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Re: Thomas and Duplicity

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  • josepharose <josepharose@yahoo.com>
    ... pass judgment ... know who and ... drummer and I ... Ms. Boone and Mr. Smith: Your criticism of Thomas is founded on Thomas ignorance of Keim after he
    Message 1 of 84 , Jan 1, 2003
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, Aurelie1999@a... wrote:
      > In a message dated 12/31/2002 1:53:11 PM Central Standard Time,
      > dmsmith001@y... writes:
      >
      > > I'm confused, Connie, how Thomas could know enough about Keim to
      > > finger him and recommend him for execution, but then afterwards
      > > plead "ignorance." Is it a semantics thing that I'm not
      > > understanding? :-)
      > >
      > > Dave
      > >
      >
      > I guess, but what do I know. I thought if a man is willing to
      pass judgment
      > and recommend the ultimate sentence, it is incumbent on him to
      know who and
      > why at the very minimum. I suppose some march to a different
      drummer and I
      > haven't been told the tune.
      >
      > Connie

      Ms. Boone and Mr. Smith:

      Your criticism of Thomas is founded on Thomas' "ignorance" of Keim
      after he was able to "finger" Keim and then "recommend" execution.

      Thomas' statement that "I did not know anything about him" came
      exactly one day after identifying him. As he did not write, "I *do*
      not know anything about him," than it stands to reason that he was
      speaking about his knowledge at a past point in time--let's say two
      days before. Please read Thomas as he wrote; he didn't even make a
      poitive ID, merely stating that the article was "written, or
      pretended to be written" by Keim.

      Besides ignoring those facts, you make two, even more obvious
      mistakes. Thomas identified Keim through the article in the New
      York Herald. A lowly corporal serving in the Army of the Potomac
      could have "fingered" Keim in this respect just as well as Thomas
      did. In truth, *everyone* who read the article could have
      identified Keim!

      Secondly, if that corporal was even somewhat astute, he could also
      have recommended execution for a reporter who divulged what was
      obviously an important military secret. It doesn't take a very high
      IQ to recognize that.

      It's too bad that Sherman and McPherson didn't take "every
      precaution to prevent [the breaking of their code] being known to
      the rebels." I recommend that you take some of your high dudgeon
      for Thomas and transfer it to those two, instead.

      Joseph
    • josepharose <josepharose@yahoo.com>
      Mr. Weeks, You recently mentioned not having an index to Sherman s memoirs, IIRC, which makes me think that you or others might also not have a digital copy of
      Message 84 of 84 , Mar 3, 2003
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        Mr. Weeks,

        You recently mentioned not having an index to Sherman's memoirs,
        IIRC, which makes me think that you or others might also not have a
        digital copy of that work or of other useful books.

        Would it be helpful, and would your website have the extra megabytes
        (several MBs per book, roughly), for me to upload into your database
        such texts as Sherman's, Grant's, and Sheridan's memoirs and Van
        Horne's biography of Thomas? If so, once I return home, I would be
        glad to do so.

        I could put these in Word and/or .TXT formats.

        Joseph
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