during WW2? or Northern-born soldiers who
        were training in Southern posts during WW2?

        Again, I'm looking for facts on these questions, not opinions.
        If you are wondering why I am asking such an off-beat question,
        it is because in the course of researching my plane crash, I am
        also looking at the CW battle which took place at the same site
        (Battle of New Hope Church, 25 May 1864). There is an interesting
        Old South/New South angle to the convergence of those two events in
        the same small town. I won't go in-depth on that here, but I
        welcome any info as a side issue on the Confederate naming of these
        military installations. (or even Union names used in the South!)

        Thanks for your help,
        Frederick L Clemens
      • David Woodbury
        ... McPherson is described this way in a lot of sources, with Albert Sydney Johnston being his Confederate counterpart, but it seems to me that Nathaniel Lyon
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 4, 2000
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          At 5:06 PM -0400 9/4/00, panzerbaer@... wrote:
          >I went back to my sources to see where
          >I made my mistake and found the original quote I had read in Symond's
          >biography of Cleburne: "McPherson...the only Union army commander to
          >be killed in battle during the war"

          McPherson is described this way in a lot of sources, with Albert
          Sydney Johnston being his Confederate counterpart, but it seems to me
          that Nathaniel Lyon should be counted as another U.S. army commander
          KIA. When he was killed at Wilson's Creek I believe his force was
          officially designated the Army of the West.

          David
        • David Woodbury
          ... McPherson is described this way in a lot of sources, with Albert Sydney Johnston being his Confederate counterpart, but it seems to me that Nathaniel Lyon
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 4, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            At 5:06 PM -0400 9/4/00, panzerbaer@... wrote:
            >I went back to my sources to see where
            >I made my mistake and found the original quote I had read in Symond's
            >biography of Cleburne: "McPherson...the only Union army commander to
            >be killed in battle during the war"

            McPherson is described this way in a lot of sources, with Albert
            Sydney Johnston being his Confederate counterpart, but it seems to me
            that Nathaniel Lyon should be counted as another U.S. army commander
            KIA. When he was killed at Wilson's Creek I believe his force was
            officially designated the Army of the West.

            David
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