Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Thomas and Duplicity

Expand Messages
  • josepharose <josepharose@yahoo.com>
    Mr. Jewell: You write that, Sherman fully intended, and never hid the fact, for Thomas to handle the case. No! Sherman told Thomas the case was his, If you
    Message 1 of 84 , Jan 2, 2003
      Mr. Jewell:

      You write that, "Sherman fully intended, and never hid the fact, for
      Thomas to handle the case." No! Sherman told Thomas the case was
      his, "If you request it." That's a strange way to show one's fulll
      intentions. Just because Sherman reneged on what he wrote to
      Thomas later doesn't mean that he fully intended this from the first.

      You wrote: "His use of the phrase "If you request it", while clumsy
      and ambiguous, obviously is intended to inform Thomas that he could
      accept or decline the case." No! "If you request it" is not at all
      ambiguous. It is very clear cut: Thomas could request it, but he
      didn't have to. Thomas DIDN'T request it.

      By not requesting it, Thomas precluded any blame for himself.
      Sherman could certainly change his mind and order Thomas to take the
      case, but Thomas is well within his rights to wonder why Sherman
      changed his mind.

      You wrote: "Thomas strongly endorsed Sherman's plan and did NOT
      refuse the assignment." Your supposition that Thomas *strongly
      endorsed* this is completely without foundation. This supposition
      also contradicts your statements: "Thomas chose to reply to one
      ambiguous message with an even more ambiguous message," and "Sherman
      read Thomas's message as tacit approval of and request for the
      assignment and acted accordingly." I don't even think that you can
      call Thomas' response a "tacit approval," much less a strong
      endorsement.

      Your initial accusations against Thomas concerned disingenuousness
      and even duplicity; now you've tacked on another charge:
      informing "another officer of your displeasure with an order from a
      superior, without informing that superior of your displeasure is a
      breach of military protocol." You can't charge Thomas with that on
      the basis of his statement: "I do not know why General Sherman
      should have ordered him to be sent to me for punishment, as I did
      not know anything about him." It's nonsensical to think so.

      Joseph
    • josepharose <josepharose@yahoo.com>
      Mr. Weeks, You recently mentioned not having an index to Sherman s memoirs, IIRC, which makes me think that you or others might also not have a digital copy of
      Message 84 of 84 , Mar 3, 2003
        Mr. Weeks,

        You recently mentioned not having an index to Sherman's memoirs,
        IIRC, which makes me think that you or others might also not have a
        digital copy of that work or of other useful books.

        Would it be helpful, and would your website have the extra megabytes
        (several MBs per book, roughly), for me to upload into your database
        such texts as Sherman's, Grant's, and Sheridan's memoirs and Van
        Horne's biography of Thomas? If so, once I return home, I would be
        glad to do so.

        I could put these in Word and/or .TXT formats.

        Joseph
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.